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I want to convert a string like this:

"asd foo bar ( lol bla ( gee bee ) lee ) ree"

to a list like this:

["asd","foo","bar",["lol","bla",["gee","bee"],"lee"],"ree"]

Is there an easy solution?

edit: It should work for any number and depth of parantheses, but it only has to work for valid strings (no single parantheses)

edit2: Spaces can be seen as delimiters, if it doesn't match it may raise an error or just not work, I don't care. It just has to work for well-formed strings.

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you need to define it more, e.g. can string have space or not, or we can treat any space as delimtter, should it raise error if mismatched parantheses? – Anurag Uniyal Dec 28 '11 at 2:06
    
done. (Spaces can be seen as delimiters, if it doesn't match it may raise an error or just not work, I don't care. It just has to work for well-formed strings.) – L3viathan Dec 28 '11 at 2:08
up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can use Python's parser to do the job. Just help it a little:

>>> a = "asd foo bar ( lol bla ( gee bee ) lee ) ree"
>>> eval(str(a.split()).replace("'(',", '[').replace("')'",']'))
['asd', 'foo', 'bar', ['lol', 'bla', ['gee', 'bee'], 'lee'], 'ree']

If you need it to be safe, use ast.literal_eval instead!

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Thanks, almost works. Just a little mistake in the second replace method (paranthesis and bracket are swapped) – L3viathan Dec 28 '11 at 2:13
    
Sorry, I edited it later :). Now it works – JBernardo Dec 28 '11 at 2:14

Pyparsing comes with a built-in helper method, nestedExpr:

>>> from pyparsing import nestedExpr
>>> a = "asd foo bar ( lol bla ( gee bee ) lee ) ree"
>>> # have to put total string into ()'s
>>> printed nestedExpr().parseString("(%s)" % a).asList()[0]
['asd', 'foo', 'bar', ['lol', 'bla', ['gee', 'bee'], 'lee'], 'ree']

The only trick here is that, to keep the parser simple, the whole string has to be wrapped inside a pair of ()'s. The default delimiters for nestedExpr are ()'s, but can be any other pair of strings or pyparsing expressions.

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