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True random numbers often don't seem random to the average person since randomly generated sequences will be interpreted as structure. Are there any algorithms that generate a set of numbers that psychologically "seem" random, even though they are not?

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@Shalmanese Most music player implement shuffle as playback order, it is not totally random as it will play most of the songs before repetition –  Pradeep Dec 27 '11 at 21:06
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What psychological profile would be used to determine apparent randomness? It sounds more like you want some kind of uniform number generator. –  Tejs Dec 27 '11 at 21:07
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Can you provide the unit test for the PsychoRand() function? –  rene Dec 27 '11 at 21:12
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The human mind is really good at seeing patterns, even where there are none. I suspect that, for any given sequence of numbers, there will always be some set of people who will see structure in that sequence. –  Ferruccio Jan 2 '12 at 15:25
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@userunknown I use foobar2000 in that shuffle do not repeat song. No it is not a contradiction it is only special case of random sequence in which unlikely sequence will be removed which can give appearance of non-randomness to user. Like in total random coint toss T, T, T, T, T has low probability of occurring but it can occur but it will give user perception that it is biased. So for PsychoRand() it will be better to remove possible sequences which are very unlikely just to give appearance of randomness. –  Pradeep Jan 13 '12 at 17:13
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5 Answers

up vote 20 down vote accepted
+100

Here is an algorithm:

  1. Use any Pseudorandom Number Generator to create a sequence of numbers that are not random (because they are pre-determined by the seed and algorithm).

  2. Use a bunch of statistical tests from the Diehard battery (source) to disqualify sub-sequences that are subjectively and historically considered biased.

The output would be "numbers that psychologically "seem" random, even though they are not".

Also, there are cognitive models of human randomness judgement. One such model (of binary sequences) is based on Kolmogorov complexity, but it won't give you an algorithm because Kolmogorov complexity in not computable. However, it might give you more ideas on finding "psychologically random numbers".

Abstract

We present a statistical account of human randomness judgments that uses the idea of algorithmic complexity. We show that an existing measure of the randomness of a sequence corresponds to the assumption that non-random sequences are generated by a particular probabilistic finite state automaton, and use this as the basis for an account that evaluates randomness in terms of the length of programs for machines at different levels of the Chomsky hierarchy. This approach results in a model that predicts human judgments better than the responses of other participants in the same experiment

Griffiths, T. L., & Tenenbaum, J. B. (2003). Probability, algorithmic complexity, and subjective randomness. In R. Alterman & D. Kirsh (Eds.), Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 480-485). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. [PDF]

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Impossible

There is no such thing as a series, which - psychologically - looks random for everybody, but isn't.

We know of the experiment, when people are told to write down a random looking series of coin- or dice results. They often tend to avoid series, but why do they do so? Don't they have enough time, instruments and statistical knowledge, to produce better results? At least if you take enough students with high-school math education absolved, they should be able to detect badly made up series, given enough time and long enough series.

But even without that, a badly educated person can detect a badly made up series by a broken generator design.

Think about a dice, where you always shuffle 6 numbers (2, 6, 1, 4, 3, 5) and pick them in that order, before shuffling again (6, 3, 2, 4, 1, 5) and picking the next 6.

This approach would never lead to 3 identic numbers in series, but in some games it might be very useful, to have for example 3x6 in a row, and of course, over time, it will be apparent, that it never happens, just you used to play this game, and you know, that it normally happens 2-3 times per hour.

Another case where it very early will be obvious is roulette, where people, who believe in their faulty systems, will start to win, and break the bank very early. Such systems often rely on an assumption like "if you have a long series of black, bet on white, because it needs to happen, the more, the longer the black-series is". If you gamble with such expectations, and the generator satisfies your ideas, it will very fast be obvious to the winner, the bank and clever observers, what's going on.

Conclusion:

Detecting a faulty RNG depends on your knowledge, on the length of the series, and on the effort you can spend on the problem, which might raise if you can win or loose much money that way.

There is no common expectation, independent of the knowledge of the audience. Even that the numbers 1 to 6 should - in the long run - occur about equally often, needs to be known, that is not known by intuition.

From short series, nobody can detect whether it is faulty or not. From longer series, a broken RNG will be detectable.

tl;dr

The whole idea of an intentionally broken RNG, to adjust it to badly educated prejudice, is flawed. If you need something as a music shuffler without too early repetition, search a better name for that thing.

