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I have a list of lists and I want to be able to refer to the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc. column in a list of lists. Here is my code for the list:

matrix = [
    [0, 0, 0, 5, 0, 0, 0, 0, 6],
    [8, 0, 0, 0, 4, 7, 5, 0, 3],
    [0, 5, 0, 0, 0, 3, 0, 0, 0],
    [0, 7, 0, 8, 0, 0, 0, 0, 9],
    [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0],
    [9, 0, 0, 0, 0, 4, 0, 2, 0],
    [0, 0, 0, 9, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0],
    [7, 0, 8, 3, 2, 0, 0, 0, 5],
    [3, 0, 0, 0, 0, 8, 0, 0, 0],
    ]

I want to be able to say something like:

matrix = [
    [0, 0, 0, 5, 0, 0, 0, 0, 6],
    [8, 0, 0, 0, 4, 7, 5, 0, 3],
    [0, 5, 0, 0, 0, 3, 0, 0, 0],
    [0, 7, 0, 8, 0, 0, 0, 0, 9],
    [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0],
    [9, 0, 0, 0, 0, 4, 0, 2, 0],
    [0, 0, 0, 9, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0],
    [7, 0, 8, 3, 2, 0, 0, 0, 5],
    [3, 0, 0, 0, 0, 8, 0, 0, 0],
    ]
if (The fourth column in this matrix does not have any 1's in it):
    (then do something)

I want to know what the python syntax would be for the stuff in parenthesis.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this:

if all(row[3] != 1 for row in matrix):
    # do something

The row[3] part takes a look at the fourth element of a row, the for row in matrix part looks at all the rows in the matrix - this produces a list with all the fourth elements in all the rows, that is, the whole fourth column. Now if it is true for all the elements in the fourth column that they're different from one, then the condition is satisfied and you can do what you need inside the if.

A more traditional approach would be:

found_one = False
for i in xrange(len(matrix)):
    if matrix[i][3] == 1:
        found_one = True
        break
if found_one:
    # do something

Here I'm iterating over all the rows (i index) of the fourth column (3 index), and checking if an element is equal to one: if matrix[i][3] == 1:. Notice that the for cycle goes from the 0 index up to the "height" of the matrix minus one, that's what the xrange(len(matrix)) part says.

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So row[3] would look at all rows in the fourth position? I am assuming when you said " the for col in matrix part looks at all the rows in the matrix" you meant for row in matrix. could I somehow make separate lists of these? Somehow compile the values into new lists so I could get counts and things? –  chingchong Dec 27 '11 at 16:00
    
Not exactly, row[3] looks at the fourth element in a given row, and row[3] for row in matrix looks at all the fourth elements of all the rows. The expression [row[x] for row in matrix] will return all the elements of the x row in a separate list. –  Óscar López Dec 27 '11 at 16:04
    
Oh great, thanks! I will probably be using this method. –  chingchong Dec 27 '11 at 16:07
    
If I wanted to have a different condition than != would that be possible? –  chingchong Dec 27 '11 at 16:08
    
Sure thing @TerriMoore, any operator that evaluates to a boolean value would work (examples: ==, !=, >, <, >=, <=) –  Óscar López Dec 27 '11 at 16:17

The standard way to perform what you asked is to do a list comprehension

if (The fourth column in this matrix does not have any 1's in it):

translates in:

>>>if not any([1 == row[3] for row in matrix])

However, depending on how often you need to perform this operation, how big is your matrix, etc... you might wish to look into numpy as it is easier (and remarkably faster) to address columns. An example:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> matrix = np.random.randint(0, 10, (5, 5))
>>> matrix
array([[3, 0, 9, 9, 3],
       [5, 7, 7, 7, 6],
       [5, 4, 6, 2, 2],
       [1, 3, 5, 0, 5],
       [3, 9, 7, 8, 6]])
>>> matrix[..., 3]  #fourth column
array([9, 7, 2, 0, 8])
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I am not looking at rows that I know how to do. What I am lacking is a good way to make columns in my "matrix." –  chingchong Dec 27 '11 at 15:31
    
Before you didn't have any of the stuff about numpy. You just edited it. I will look at it again. –  chingchong Dec 27 '11 at 15:43
1  
+1 to suggest the use of numpy. I think is the right choice for this kind of problems –  fabrizioM Dec 27 '11 at 16:49
if 1 in [row[3] for row in matrix]:
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This again would help me do rows but what I am looking for is a way to define columns. Columns being say the 5th value in all of the lists. A kind of "vertical row." –  chingchong Dec 27 '11 at 15:35
    
But that's exactly what this gives you. row[3] for row in matrix is the column in position 3. –  Daniel Roseman Dec 27 '11 at 15:49
    
So it isn't looking at the third row, but at the third value in all rows? –  chingchong Dec 27 '11 at 15:56
    
Yes. It's called a list comprehension (or a generator expression). Try it out in the interpreter: print [row[3] for row in matrix] will give you [5, 0, 0, 8, 0, 0, 9, 3, 0]. –  Daniel Roseman Dec 27 '11 at 15:58
2  
I don't know how to make myself any clearer: that's exactly what the list comprehension does. –  Daniel Roseman Dec 27 '11 at 16:05

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