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I need to execute a certain JavaScript when accesing the custom URL.

At this time the code behind the button that triggers the JavaScript that I need to be ran is this:

  <a class="button" href="#" 

  onclick="new Request.HTML({
  method: 'post',
  url: '/ro/somefolder/anotherfolder',
  data: {'user_id': 777, 'score': 1, 'redirect': '1'},
  update: $('vote_user_777'),
  evalScripts: true
}).send();return false;">

<img src="/images/game/thumbsup.gif" alt="vote">
</a>

</span>
</p>


share|improve this question
    
Could you be a little more specific as to what you're problem is? I'm sorry, I'm having difficulty understanding what's wrong. –  Andrew Noyes May 14 '09 at 18:17
    
I said that on the website there is a button which when pressed triggers that JavaScript, all i want is a custom URL ( page URL + something ) to execute that JavaScript, the second is accesed. –  Cumatru May 14 '09 at 19:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You didn't say what problem you were experiencing, but the syntax looks like the MooTools library.

So I put together a little Javascript that should work, and is more in line with MooTools style.

  window.addEvent('domready',function() {
    var request = new Request.HTML({
    	method: 'post',
    	url: '/ro/somefolder/anotherfolder',
    	data: {'user_id': 777, 'score': 1, 'redirect': '1'},
    	update: $('vote_user_777'),
    	evalScripts: true
    });
    $$('a.button').addEvent('click',function(e) {
    	e.stop();
    	request.send();
    });
});
share|improve this answer

If you're referring to embedding your JavaScript in a URL rather than attaching it as an event handler, you could do something like this:

<a href="javascript:void(new Request.HTML({...}).send())">

Using the void() function ensures that nothing is returned so that the browser does not navigate away from the current page.

share|improve this answer
    
The return false statement in his function already takes care of that. –  Andrew Noyes May 14 '09 at 18:16
    
Yes, but if he's trying to embed his script in a URL, returning false will either generate an error or take you to a page named "false". When using a javascript: URL, you should wrap it in void() instead. –  Ben Blank May 14 '09 at 18:20
    
Actually, when the onclick handler returns false, it doesn't execute it's default, which is traveling to the href. –  seanmonstar May 14 '09 at 18:23
    
Yes… I realize that. You'll note that the example code I provided doesn't have an onclick handler. This is instead of an onclick handler, as stated in my answer. –  Ben Blank May 14 '09 at 18:53

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