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I have an array like this:

>>> np.ones((8,8))
array([[ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.]])

I'm creating a disc shaped mask with radius 3 thus:

y,x = np.ogrid[-3: 3+1, -3: 3+1]
mask = x**2+y**2 <= 3**2

This gives:

>> mask
array([[False, False, False,  True, False, False, False],
       [False,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True, False],
       [False,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True, False],
       [ True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True],
       [False,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True, False],
       [False,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True, False],
       [False, False, False,  True, False, False, False]], dtype=bool)

Now, I want to be able to apply this mask to my array, using any element as a center point. So, for example, with center point at (1,1), I want to get an array like:

>>> new_arr
array([[ True,  True,  True,  True,    1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ True,  True,  True,  True,    1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ True,  True,  True,  True,    1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,    True,    1.,    1.,    1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,      1.,    1.,    1.,    1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,      1.,    1.,    1.,    1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,      1.,    1.,    1.,    1.,  1.,  1.,  1.]])

Is there an easy way to apply this mask?

Edit: I shouldn't have mixed booleans and floats - it was misleading.

>>> new_arr
array([[ 255.,  255.,  255.,  255.,    1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 255.,  255.,  255.,  255.,  255.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 255.,  255.,  255.,  255.,    1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 255.,  255.,  255.,  255.,    1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,    255.,    1.,    1.,    1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,      1.,    1.,    1.,    1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,      1.,    1.,    1.,    1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,      1.,    1.,    1.,    1.,  1.,  1.,  1.]])

This is more the result I require.

array[mask] = 255

will mask the array using centre point (0+radius,0+radius).

However, I'd like to be able to place any size mask at any point (y,x) and have it automatically trimmed to fit.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I would do it like this, where (a, b) is the center of your mask:

import numpy as np

a, b = 1, 1
n = 7
r = 3

y,x = np.ogrid[-a:n-a, -b:n-b]
mask = x*x + y*y <= r*r

array = np.ones((n, n))
array[mask] = 255
share|improve this answer
    
This is perfect, thanks. –  user816555 Dec 29 '11 at 18:10

I just wanted to share with everyone a slightly more advanced application of this technique that I just had to face.

My problem was to apply this circular kernel to compute the mean of all the values surrounding each point in a 2D matrix. The kernel generated can be passed to scipy's generic filter in the following way:

import numpy as np
from scipy.ndimage.filters import generic_filter as gf

kernel = np.zeros((2*radius+1, 2*radius+1))
y,x = np.ogrid[-radius:radius+1, -radius:radius+1]
mask = x**2 + y**2 <= radius**2
kernel[mask] = 1
circular_mean = gf(data, np.mean, footprint=kernel)

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer

Did you try making a mask or zeroes and ones and then using per-element array multiplication? This is the canonical way, more or less.

Also, are you certain you want a mix of numbers and booleans in a numpy array? NumPy, as the name implies, works best with numbers.

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I'm sorry about the confusion regarding the number/booleans mix. Hopefully the question isn't as misleading anymore. Could you explain your first sentence more? –  user816555 Dec 27 '11 at 17:51

To get the same result as in your example, you can do something like this:

>>> new_arr = np.array(ones, dtype=object)
>>> new_arr[mask[2:, 2:]] = True
>>> print new_arr
array([[True, True, True, True, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0],
       [True, True, True, True, True, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0],
       [True, True, True, True, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0],
       [True, True, True, True, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0],
       [1.0, True, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0],
       [1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0],
       [1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0],
       [1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0]], dtype=object)
share|improve this answer
    
It works... but that's quite a hack, with array duplication and changing the dtype of it... Multiplication by 0/1 is the canonical way as suggested by @9000. –  mac Dec 27 '11 at 17:19
    
@mac Yes, I agree. I expected to get some feedback from the OP to find out what he's really looking for. –  jcollado Dec 27 '11 at 17:52
    
I'm sorry for being misleading. I clarified my question in my post. What I want is a way to get the elements in the original array that are covered by the mask, given a center point (y,x) for the mask. Then I can manipulate them as required. –  user816555 Dec 27 '11 at 18:39

To put it one convenient function:

def cmask(index,radius,array):
  a,b = index
  nx,ny = array.shape
  y,x = np.ogrid[-a:nx-a,-b:ny-b]
  mask = x*x + y*y <= radius*radius

  return(sum(array[mask]))

Returns the pixel sum within radius, or return(array[mask] = 2) for whatever need.

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