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ok, the following code works ok in IE7+ and Chrome. but for some reason, xfade is undefined in firefox

<html>
    <body>
        <div id="slider"></div>
        <script type="text/javascript">
var Klimateka = {
    Slider: function () {
        // Check if we have a slider div on page
        var slider = document.getElementById('slider');
        if (slider != null) {
            var images = ["slide-image-1.jpg", "slide-image-2.jpg", "slide-image-3.jpg", "slide-image-4.jpg"];
            var i = images.length;
            while (i) {
                i -= 1;
                var img = document.createElement("img");
                img.src = "images/" + images[i];
                slider.appendChild(img);
            }
            var d = document, imgs = new Array(), zInterval = null, current = 0, pause = false;
            imgs = d.getElementById("slider").getElementsByTagName("img");
            for (i = 1; i < imgs.length; i++) imgs[i].xOpacity = 0;
            imgs[0].style.display = "block";
            imgs[0].xOpacity = .99;

            setTimeout("xfade()", 3500);

            function xfade() {
                cOpacity = imgs[current].xOpacity;
                nIndex = imgs[current + 1] ? current + 1 : 0;

                nOpacity = imgs[nIndex].xOpacity;

                cOpacity -= .05;
                nOpacity += .05;

                imgs[nIndex].style.display = "block";
                imgs[current].xOpacity = cOpacity;
                imgs[nIndex].xOpacity = nOpacity;

                setOpacity(imgs[current]);
                setOpacity(imgs[nIndex]);

                if (cOpacity <= 0) {
                    imgs[current].style.display = "none";
                    current = nIndex;
                    setTimeout(xfade, 3500);
                } else {
                    setTimeout(xfade, 50);
                }

                function setOpacity(obj) {
                    if (obj.xOpacity > .99) {
                        obj.xOpacity = .99;
                        return;
                    }
                    obj.style.opacity = obj.xOpacity;
                    obj.style.MozOpacity = obj.xOpacity;
                    obj.style.filter = "alpha(opacity=" + (obj.xOpacity * 100) + ")";
                }
            }
        }
    },

    bar: function () {
    }
}; 

Klimateka.Slider();

i have setup a jsfiddler for testing: http://jsfiddle.net/rTtKh/10/

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This might only apply to Firefox:

functions do not hoist when declared inside a child block.

You declare xfade inside the if block, but you are calling it prior to the declaration:

setTimeout(xfade, 3500);

Put the function declaration on top.

You have to do the same with setOpacity inside xfade. <- That is not necessary.

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Ahhhh haaaaa. got it ^_^. that makes sense :-D –  Neal Dec 27 '11 at 14:04
    
Yes - also it'd be a really good idea to make sure all those variables in "xfade()" are properly declared with var at whatever scope level is appropriate. –  Pointy Dec 27 '11 at 14:07
    
@Pointy - i think you missed it, since they are declared. –  Dementic Dec 27 '11 at 14:18
    
@Felix - that fixed the problem, but i was sure FF is standard compliant. –  Dementic Dec 27 '11 at 14:20
1  
@Dementic Per the standard, having a function statement inside an if should throw a SyntaxError exception and stop parsing the script. All browsers deviate from the standard here by extending the JS syntax to allow such function statements inside if blocks, but they have subtly different behavior for these extensions. Had you stuck to writing valid JavaScript code, you wouldn't have run into the problems with those different behaviors.... –  Boris Zbarsky Dec 28 '11 at 4:18

Fix your line that says this: setTimeout("xfade()", 3500); to match your others:

setTimeout(xfade, 3500);
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The fiddle already uses this version, but the error is still there. –  Felix Kling Dec 27 '11 at 14:03
    
I wonder what makes it work in IE and Chrome. I know that IE does some bizarre things with named function expressions, but that "xfade" function is just a regular function declaration. edit - ah. :-) –  Pointy Dec 27 '11 at 14:04
    
@Pointy see @Felix's answer ^_^ –  Neal Dec 27 '11 at 14:05

Use setTimeout(xfade, 3500) instead.

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