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class Package:
    def __init__(self):
        self.files = []

    # ...

    def __del__(self):
        for file in self.files:
            os.unlink(file)

__del__(self) above fails with an AttributeError exception. I understand Python doesn't guarantee the existence of "global variables" (member data in this context?) when __del__() is invoked. If that is the case and this is the reason for the exception, how do I make sure the object destructs properly?

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2  
Reading what you linked, global variables going away doesn't seem to apply here unless you're talking about when you program is exiting, during which I guess according to what you linked it might be POSSIBLE that the os module itself is already gone. Otherwise, I don't think it applies to member variables in a __del__() method. –  Kevin Anderson May 14 '09 at 19:13
2  
The exception is thrown long before my program exits. The AttributeError exception I get is Python saying it doesn't recognize self.files as being an attribute of Package. I may be getting this wrong, but if by "globals" they don't mean variables global to methods (but possibly local to class) then I don't know what causes this exception. Google hints Python reserves the right to clean up member data before __del__(self) is called. –  wilhelmtell May 14 '09 at 19:19
    
The code as posted seems to work for me (with Python 2.5). Can you post the actual code that is failing - or a simplified (the simpler the better version that still causes the error? –  Silverfish May 14 '09 at 19:49
    
@ wilhelmtell can you give a more concrete example? In all my tests, the del destructor works perfectly. –  Unknown May 14 '09 at 20:07
    
The class is not very different from what I posted, but it's used in a much larger chunk of code that is too large for these margins to contain... I'll try and find the smallest code that triggers this. –  wilhelmtell May 14 '09 at 20:24

7 Answers 7

up vote 208 down vote accepted

I'd recommend using Python's with statement for managing resources that need to be cleaned up. The problem with using an explicit close() statement is that you have to worry about people forgetting to call it at all or forgetting to place it in a finally block to prevent a resource leak when an exception occurs.

To use the with statement, create a class with the following methods:

  def __enter__(self)
  def __exit__(self, type, value, traceback)

In your example above, you'd use

class Package:
    def __init__(self):
        self.files = []

    def __enter__(self):
        return self

    # ...

    def __exit__(self, type, value, traceback):
        for file in self.files:
            os.unlink(file)

Then, when someone wanted to use your class, they'd do the following:

with Package() as package_obj:
    # use package_obj

The variable package_obj will be an instance of type Package (it's the value returned by the __enter__ method). Its __exit__ method will automatically be called, regardless of whether or not an exception occurs.

You could even take this approach a step further. In the example above, someone could still instantiate Package using its constructor without using the with clause. You don't want that to happen. You can fix this by creating a PackageResource class that defines the __enter__ and __exit__ methods. Then, the Package class would be defined strictly inside the __enter__ method and returned. That way, the caller never could instantiate the Package class without using a with statement:

class PackageResource:
    def __enter__(self):
        class Package:
            ...
        self.package_obj = Package()
        return self.package_obj

    def __exit__(self, type, value, traceback):
        self.package_obj.cleanup()

You'd use this as follows:

with PackageResource() as package_obj:
    # use package_obj
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10  
Technically speaking, one could call PackageResource().__enter__() explicitly and thus create a Package that would never be finalized... but they'd really have to be trying to break the code. Probably not something to worry about. –  David Z May 14 '09 at 20:15
1  
By the way, if you're using Python 2.5, you'll need to do from future import with_statement to be able to use the with statement. –  Clint Miller May 14 '09 at 20:39
    
I found an article which helps to show why __del__() acts the way it does and give credence to using a context manager solution: andy-pearce.com/blog/posts/2013/Apr/python-destructor-drawbacks –  eikonomega Jan 15 '14 at 20:53
1  
@snooze92 you could give the Resource an __init__ method that stores *args and **kwargs in self, and then passes them on to the inner class in the enter method. When using the with statement, __init__ is called before __enter__ –  Brian Schlenker Feb 6 '14 at 17:32
1  
@snooze92 It really depends on what you want to do, I don't think one way is more pythonic than the other. Let's say you were wrapping a function that took many parameters and you didn't want to have to replicate all those parameters in your wrapper. That's when I would use *args and **kwargs, to simplify my programming process. In your case I would probably prefer to be explicit with the parameters as well. –  Brian Schlenker Feb 7 '14 at 14:42

I don't think that it's possible for instance members to be removed before __del__ is called. My guess would be that the reason for your particular AttributeError is somewhere else (maybe you mistakenly remove self.file elsewhere).

