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What is better:
to have large code area in lock statement
or
to have small locks in large area?..
exchanges in this sample are not changable.

lock (padLock)
{
  foreach (string ex in exchanges)
  {
     sub.Add(x.ID, new Subscription(ch, queue.QueueName, true));
.........
}

or

foreach (string ex in exchanges)
{
  lock (padLock) 
  {
     sub.Add(x.ID, new Subscription(ch, queue.QueueName, true));
  }
.....
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2  
It completely depends on what you're locking for. –  SLaks Dec 27 '11 at 13:38
    
@SLaks, i think i dont fully understand when to use locking then.. :( –  0x49D1 Dec 27 '11 at 13:39
1  
Your example is not completed so does not makes sense in scope of question since neither ex nor exchanges are not used in loop, so hard to suggest you something concrete –  sll Dec 27 '11 at 13:41
1  
@0x49D1: If you don't understand when to use locking, don't do it. You'll end up with race conditions, deadlocks, or complete lack of parallelism. –  SLaks Dec 27 '11 at 13:44
    
@SLaks, but i have to make some things parallel..For now i try to put locks in all sections of "parallel" code that change. –  0x49D1 Dec 27 '11 at 13:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The wider lock - the less you get from multithreading, and vice versa So, use of locks completely depends on logic. Lock only things and places which changing and have to run only by one thread in a time

If you lock for using the collection sub - use smaller lock, but if you run multiple simultaneous foreach loops in parallel

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Good practise would be to only lock that area which you want to be executed by only one thread at a given time

If that area is whole foreach loop then first approach is fine

but if that area is just one line as you have shown I second approach then go for the second approach

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In this particular case, the best option is the first one, because otherwise you're just wasting time locking/unlocking since you have to execute the entire loop anyway. So there's not much opportunity for parallelism in a loop that executes individually atomic operations anyway.

For more general advice on critical section sizes check this article: http://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/managing-lock-contention-large-and-small-critical-sections/

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I think there are two different questions:
1. Which would be correct?
2. Which would give better performance?

The correctness question is complicated. It depends on your data structures, and how you intend the lock to protect them. If the "sub" object is not thread-safe, you definitely need the big lock.

The performance question is simpler and less important (but for some reason, I think you're focused on it more).
Many small locks may be slower, because they just do more work. But if you manage to run a large portion of the loop code without lock, you get some concurrency, so it would be better.

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thank you for nice explanation. Ive put the loops with not thread safe collections into locks as ive done with some chunks of code which contain collection modifications. The bad in large lock statement for me here was that the block also contained some methods that were from same class and used same sync object. So, i think, sometimes that lead to deadlocks(or just not needed locks) in the running program :( After all the modifications program is more responsive now. –  0x49D1 Dec 27 '11 at 14:47

You can't effectively judge which is "right" with the given code snippets. The first example says it is not OK for people to see sub with only part of the content from exchanges. The second example says it is OK for people to see sub with only part of the content from exchanges.

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