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Hi I want to convert a class's all String field values to their uppercase format. How can I do this? Please help.

Example:

public class ConvertStringToUppercase{
    private String field1; //to be converted Uppercase
    private String field2; //to be converted Uppercase
    private String field3; //to be converted Uppercase
    ...... //more fields
} 
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Do you want to convert the field names or their values? –  Thomas Dec 27 '11 at 15:06
    
I want to convert field values –  olyanren Dec 27 '11 at 15:07
1  
Put them in a collection and then give the class a method, toUpperCase() where you loop through the collection assigning each String its upper case representation. Note, that reflection can solve this as well, but whenever I think "reflection" I wonder if instead do I need to re-design my program. What is the motivation behind this anyway? –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Dec 27 '11 at 15:07
1  
Step 1: Get all the fields. Step 2: Narrow to strings. Step 3: Convert and set back. Step 4: ??? Step 5: Profit. –  Dave Newton Dec 27 '11 at 15:09
1  
What's the use case of this? Why don't you adjust the value in the getter or setter? –  Thomas Dec 27 '11 at 15:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use reflection for a quick and dirty solution:

ConvertStringToUpperCase t = new ConvertStringToUpperCase();
for(Field f: t.getClass().getDeclaredFields()) {            
    if(f.getType().equals(String.class)) {              
        f.setAccessible(true);
        f.set(t, ((String)f.get(t)).toUpperCase());
    }           
}

This is not a nice approach however, since private fields should not be modified this way.

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3  
quick and dirty indeed...and in practice, this is definitely not the approach to take. –  mre Dec 27 '11 at 15:20
    
@Tudor, thank you –  olyanren Dec 27 '11 at 15:21
    
How is this more efficient than doing it in the class itself? Reflection is not cheap.. –  NG. Dec 27 '11 at 19:40
public class ConvertStringToUppercase{
    private String field1; //to be converted Uppercase
    private String field2; //to be converted Uppercase
    private String field3; //to be converted Uppercase

    public void toUpperCase() {
        this.field1 = this.field1.toUpperCase();
        this.field2 = this.field2.toUpperCase();
        this.field3 = this.field3.toUpperCase();
        // ...
    }
}

Or, if you want immutability:

public class ConvertStringToUppercase{
    private String field1; //to be converted Uppercase
    private String field2; //to be converted Uppercase
    private String field3; //to be converted Uppercase

    public ConvertStringToUppercase toUpperCase() {
        return new ConvertStringToUppercase(this.field1.toUpperCase(),
                                            this.field2.toUpperCase(),
                                            this.field3.toUpperCase(),
                                            // ...);
    }
}

Make sure to check for null if the fields are nullable.

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+1 this answer pretty much covers everything, including null checks. :D –  mre Dec 27 '11 at 15:16
    
@mre I don't see null checks :) - it's still one of the cleanest ways of doing it. (+1) –  Thomas Dec 27 '11 at 15:21
    
@Thomas, Make sure to check for null if the fields are nullable. :D –  mre Dec 27 '11 at 15:22
    
@mre yes, didn't see that .. D'oh! –  Thomas Dec 27 '11 at 15:23

You can do it using reflection but it will be ugly and slow. Use ConvertStringToUppercase.class.getDeclaredFields() to get Field objects. Then use field.getType() == String.class to determine when field is of String type.

Then use field.get(this) to get the string, uppercase it, then use field.set(this, upperCaseString) to set the field to the new value.

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you can cache list of Field objects of string type to skip first two steps when doing multiple invocations. –  U Mad Dec 27 '11 at 15:12
try {
    ConvertStringToUppercase testClass = new ConvertStringToUppercase();
    for (Field field : testClass.getClass().getDeclaredFields()) {
          if (field.getType().equals(String.class)) {
            if (!field.isAccessible()) 
                field.setAccessible(true);
            if (field.get(testClass) != null && ((String) field.get(testClass)).trim() != "") {                          
                field.set(testClass, ((String) field.get(testClass)).toUpperCase());
            }
          }  
    }
} catch (Exception e) {e.printStackTrace();}
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