However, as the others pointed out, you should avoid using __del__. The main reason for this is that instances with __del__ will not be garbage collected (they will only be freed when their refcount reaches 0). Therefore, if your instances are involved in circular references, they will live in memory for as long as the application run. (I may be mistaken about all this though, I'd have to read the gc docs again, but I'm rather sure it works like this).

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2  
Objects with del can be garbage collected if their reference count from other objects with del is zero and they are unreachable. This means if you have a reference cycle between objects with del, none of those will be collected. Any other case, however, should be resolved as expected. –  Collin Jun 12 '13 at 0:49
    
Also, sorry about the bold. Everywhere where there is bold, imagine two underscores before and after it. Oh, stackoverflow comment formatting! –  Collin Jun 12 '13 at 0:50
1  
@Collin You can escape them. E.g. using slashes before each gives __ :) –  Thomas Dec 14 '14 at 1:54

I think problem could be in __init__ (if there more code than shown).

__del__ will be called even __init__ is not executed properly/throw exception.

Source

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2  
Sounds very likely. The best way to avoid this problem when using __del__ is to explicitly declare all members at class-level, ensuring that they always exist, even if __init__ fails. In the given example, files = () would work, though mostly you'd just assign None; in either case, you still need to assign the real value in __init__. –  Søren Løvborg Mar 8 '13 at 6:46

Just wrap your destructor with a try/except statement and it will not throw an exception if your globals are already disposed of.

Edit

Try this:

from weakref import proxy

class MyList(list): pass

class Package:
    def __init__(self):
        self.__del__.im_func.files = MyList([1,2,3,4])
        self.files = proxy(self.__del__.im_func.files)

    def __del__(self):
        print self.__del__.im_func.files

It will stuff the file list in the del function that is guaranteed to exist at the time of call. The weakref proxy is to prevent Python, or yourself from deleting the self.files variable somehow (if it is deleted, then it will not affect the original file list). If it is not the case that this is being deleted even though there are more references to the variable, then you can remove the proxy encapsulation.

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2  
The problem is that if the member data is gone it's too late for me. I need that data. See my code above: I need the filenames to know which files to remove. I simplified my code though, there are other data I need to clean up myself (i.e. the interpreter won't know how to clean). –  wilhelmtell May 14 '09 at 19:13
    
This solution worked remarkably well in my case. –  gaborous Feb 27 at 19:12

It seems that the idiomatic way to do this is to provide a close() method (or similar), and call it explicitely.

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15  
This is the approach I used before, but I ran into other problems with it. With exceptions thrown all over the place by other libraries, I need Python's help in cleaning up the mess in the case of an error. Specifically, I need Python to call the destructor for me, because otherwise the code becomes quickly unmanageable, and I will surely forget an exit-point where a call to .close() should be. –  wilhelmtell May 14 '09 at 19:16

As an appendix to Clint's answer, you can simplify PackageResource using contextlib.contextmanager:

@contextlib.contextmanager
def packageResource():
    class Package:
        ...
    package = Package()
    yield package
    package.cleanup()

Alternatively, though probably not as Pythonic, you can override Package.__new__:

class Package(object):
    def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs):
        @contextlib.contextmanager
        def packageResource():
            # adapt arguments if superclass takes some!
            package = super(Package, cls).__new__(cls)
            package.__init__(*args, **kwargs)
            yield package
            package.cleanup()

    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        ...

and simply use with Package(...) as package.

To get things shorter, name your cleanup function close and use contextlib.closing, in which case you can either use the unmodified Package class via with contextlib.closing(Package(...)) or override it's __new__ to the simpler

class Package(object):
    def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs):
        package = super(Package, cls).__new__(cls)
        package.__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        return contextlib.closing(package)
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Maybe, and I haven't tried this, if you really need to clean up the content of self.files then perhaps you can wrap each content in self.files in a class. The wrapper class containing a del method to delete itself.

*shrug

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