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I am trying to implement a wating animation of the kind mentioned in this question, particularly something that looks like this:

enter image description here

But I do not want to use graphic files, and am trying to implement it purely in html5 canvas and javascript. Also, I want a circular black background rather than a square one. As a first step, I tried to draw a static frame (without any movement/rotation) and did this:

<html>
<head><script>
window.onload = function(){
    var c=document.getElementById("waiting").getContext("2d");
    c.lineCap="round";
    c.fillStyle="#353535";
    c.translate(100,100);
    function slit(p){
        shade = 256*p;
        th = 2*Math.PI*p;
        cos = Math.cos(th);
        sin = Math.sin(th);
        c.strokeStyle = '#'+((shade<<16)+(shade<<8)+shade).toString(16);
        c.moveTo(55*cos, 55*sin);
        c.lineTo(84*cos, 84*sin);
        c.stroke();
        c.closePath();
    }
    c.lineWidth=0;
    c.arc(0,0,100,0,Math.PI*2);
    c.fill();
    c.lineWidth=7;
    for(var i = 0;i<1;i+=0.05){slit(i);}
}
</script></head>
<body><canvas id="waiting" width=200 height=200></canvas></body>
</html>

The result I get is:

enter image description here

The problem is that, the lineCap="round" is not working correctly for all of the "slits", and the lineWidth=0 attribute is not working for the edge of the circle. What am I doing wrong? I checked it with Chrome 16.0.912.63 and Firefox 10.0, and got similar results.


For the next step, I am going to let parts of the functions that I created above interact with

window.animationFrames = (function(callback){
    return window.requestAnimationFrame ||
    window.webkitRequestAnimationFrame ||
    window.mozRequestAnimationFrame ||
    window.oRequestAnimationFrame ||
    window.msRequestAnimationFrame ||
    function(callback){window.setTimeout(callback, 1000 / 60);};
 })();

but for the time being, I need to solve this problem first.

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1  
here is a jQuery plugin for doing the same thing: fgnass.github.com/spin.js, but you want to do this as a learning experience then that's cool –  asawilliams Dec 27 '11 at 22:10
    
@asawilliams I see. Thanks for the link. I did not want to rely on external libraries, but I will take a look at it. Maybe I can extract and study the relevant parts of it. But still, I want to know why my code above does not work as intended. –  sawa Dec 27 '11 at 22:13
    
@asawilliams The implementation that you linked seems to work without jQuery. I will look at it deeper. –  sawa Dec 27 '11 at 22:17
    
fwiw, the link provided by @asawilliams doesn't require jQuery or Zepto, but it supports them if they are present by creating plugins. there is, however, a core API that is available if you don't want the dependency. –  keeganwatkins Dec 27 '11 at 22:26
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There's a bit of confusion here.

Zero is not an acceptable value for line width. The spec dictates that if you say lineWidth = 0 that it will be a no-op.

Furthermore you are not using lineWidth there because you are not stroking. fill() does not take line width into account.

As for the other issue, all you have to do is call beginPath! See here:

http://jsfiddle.net/JfcDL/

Just adding the beginPath call and you'll get this with your code:

enter image description here

What you were doing incorrectly was drawing the entire path so far with every new stroke(). You need to call beginPath to open a new one so that the stroke only applies to the last part and not all the parts made so far.

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Great. Thank you. It helped. –  sawa Dec 28 '11 at 1:05
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Thanks to the help by the several people here, I finally came up with this code, which works fully with the movement:

<html>
<head><script>
var r1 =  400;
var r2 =  340;
var r3 = 220;
var slitWidth = 40;
var speed = 0.0004;
var attenuation = 1.7;

function rgbToHex(r, g, b){
    return '#' + ((1 << 24) + (r << 16) + (g << 8) + b).toString(16).slice(1);
}

window.nextFrame = (function(callback){
    return window.requestAnimationFrame ||
    window.webkitRequestAnimationFrame ||
    window.mozRequestAnimationFrame ||
    window.oRequestAnimationFrame ||
    window.msRequestAnimationFrame ||
    function(callback){window.setTimeout(callback, 1000 / 60);};
})();

window.onload = function(){
    var waiting=document.getElementById('waiting').getContext('2d');
    function slit(d,p){
        shade = Math.round(Math.pow(1-(d+p)%1, attenuation)*255)
        th = Math.PI*2*(p);
        cos = Math.cos(th);
        sin = Math.sin(th);
        waiting.strokeStyle = rgbToHex(shade, shade, shade);
        waiting.beginPath();
        waiting.moveTo(r2*cos, r2*sin);
        waiting.lineTo(r3*cos, r3*sin);
        waiting.stroke();
        waiting.closePath();
    }
    function frame(){
        waiting.arc(0,0,r1,0,Math.PI*2);
        waiting.fill();
        var time = new Date().getTime()* speed;
        for(var p = 1;p>0;p-=0.05){slit(time,p);}
        nextFrame(function(){frame();});
    }
    waiting.lineCap='round';
    waiting.lineWidth=slitWidth;
    waiting.fillStyle='#353535';
    waiting.translate(r1, r1);
    frame();
}
</script></head>
<body><canvas id='waiting' width=800 height=800></canvas></body>
</html>
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