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Why this regex:

[^\s]+  

...says that this string:

"user's extension"

isn't exact match?

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Please show some actual code. –  Oli Charlesworth Dec 27 '11 at 16:17
    
[^\\s] matches the beginning of the line followed by a whitespace character, 1 or more times. The only problem is that the beginning on the line doesn't occur more than once for a string on one line. try moving the ^ outside the [] –  Hunter McMillen Dec 27 '11 at 16:19
2  
@HunterMcMillen: No, the ^ means "negation" inside a character class. –  Tim Pietzcker Dec 27 '11 at 16:22
    
"[^\\s]+.*" - this will –  Yola Dec 27 '11 at 16:25
2  
What does this have anything to do with Qt? –  Stephen Chu Dec 27 '11 at 16:29
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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The regex only matches a string that doesn't contain any whitespace. Your matching method appears to apply the regex to the entire string, therefore it fails.

[abc] is a character class, meaning "either a, b or c".
[^abc] is the inverse of that class meaning "any character except a, b or c".
\s means "any whitespace character".
[^\s] (which can also be written as \S) means "any non-whitespace character".
+ means "one or more of the preceding token.

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#Tim Pietzcker thanks, +1 and will accept –  user336635 Dec 27 '11 at 16:20
    
Except that the backslash is escaped, and so it will match white space. –  jmoreno Dec 27 '11 at 16:57
    
@jmoreno: No, the double backslash is only for string escaping. –  Tim Pietzcker Dec 27 '11 at 17:12
    
@TimPietzcker: Looking at how my answer was displaying, I guess I'll have to accept that (and delete my answer). –  jmoreno Dec 27 '11 at 18:33
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Your regex would match strings only with one or more non-whitespace characters. "user's extension" contains matching substrings, but it is not a match itself because of the space character.

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