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After reading over some of the other responses to this type of question I am still left with the warning. In this snippet I pull a UserActivation from my database. By this point there will always be at least one UserActivation. If there is more then one something has gone all pear shaped... I followed some other instructions on how to squelch the warning regarding an unproven source but to no avail.The warning is: Warning 83 CodeContracts: requires unproven: source != null on line 161, see method below for the specific line.

This is the method

    private static UserActivation GetUserActivation(Guid userId)
    {
        UserActivations userActivations = UserActivation.GetUserActivationsByUser(userId: userId);

        Contract.Assume(userActivations != null);

        if (userActivations.Count() > 1) // Line Number 161
            throw new Exception("More then one user action found in database");

        return userActivations[0];
    }

I am using CC version 1.4.40602.0, As requested here is the UserActivations declaration.

public class UserActivations : BusinessListBase<UserActivation>
{
    #region Constructors
    internal UserActivations()
    {
    }

    internal UserActivations(IList<UserActivation> list)
        : base(list)
    {
    }

    internal UserActivations(IEnumerable<UserActivation> list)
        : base(list)
    {
    }

And here is the GetUserActivationByUser method

    public static UserActivations GetUserActivationsByUser(User user = null, Guid userId = new Guid())
    {
        Contract.Requires(user != null || userId != null, "Either user or userId must have a value");
        Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<UserActivations>() != null);

        Guid id = new Guid();
        if (user != null)
            id = user.Id;
        else
            id = userId;

        return new UserActivations(StorageManager.SelectAll(
            Criteria.And(
            Criteria.EqualTo("UserId", id),
            Criteria.EqualTo("Deleted", false))));
    }

The original code was:

Public static UserActivations GetUserActivationsByUser(User user = null, Guid userId = new Guid())
    {
        Guid id = new Guid();
        if (user != null)
            id = user.Id;
        else
            if (userId != Guid.Empty)
                id = userId;
            else
                throw new Exception("Either user or userId must have a value");

        UserActivations uas = new UserActivations(StorageManager.SelectAll(
            Criteria.And(
            Criteria.EqualTo("UserId", id),
            Criteria.EqualTo("Deleted", false))));

        Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<UserActivations>() != null);

        return uas;
    }
share|improve this question
    
Are you sure about the lineno ? I would think userActivations[0]; would trip a (different) warning. What does the Count() signature look like? And isn't there a Count property? –  Henk Holterman Dec 27 '11 at 16:55
    
I am very sure about the line number, its not the userActivations[0], or so the ide would have us believe. The Count() signature is simply the IEnumerable Count()... public static int Count<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source); –  Siegeon Dec 27 '11 at 17:04
    
@HenkHolterman It must be the LINQ operator, int System.Linq.Enumerable.Count<T>(IEnumerable<T> source). I believe it has requires(source != null). Yet I don't understand why it cannot be proven: there is an assumption... –  Pavel Gatilov Dec 27 '11 at 17:05
    
@Pavel - It probably depends on how UserActivations looks. –  Henk Holterman Dec 27 '11 at 17:15
1  
It's strange that you don't get runtime exceptions: Contract.Ensures must be put in the contract block - before any other code. Perhaps this is the reason of the verifier's failure. In my case your code won't even compile 8) –  Pavel Gatilov Dec 27 '11 at 17:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would try using a different method, perhaps avoiding the linq Enumerable extension methods. Doesn't the UserActivations class have some method or property of its own to determine how many elements an instance holds?

In any event, you shouldn't use the Count() extension method to test whether a sequence is empty, because it will enumerate the entire sequence (if the sequence does not implement ICollection). Or, as Pavel Gatilov pointed out, if the object implements IQueryable, Count may unexpectedly execute a database query.

That's not a big deal here, where you expect to have one element, but it could be a big deal in cases where a sequence might regularly have thousands of elements. Instead, you should use the Any() extension method.

Since using Any() probably won't change things from the contract analyzer's point of view, though, you should use the UserActivations class's Count property (assuming it implements ICollection, for example).

Perhaps you can help the contract analyzer this way:

private static UserActivation GetUserActivation(Guid userId) 
{ 
    UserActivations userActivations = UserActivation.GetUserActivationsByUser(userId: userId); 

    IEnumerable<UserActivation> e = (IEnumerable<UserActivation>)userActivations;

    Contract.Assume(e != null); 

    if (e.Count() > 1) // Line Number 161 
        throw new Exception("More then one user action found in database"); 

    return userActivations[0]; 
} 

A better solution, if you control the UserActivations class, would be to add Contract.Ensures to GetUserActivationsByUser to say that the method will never return null.

share|improve this answer
    
You are wrong. Count() is OK if the IEnumerable instance is actually an ICollection: its implementation checks if the instance implements ICollection and if it does, returns the Count property value instead of enumerating the sequence. –  Pavel Gatilov Dec 27 '11 at 17:09
    
And if the instance does not implement ICollection, then using Count() is bad for another reason: if it's an IQueryable, then Count() may execute a DB query, which might be unexpected. –  Pavel Gatilov Dec 27 '11 at 17:10
2  
@PavelGatilov if the programmer knows that the type implements ICollection, then wouldn't it be better to call the ICollection count property directly? Using Count() > 0 is a bad habit that leads to Count() being called on non-collection enumerables. I've most frequently seen it used on Where iterators, which do not have a Count property. And if the Where condition is computationally expensive, performance is terrible. –  phoog Dec 27 '11 at 17:12
    
@PavelGatilov thanks, I'll add the IQueryable bit to the answer. –  phoog Dec 27 '11 at 17:13
    
Good and bad habbits are not the question's topic. My comments relate to the fact that you've claimed that Count() enumerates the source, while it does not necesarilly do that. On the other hand, in most cases the real reason of performance hit related to inappropriate usage of Count() is not having big sequences, but having sequences that do long actions upon enumeration, like IQueryables. Having this said, I do agree that LINQ operators should be used with care to avoid double-enumeration. –  Pavel Gatilov Dec 27 '11 at 17:23

Check your build log. You are using Contract.Ensures incorrectly. You should have a warning for the incorrect usage, like this one:

warning CC1025: CodeContracts: After contract block, found use of local variable 'dataEvents' defined in contract block

Your method should be:

public static UserActivations GetUserActivationsByUser(User user = null, Guid userId = new Guid())
{
    Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<UserActivations>() != null);

    Guid id = new Guid();
    if (user != null)
        id = user.Id;
    else
        if (userId != Guid.Empty)
            id = userId;
        else
            throw new Exception("Either user or userId must have a value");

    UserActivations uas = new UserActivations(StorageManager.SelectAll(
        Criteria.And(
        Criteria.EqualTo("UserId", id),
        Criteria.EqualTo("Deleted", false))));

    return uas;
}

I cannot prove, but I suppose this might make the verifier mad.

In fact, if I turn on run-time checks, your code won't even compile: the ccrewrite will fail.

share|improve this answer
    
I already updated my method to ensure that the post condition is up at the top, thank you again. –  Siegeon Dec 27 '11 at 18:15
    
@Siegeon Yeah, I've seen. I just wanted to pull this out so that everyone could see the reason. If your issues are solved, I'd better returned your original code so that others could see the original, broken one. –  Pavel Gatilov Dec 27 '11 at 18:32

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