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I've got this code finally working with a single argument on my command line, i.e. one file for it to work with, although I designed the code with the concept of it working with an unlimited number of files. What it does is take some X number of text files containing words separated by spaces, and replaces spaces with \n thus creating a list of words. Though, it successfully completes the first argument, it just ignores the 2nd.

Another minor problem seems that it also prints out some garbage letter at the end, a Y with two dots above it; I assume some EOF symbol, yet I can't seem to stop that happening!

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    FILE *fpIn, *fpOut;
    int i, j;
    j = 1;
    char c;
    char myString[256];

    printf("%d", argc);
    printf("\n");
    printf("The following arguments were passed to main(): ");
                for(i=1; i<argc; i++) printf("%s ", argv[i]);
    printf("\n");

    while(argc--) {
        for(i = 1; i < argc; i++) {
            fpIn = fopen(argv[j], "rb");
            snprintf(myString, 256, "%s~[%d]", argv[j], i);
            fpOut= fopen(myString, "wb");
            while (c != EOF) {
                c = fgetc(fpIn);
                if (isspace(c)) 
                    c = '\n';
                fputc(c, fpOut );
            }
            j++;
        }
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of Working with Text Files Two. Your accepted answer on that question explains why you're getting that extra garbage character. Your code continues to be incorrect in this question. –  Greg Hewgill Dec 27 '11 at 23:56
    
Yep that was my previous post, I've made some progress though, but usually dont get responses on older posts, so I thought I could make another :) –  PnP Dec 27 '11 at 23:57
    
I don't really understand why, if Im honest –  PnP Dec 27 '11 at 23:58
1  
In short, consider the rule: Never write the EOF value to a file. Now, how might that happen in your code? (It does, you'll have to figure out how and fix it.) –  Greg Hewgill Dec 27 '11 at 23:59
    
I still cant seem to get it working for multiple arguments though :/ –  PnP Dec 28 '11 at 0:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The getchar(), getc() and fgetc() functions (or macros) return an int, not a char.

You must use:

int c;

while ((c = fgetc(fpIn)) != EOF)
{
    if (isspace(c))
        c = '\n';
    fputc(c, fpOut);
}

Think about it; the functions must be able to return any valid char and EOF (which is distinct from any valid char value. So, by definition, the return value can't be a char...

What happens if you use char?

  • Your original code didn't initialize c before testing it (so the loop might break early).
  • Your code didn't test c immediately after reading EOF (so it might print a garbage character, often ÿ, LATIN SMALL LETTER Y WITH DIAERESIS, U+00FF).
  • If your char type is unsigned, you'd never see EOF.
  • If your char type is signed, some valid characters (often ÿ again)) will be misinterpreted as EOF.

I still can't seem to get it working for multiple arguments though.

The problem there is the double loop you have running:

int i, j;
j = 1;

while (argc--)
{
    for (i = 1; i < argc; i++)
    {
        fpIn = fopen(argv[j], "rb");
        ...process fpIn...
        j++;
    }
}

Let us suppose you invoke the command with two file names; then argc == 3.

After the first time past the while loop, argc == 2. You then do a for loop with i taking the value 1; you open argv[1] (because j == 1). You process that file; then increment j to 2, before also incrementing i, also to 2. The second time around the for loop, i == 2 as does argc, so the for loop terminates. The while loop decrements argc again to 1, but tests that 2 != 0. However, the for loop sets i = 1 and then terminates because i == argc. The while loop decrements argc to 1, and repeats.

You can use a while loop or a for loop, but you don't need both.

So, either:

for (i = i; i < argc; i++)
{
    ...process argv[i]...
}

Or:

while (--argc > 0)
{
    ...process *++argv...
}

I'd use the for loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I added a check to see whether it was EOF within my current loop, if ( c == EOF) {break;} That fixed it! –  PnP Dec 28 '11 at 0:15
    
I still cant seem to get it working for multiple arguments though :/ –  PnP Dec 28 '11 at 0:20

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