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I was wondering if anyone could tell me how I'm supposed to initialise a member array of objects, in the occasion that the object does not have a default constructor (i.e. requires parameters).

For example:

class Foo
{
public:
   Foo() : 
      memberArray{bar(1), bar(3), bar(2)}   // **The compiler doesnt like this** 
   {}
private:
   Bar memberArray[3];
};


struct Bar
{
   Bar(std::int32_t param1) {  }
}

I'm using GCC 4.6.1, and compiling for c++11. Can anyone point out where I'm going wrong? (BTW. please don't suggest dynamically allocated memory, as I don't have it..)

share|improve this question
    
gcc 4.6.1 is already old, in terms of the C++11 standard. Can you try with 4.6.2 or bleeding-edge? –  Ben Voigt Dec 27 '11 at 15:07
    
a million duplicates –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 27 '11 at 15:09
1  
Also, post a minimal reproduction of the problem. What you have now won't compile (inconsistent case, struct Bar used before declaration) and we can't tell whether those problems are related to your error. –  Ben Voigt Dec 27 '11 at 15:09
    
@Ben Voigt: It's very difficult for me to upgrade as the compiler's repackaged by a third-party (CodeSourcery) and 4.6.1 is what their latest version is built around. Is this a compiler problem then? Should it be possible in c++11? –  evo_race Dec 27 '11 at 15:13
    

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You've got several problems: inconsistent case, use before declaration, missing semicolons, missing includes. This is a lot closer:

struct Bar
{
   Bar(int param1) {  }
};

class Foo
{
public:
   Foo() : 
      memberArray{Bar(1), Bar(3), Bar(2)}
   {}
private:
   Bar memberArray[3];
};
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. That was pseudo-code to represent my actual problem and I really should have tried to compile it first.... A bigger mistake as that I was really using std::array<Bar,3> memberArray and this was causing the compilation error. By changing it to Bar memberArray[3] as above, the problem has gone. –  evo_race Dec 27 '11 at 15:28
    
@TimYorke: So, the question actually has nothing at all to do with your real problem, and the solution was to actually use the code you posted? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 27 '11 at 15:50
    
Yes, I'm sorry. Lesson learnt.. From now on, I will always compile my quoted code before I post. –  evo_race Dec 27 '11 at 17:15
    
@TimYorke : std::array<> should work just fine, you just may need an extra set of braces in the initializer since you're using aggregate initialization on std::array<>'s underlying C-array. –  ildjarn Dec 27 '11 at 20:30

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