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I have a class Card which stores 2 ints that represent the rank and suit. And I have a class Deck, which contains 52 Card objects stored in an Array. When I initialise the deck, I create all 52 cards and add then to the deck.

when I do this should I use

deck[i] = Card (rank, suit);

or

deck[i] = new Card (rank, suit);

Why would I want to use one or the other?

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11  
Memory management in C++ is a complicated matter. People write books about it. You should read them. –  Sergio Tulentsev Dec 28 '11 at 0:25
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5 Answers 5

If deck is an array of Card, then you want the first: deck[i] = Card (rank, suit);

If deck is an array of Card*, then you want the second: deck[i] = new Card (rank, suit);

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And in the latter case, you want wrongly. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 26 '12 at 13:13
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Because one is valid, one is not.

If your array contains objects,

deck[i] = Card (rank, suit);

is valid.

If your array contains pointers to objects,

deck[i] = new Card (rank, suit);

is valid.

If you'd try to compile, you'd see you're getting an error for one of them. The other is the one you want.

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Provided that you declare the deck array appropriately for each case, both options you suggest are valid. Let me discuss the benefits of each option:

deck[i] = Card (rank, suit);

  • No need to manage memory, since all the allocations are implicit and managed by the compiler. Working with pointers would require a bit more effort.
  • Assuming the Card class is straightforward, the default copy and assignment logic generated by the compiler will suffice, you can just work with Card instances pretty much as if they were a primitive type in terms of assigning them or passing them as arguments.
  • With careful use of references you may be able to reduce the copying of instances and minimize the performance penalty associated with that.

deck[i] = new Card (rank, suit);

  • Each card is unique through the life of the game. It would be probably easier to model the game with unique cards that are never duplicated.
  • More efficient. Passing a card as an argument just passes a pointer, no matter how big each Card instance is, likewise for moving cards between different arrays. Compare to the other case, where moving a Card instance by value would require copying the whole contents of the class from one location in memory to another.
  • It might be easier to debug the state of the game if the cards are unique and never copied.

In my opinion there isn't a clear advantage to either method, even more so if the Card class is so small. I would probably go with pointers myself, but the use of objects is not a bad option either.

Good luck.

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In this case there are advantages and disadvantages to using an array of Card or an array of Card*. For an array of pointers you will need to delete every pointer manually before deleting the array (to prevent memory leak). This would also use up a very tiny bit more space in the memory. As an advantage, it would be easy to swap two cards, for example, as you would only swap the pointers. If you had objects, to swap you would either need to modify them or construct new objects (which can be expensive). Decks could also share cards if you chose pointers ( i don't know why you would use this in this particular case, but is useful to be aware of for the sake of generality).

You would not need to worry about the memory management if you had an array of objects, but you would lose this fast swapping ability.

It depends on you to assess which one is better for the application, but i personally think you would be fine with the array of objects.

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I answered the literal question, but this likely what the asker is looking for. –  Donald Miner Dec 28 '11 at 1:06
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If you declare an array of Card items, then the items will be default-constructed when the array is allocated, and then you have to go back and update the individual Card items with their new values afterwards, eg:

Card deck[52];
for (int i = 0; i < 52; ++i)
{
    rank = ...;
    suit = ...;
    deck[i] = Card(rank, suit);

    // better, add a method to the `Card` class to
    // update the values without constructing any
    // temporary instances at all...
    //
    // deck[i].set(rank, suit);
}

If you declare an array of Card pointers, then you can use your Card constructor to initialize each Card item with the desired values, but at the cost of allocating a separate memory block for each Card item, eg:

Card* deck[52];
for (int i = 0; i < 52; ++i)
{
    rank = ...;
    suit = ...;
    deck[i] = new Card(rank, suit);
}

You can combine the two if you use a std::vector instead of an array, eg:

std::vector<Card> deck(52);
for (int i = 0; i < 52; ++i)
{
    rank = ...;
    suit = ...;
    deck[i] = Card(rank, suit);

    // or:
    // deck[i].set(rank, suit);
}

If you use the placement new operator, then you can actually utilize the 'new' operator to call your Card constructor without allocating a separate memory block for each Card, and without having to default-construct and then separately copy-assign the Card values, eg:

unsigned char deck_buffer[sizeof(Card) * 52];
Card *deck = (Card*) deck_buffer;
for (int i = 0; i < 52; ++i)
{
    rank = ...;
    suit = ...;
    new (&deck[i]) Card(rank, suit); 
}
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