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I need to work out the algorithm regarding how you calculate the network and host portion of an IP address.

First question- Is the host ID the public part? Is the network ID the private part for locating the computer within the local network?

Second question- If the subnet mask is a value smaller than 255 the corresponding octet in the IP address must be broken down into binary to determine which part of the number is the host ID and which portion is the network ID. Is the result binary number always split in two?

(e.g. An IP address of 192.168.33.22 with a subnet mask of 255.255.224.0 means that the octet holding 33 be broken down as follows: 0010|0001 indicating that 0010 is the network ID portion and 0001 is the host ID portion?)

Thank you in advance for any help.

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3 Answers 3

  • Is the host ID the public part? Is the network ID the private part for locating the computer within the local network?

The host and network portions of an ip address have nothing to do with public and private.

  • If the subnet mask is a value smaller than 255 the corresponding octet in the IP address must be broken down into binary to determine which part of the number is the host ID and which portion is the network ID. Is the result binary number always split in two? ...a subnet mask of 255.255.224.0 means that the octet holding 33 be broken down as follows: 0010|0001...

Your example is wrong. Specifically, you assume that 224 has four consecutive binary bits in it when you spit the 33 octet as 0010|0001 (where | is the division between network and host)...

The octet in the subnet mask containing 224 has three consecutive binary 1s in it: 11100000. Therefore the "network portion" of the whole IP address is: 192.168.32.0. The "host portion" of the ip address is 0.0.1.22. Using your notation, the third octet of ip 192.168.33.22 (mask 255.255.224.0) is: 001|00001.

To get the network portion of an IP address, you must perform a binary AND of the ip address and its netmask. The host portion is a binary AND of the inverted netmask (bits flipped between 0 and 1).

EDIT

Let's make another example to address your comment:

IP Address 192.168.255.22, NetMask 255.255.224.0

The network portion of this address is 192.168.224.0 and the host portion of the address is 0.0.31.22. I intentionally chose the numbers in the example to make the math as obvious as possible. Please convert 224 and 31 to binary, it should make things clear. If not, please reference the wikipedia article on subnetting

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Hi Mike, I am not sure I follow the last portion about the network and host ID portion. Are you saying that because the binary version of 224 is 11100000, the network portion with be the part corresponding with the three 1's? and the host ID portion is the section associated with the 0's? Thanks again for your explanation. –  fwc Dec 29 '11 at 2:10
    
@fwc, please check my edit –  Mike Pennington Dec 29 '11 at 8:41
    
yes, that answers my question. it seems the algorithm uses 1s part of the binary from the subnet mask. this would mean that the same IP address from my example with the third octet as 31 would have a host ID of 0.0.31.22. Correct me if I am wrong here. –  fwc Dec 31 '11 at 4:05
    
@fwc, you're wrong. Read what I said in my answer about 192.168.33.22 and mask 255.255.224.0 –  Mike Pennington Dec 31 '11 at 4:26
    
@MikePennington- I would calculate it as follows: subnet mask for the third octet is still 11100000, so the binary for 33 is 00011111; therefore the it would split as follows 000|11111 where the line is the divider between the network and host ID, or am i still missing something? –  fwc Dec 31 '11 at 18:38

You can use the following script:

#!/bin/sh
GetNumericIP()
{
    ipbin=0
    for part in `echo $1 | awk -F'.' '{print $1 " " $2 " " $3 " " $4}'`
    do
        ipbin=`expr $ipbin \* 256`
        ipbin=`expr $ipbin + $part`
    done
    echo "$ipbin"
}
GetSrtingIP()
{
    ipbin=$1
    count=0
    while [ $count -le 3 ]
    do
        rem=`expr $ipbin % 256`
        ipbin=`expr $ipbin / 256`
        if [ -z "$ipstr" ]
        then
            ipstr=$rem
        else
            ipstr=`echo ${rem}.${ipstr}`
        fi
        count=`expr $count + 1`
    done
    echo $ipstr
}
mask=$2
maskbin=`GetNumericIP $mask`
ip=$1
ipbin=`GetNumericIP $ip`
networkid=$(( $maskbin & $ipbin ))
networkid=`GetSrtingIP $networkid`
echo "networkid = $networkid"
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You're over-complicating things.

IPv4 addresses (and subnet masks) are merely displayed in dot-decimal notation simply as a means of making them more readable to humans. Within the computer, they are simply 4 bytes of contiguous memory (often stored, for example, within a long int):

Stored in computer:    11000000 10101000 00100001 00010110
Displayed for human:        192.     168.      33.      22

Stored in computer:    11111111 11111111 11100000 00000000
Displayed for human:        255.     255.     224.       0

The 1s in the mask indicate bits that identify the network address, thus one merely need use a bitwise AND operation to extract the network address part:

address   11000000 10101000 00100001 00010110    192.168.33.22
mask      11111111 11111111 11100000 00000000    255.255.224.0
(AND)     -----------------------------------    -------------
network   11000000 10101000 00100000 00000000    192.168.32.0
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