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The first thing to consider is how you are using the numbers. Flipping lots of coins will give a pretty good 50/50 split, where flipping two or three coins is apt to give you an annoying non-apparent-random 3 heads or tails too much of the time. Rolling lots of dice looking for ones will give very uneven results, sometimes with no ones at all and sometime with half the dice being ones. Rolling lots more dice will help here. Generally, the more numbers you generate, the happier people will be with them.

If you're only generating a few numbers, I'd start with truly random ones, see what annoys you, and fix it. One simple thing to do is reduce the odds of a number coming up based on how often it has come up before. Or even more simply, don't return the same number twice. But there are often subtleties. If you are returning numbers 1 through 10, but 1-4 count one way and 5-10 the other, a sequence of 123451234512345 will be very annoying (80% low, 20% high). If the ranges are 1-2 and 3-10 it would not be (you get the expected 40% low, 60% high). Worse, if you have competetive die rolls, it's the relative results that matter. The numbers from each die may look, on their own, to be random, but if, 9 times out of 10, one die rolls higher than the other, the dice will seem loaded.

There's a lot more like this. If someone is playing a game where they roll a die to see how far they move, then roll to see how much money they get, a set of rolls that would be psychologically random on their own can give someone no moves and tons of money, or vice versa, and seem seriously rigged.

So I'd generate a random number, or set of numbers, and then reject them if they don't look random enough in that particular case. (You may want to reject it some percentage of the time, or else you may be giving up randomness completely.) (If you're clever, you can adjust the odds in advance and on the fly to minimize the number of regenerations you have to do.) There isn't really a general solution to this problem.

Actually, I can think of two general solutions. One is: just don't use random numbers. The other is to generate vast quantities of them and don't let anyone look at the details of the sequence. If you have a game with 5000 soldiers on each side shooting at each other with a 10% chance of hitting, the overall effect (486 down on one side and 512 down on the other) will be very psychologically random. Just don't let anyone look at the results of, say, 10 individual shots. ("I had 30 shots and not a single hit!" "He had 3 hits in 5 shots!")

Also: I wrote the above, then realized there might be an ethical issue here. If you are generating a random map, or doing lots of other things, rigging the results of random number generation can be a very good idea. However, a player in a game may have a right to a real random number. If you have a poker game, and a real random deal gives a player a royal flush, your program has no business deciding that that's too extreme and redealing. A war game player deciding to make an attack with a supposed 50-50 chance of success should not be blindsided by the fact that, because previously he has won 3 50-50 contests in a row, his real odds are now only 20-80. The ethics aspect here could probably fill a book which I don't have time to write, but be very aware of it.

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There are two requirements in your question.

  1. Psychologically seems random
  2. Not really random

You need to define both of these requirements a lot better. I propose we define the requirements like this:

  1. A user will always be able to find sequences in a set of random numbers if the set is long enough. It can even be mathematically proven that you can find any given subsequence of numbers in a random data stream. Therefore, a user will almost certainly find a random subsequence.
  2. However, you do not want the stream to be really random. This means you want the computer to be able to predict the next number.

I propose the following algorithm:

NEXT = RandomStartingNumber
X = empty list
loop {
   NEXT = HASH(NEXT)
   add NEXT to X
}

This would make the data appear random, while it can actually be calculated by the computer quite easily.

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This seems like a straightforward solution to a straightforward problem; not sure if it's what the OP was getting at, but it's certainly worth tucking away. –  Tim Parenti Jan 8 '12 at 4:45
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The RNG code below (written in c#) generates some very random looking numbers:

public class Randomizer
{
    /// <summary>
    /// An array of unsigned integers containing 100 pre-rolled randomly generated numbers.
    /// </summary>
    private uint[] randBuf = new uint[100];

    /// <summary>
    /// The index of the last read number out of the <see cref="Atlana.Random.Randomizer.randBuf">randBuf</see> array.
    /// </summary>
    private uint index = 0;

    /// <summary>
    /// Original value of the seed used to initialize the number array.
    /// </summary>
    private uint origSeed;

