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Reading "C++ Templates: The Complete Guide" Section 22.5.3

I'm confused over the syntax the author uses for function pointers. I believe this syntax is called the "Function Call Syntax"? I feel like I am missing something here..? I commented the section of the code in question.

template<typename F>
void my_sort(.., F cmp = F())
{
  ..
  if (cmp(x,y)) {..}
  ..
}

//*** WHAT IS THIS SYNTAX? ***
bool my_criterion()(T const& x, T const& y);

// call function with function pointer passed as value argument
my_sort(..., my_criterion);

I replaced all the ..'s with appropriate values and replaced the T to an int in my_criterion() and it still won't compile.

He first mentions this syntax is the section before it:

"As written, the advantage of this functor specification technique is that it is also possible to pass an ordinary function pointer as argument. For example:

bool my_criterion () (T const& x, T const& y);

The code I'm trying to compile based on excerpt from the book:

template<typename F>
void mySort(F cmp)
{
    std::cout << "mySort(F cmp)" << std::endl;
}

bool myCriterion()(int x, int y);

*error C2091: function returns function (referring to myCriterion)

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1  
What is the error message? Also, please post some actual code. –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 27 '11 at 19:41
    
error: C2091: function returns function. I copied the code from the book verbatim. –  Integer Dec 27 '11 at 19:51
    
I mean the code you are actually trying to compile. –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 27 '11 at 19:53
    
On a wild guess without more relevant information the author was probably giving a figurative example of how template arguments can be defaulted. By having F cmp = F() you can either use my_criterion or any other function for comparison in your my_sort template function. This book might be dated as with C++11 you would simply use std::function –  AJG85 Dec 27 '11 at 20:05
    
What's the problem? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 27 '11 at 20:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm going to guess that it's a typo in the book. Quoting from the book:

As written, the advantage of this functor specification technique is that it is also possible to pass an ordinary function pointer as argument. For example:

bool my_criterion () (T const& x, T const& y); 
// call function with function object 
my_sort (… , my_criterion);

The authors are clearly trying to declare and "ordinary function". The pair of parentheses right after the function name shouldn't be there.

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My C++ is a bit rusty, but googling turned this up: The Function Pointer Tutorials

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I suppose what you are missing is a class called Functor:

here is a small example.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>


struct foobar {
  void operator()(int x, int y) {
    std::cout << x << y << std::endl;
  }
};

int main () {
  foobar()(10,20);
  return 0;
}
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