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I've stumbled in a JavaScript situation where bitwise operators were used. Logically, a bitwise operator should have a higher precedence than an equality operator, e.g.

if val & 10 == 10
   alert('flag set')

But it looks like that this code would work the other way, as in JavaScript bitwise operators have lower precedence than equality operators do (see Mozilla's JS reference). The code above would always return 0 for any valid numerical val, because the result of val & true is 0. So, the proper way would be to put parenthesis around bitwise expression:

if (val & 10) == 10
   alert('flag set')

I dug up the history of the question and it seems like this behaviour comes from the age of K&R's C, where logical && and || operators were added after bitwise ones. In terms of logical statement in C:

if (x == 1 & y == 0) {
    /* ... */
}

Makes perfect sense. But it doesn't make any in terms of bitwise logic.

C++, Java, Objective-C, PHP, C# and finally Javascript have it the same way. Python, Ruby, Go have it the other way around.

Do you know any reasons (apart from the one that comes from C's heritage) which made programming languages' designers to follow C's precedence rules?

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closed as not constructive by larsmans, lwburk, artbristol, Paul R, Graviton Dec 28 '11 at 8:04

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Who claims that the whole-value boolean operators were added to C after the bitwise ones? –  larsmans Dec 27 '11 at 22:05
9  
lysator.liu.se/c/dmr-on-or.html –  BasicWolf Dec 27 '11 at 22:07
    
Ok, convincing enough :) –  larsmans Dec 27 '11 at 22:09

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