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the Randomizer class. Uses <paramref name="seed">seed</paramref> to initialize the number array.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="seed">Integer value used to seed the number array.</param>
    public Randomizer(int seed)
    {
        this.origSeed = (uint)seed;
        this.Initialize((uint)seed);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Invokes the randomizer to refresh the list of random values.
    /// </summary>
    public void ReRoll()
    {
        this.Roll();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Generates a random unsigned integer number value between the specified range of <paramref name="min">min</paramref> and <paramref name="max">max</paramref>.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="min">An unsigned integer representing the minimum value of the return value.</param>
    /// <param name="max">An unsigned integer representing the maximum value of the return value.</param>
    /// <returns>An unsigned integer containing a number between <paramref name="min">min</paramref> and <paramref name="max">max</paramref>.</returns>
    public uint Range(uint min, uint max)
    {
        uint y = this.Random();
        if (y < min)
        {
            y = y * min;
        }

        if (y > max)
        {
            y = y % (max + 1);
        }

        return y;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Generates a random integer number value between the specified range of <paramref name="min">min</paramref> and <paramref name="max">max</paramref>.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="min">An integer representing the minimum value of the return value.</param>
    /// <param name="max">An integer representing the maximum value of the return value.</param>
    /// <returns>An integer containing a number between <paramref name="min">min</paramref> and <paramref name="max">max</paramref>.</returns>
    public int Range(int min, int max)
    {
        return Convert.ToInt32(this.Range(Convert.ToUInt32(min), Convert.ToUInt32(max)));
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Generates a random number between 0 and 100.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>A randomly generated integer value between 0 and 100.</returns>
    public int Percent()
    {
        return this.Range(0, 100);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Retrieves a value from the random number array.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>A randomly generated unsigned integer</returns>
    private uint Random()
    {
        if (this.index == 0)
        {
            this.Roll();
        }

        uint y = this.randBuf[this.index];
        y = y ^ (y >> 11);
        y = y ^ ((y << 7) + 3794);
        y = y ^ ((y << 15) + 815);
        y = y ^ (y >> 18);
        this.index = (this.index + 1) % 100;
        return y;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes the number array from a seed provided by <paramref name="seed">seed</paramref>.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="seed">Unsigned integer value used to seed the number array.</param>
    private void Initialize(uint seed)
    {
        this.randBuf[0] = seed;
        for (uint i = 1; i < 100; i++)
        {
            this.randBuf[i] = (uint)(this.randBuf[i - 1] >> 1) + i;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Checks to prevent <see cref="System.ArithmeticException">ArithmeticException</see>.
    /// </summary>
    private void OverflowCheck()
    {
        foreach (uint u in this.randBuf)
        {
            if (u > (uint.MaxValue / 3794))
            {
                this.Initialize(this.origSeed + this.index);
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Refreshes the list of values in the random number array.
    /// </summary>
    private void Roll()
    {
        this.OverflowCheck();
        for (uint i = 0; i < 99; i++)
        {
            uint y = this.randBuf[i + 1] * 3794U;
            this.randBuf[i] = (((y >> 10) + this.randBuf[i]) ^ this.randBuf[(i + 399) % 100]) + i;
            if ((this.randBuf[i] % 2) == 1)
            {
                this.randBuf[i] = (this.randBuf[i + 1] << 21) ^ (this.randBuf[i + 1] * (this.randBuf[i + 1] & 30));
            }
        }
    }
}

Here is an example of a series of numbers between 0-50 using the above class:

7 2 6 4 17 1 48 18 46 14 44 32 37 12 48 12 14 47 15 10 5 12 15 9 9 15 27 47 5 5
2 16 20 48 50 22 31 39 40 20 41 27 35 50 46 21 8 34 24 6
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How would a series of 20 values from (0, 1) look like? Btw. - it doesn't look very random to me. See how late the first number between 20 and 29 arrives! About every 5th number should be in this range! –  user unknown Jan 9 '12 at 8:07
    
Zero of 50 numbers ending in "3" seems a bit suspicious too. –  user unknown Jan 9 '12 at 8:15
    
"it doesn't look random to me" Personal oppinion isn't really worth a vote down. Aside from that I've given code which shows a proven algorithm for generating random numbers. So while my answer may not have been exceptionally helpful, it wasn't completely off from the given question. –  doogle Jan 9 '12 at 13:27
    
Please describe how to differentiate between "personal opinion" and "psychologically random numbers" and note, that I explained my judgement with "no number ending in 3". –  user unknown Jan 9 '12 at 14:20
    
Given the set and taking in consideration that 37 is popularly known as the world's most random number, the algorithm I've used is quite proficient in providing a set of psychologically random numbers. That said, unless you can compute the probability given a set of infinite numbers, with a pseudo-random sequence, that a subset randomly chosen would not only contain, but END in 3, your comment is just an opinion. –  doogle Jan 9 '12 at 15:43
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