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I have Three different classes that all need to use instances of one class. That one class can also make multiple instances of itself, such as player1, player2 etc, and static won't work for that because it will end up overwriting the old name.

I know that I shouldn't be using the "new" keyword in the last class, but I don't know any other way around it.

public class Test{
    public static void main(String[] args){
        Player player1 = new Player("bob");
        Player player2 = new Player("Hank");
        System.out.println("Original Name: " + player1.getName());
        System.out.println("Original Name 2: " + player2.getName());
        Display dis = new Display();
        dis.disp();

        System.out.println("Changed Name: " + player1.getName());
        System.out.println("Changed Name 2: " + player2.getName());
    }
}

class Player{
    private String pName = "";
    public Player(){}
    public Player(String name){
        pName = name;
    }

    public void setName(String inName){
        pName = inName;
    }

    public String getName(){
        return pName;
    }
}

class Display{
    public void disp(){
        Player player1 = new Player(), player2 = new Player(); //Unneeded
        System.out.println("Player name: " + player1.getName());
        System.out.println("Player name 2: " + player2.getName());

        player1.setName("Joe?");
        player2.setName("Billy?");

        System.out.println("Player new name: " + player1.getName());
        System.out.println("Player new name 2: " + player2.getName());
    }
}
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what exactly are you trying to do? –  Bhushan Dec 27 '11 at 21:00
    
change the players name and keeping it static, but if I use static then player2 will overwrite player1.. –  user1062898 Dec 27 '11 at 21:01
    
What exactly do you want to do with such statement new Player(), player2 = new Player();? –  Lion Dec 27 '11 at 21:02
    
so you mean, the disp() should change the pName of the argument objects and that should be visible in the main()? –  Bhushan Dec 27 '11 at 21:03
    
Yeah, I have the answer already though so thanks anyway. –  user1062898 Dec 27 '11 at 21:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It seems you are trying to modify in Display the same instance of Player you created in Test. If it is indeed the case, you should pass these objects to disp():

public void disp(Player player1, Player player2){
     System.out.println("Player name: " + player1.getName());
     System.out.println("Player name 2: " + player2.getName());

     player1.setName("Joe?");
     player2.setName("Billy?");

     System.out.println("Player new name: " + player1.getName());
     System.out.println("Player new name 2: " + player2.getName());
}

invoking the method will be: dis.disp(player1,player2);

I must indicate that there is some code smell in here, but it seems like a learning proram, so if it is the case, you shouldn't be too worried about it at this stage.

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1  
oh wow, I can't believe I didn't think of that, that was exactly what I needed, thanks. –  user1062898 Dec 27 '11 at 21:04
1  
@user1062898: if amit's post helped you, please up-vote it (as I have done). If it solves your problem then "accept" it by clicking on the check mark to the left of the answer. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Dec 27 '11 at 21:06
1  
Have to wait six minutes / don't have 15 reputation to upvote –  user1062898 Dec 27 '11 at 21:09
    
@user1062898: stick around and you'll have 15 reps in no time. You'll want to give yourself a proper name of course... :) –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Dec 27 '11 at 23:35

Give the Display class two private Player fields and public methods that allow outside classes to interact with the players if need be, including changing names if this is required. You could give the class setPlayer1(Player p) and setPlayer2(Player p) methods, and/or allow the class to accept two Players via constructor parameters.

Whatever you do, you are right to avoid using static variables unless you have a very good reason for doing so.

share|improve this answer

Well, why don't you make a class:

class Display{
    public static void disp(Player player, String newName){
        System.out.println("Player name: " + player.getName());

        player.setName(newName);

        System.out.println("Player new name: " + player.getName());
    }
}

and call:

Display.disp(player1, "Joe?");
Display.disp(player2, "Hank?");

in Test class

so, basically, just make a static method in Display and as a parameter, put appropriate fields.

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