Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am following these steps, but I continue to get an error and don't see the issue:

1) Create a custom Oracle datatype that represents the database columns that you want to retrieve:

CREATE TYPE my_object AS OBJECT
     (COL1       VARCHAR2(50),
      COL2       VARCHAR2(50),
      COL3       VARCHAR2(50));

2) Create another datatype that is a table of the object you just created:


    TYPE MY_OBJ_TABLE AS TABLE OF my_object;

3) Create a function that returns this table. Also use a pipeline clause so that results are pipelined back to the calling SQL, for example:


    CREATE OR REPLACE
    FUNCTION MY_FUNC (PXOBJCLASS varchar2)
    RETURN MY_OBJ_TABLE pipelined IS
    TYPE ref1 IS REF CURSOR
    Cur1 ref1,
    out_rec_my_object := my_object(null,null,null);
    myObjClass VARCHAR2(50);
    BEGIN
    myObjClass := PXOBJCLASS
    OPEN Cur1 For ‘select PYID, PXINSNAME, PZINSKEY from PC_WORK where PXOBJCLass = ;1’USING myObjClass,
    LOOP
        FETCH cur1 INTO out_rec.COL1, out_rec.COL2, out_rec.COL3;
        EXIT WHEN Cur1%NOTFOUND;
        PIPE ROW (out_rec);
    END LOOP;
    CLOSE Cur1;
    RETURN;
    END MY_FUNC; 

NOTE: In the example above, you can easily replace the select statement with a call to another stored procedure that returns a cursor variable.

4) In your application, call this function as a table function using the following SQL statement:

select COL1, COL2, COL3 from TABLE(MY_FUNC('SomeSampletask'));
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is no need to use dynamic sql (dynamic sql is always a little bit slower) and there are too many variables declared. Also the for loop is much easier. I renamed the argument of the function from pxobjclass to p_pxobjclass.

Try this:

create or replace function my_func (p_pxobjclass in varchar2)
return my_obj_table pipelined
is 
begin
  for r_curl in (select pyid,pxinsname,pzinskey 
                 from   pc_work
                 where  pxobjclass = p_pxobjclass) loop
    pipe row (my_object(r_curl.pyid,r_curl.pxinsname,r_curl.pzinskey));          
  end loop;
  return; 
end;

EDIT1:

It is by the way faster to return a ref cursor instead of a pipelined function that returns a nested table:

create or replace function my_func2 (p_pxobjclass in varchar2)
return sys_refcursor
is 
  l_sys_refcursor sys_refcursor; 
begin
  open l_sys_refcursor for 
    select pyid,pxinsname,pzinskey 
    from   pc_work
    where  pxobjclass = p_pxobjclass;
  return l_sys_refcursor;  
end;

This is faster because creating objects (my_object) takes some time.

share|improve this answer

Maybe I'm misunderstanding something here, but it seems like you want to be using a VIEW.

share|improve this answer
    
The goal is to call a stored procedure from a select statement, and if that can be achieved from a VIEW then its definitely a good option. –  Sheraz May 14 '09 at 18:00

I see two problems:

  1. The dynamic query does not work that way, try this:

    'select PYID, PXINSNAME, PZINSKEY from PC_WORK where PXOBJCLass ='''||PXOBJCLASS||''''

You don't need myObjClass, and it seems all your quotes are wrong.

  1. The quoting on 'SomeSampletask'...

    select COL1, COL2, COL3 from TABLE(MY_FUNC('SomeSampletask'));

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.