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Let's say I have 1000 files to read and because of some limits, I want to read maximum 5 files in parallel. And, as soon as one of them is finished, I want a new one starts.

I have a main function who have the list of the files and I try changing a counter whenever one thread is finished. but it doesn't works!

Any suggestion?

The following is the main function loop

for (final File filename : folder.listFiles()) {

Object lock1 = new Object();
new myThread(filename, lock1).start();
counter++;
while (counter > 5);
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Spawning threads like this is not the way to go. Use an ExecutorService and specify the pool to be 5. Put all the files in something like a BlockingQueue or another thread-safe collection and all the executing ones can just poll() it at will.

public class ThreadReader {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    File f = null;//folder
    final BlockingQueue<File> queue = new ArrayBlockingQueue<File>(1000);
    for(File kid : f.listFiles()){
        queue.add(kid);
    }

    ExecutorService pool = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(5);

    for(int i = 1; i <= 5; i++){
        Runnable r = new Runnable(){
        public void run() {
            File workFile = null;
            while((workFile = queue.poll()) != null){
                //work on the file.
            }

        }
    };

        pool.execute(r);
    }

}

}

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+1. No sense reinventing the wheel. I think you mean ThreadPoolExecutor, though. There is no ExecutorPool in J2SE that I know of. –  Ted Hopp Dec 28 '11 at 3:19
    
Jdk5 onwards there are lot of inbuit classes for thread handling. As kylar suggested it is better to use Executorpool –  Nambari Dec 28 '11 at 3:21
    
Yeah I meant ExecutorService actually. Fixed and added SUPER rough source code to give you the gist. –  Kylar Dec 28 '11 at 3:23
    
this is not really different than creating 5 threads with the Runnable. –  irreputable Dec 28 '11 at 3:28
1  
This is way overkill. You don't need the queue AND the ExecutorService. Because the ExecutorService is a fixed thread pool, you can just submit ALL of the tasks to it, and they'll run five at a time until they're all done. There's no need for the queue. –  David Wallace Dec 28 '11 at 4:05

The approach in Kylar's answer is the correct one. Use the executor classes provided by the Java class libraries rather than implementing thread pooling yourself from scratch (badly).


But I thought it might be useful to discuss the code in your question and why it doesn't work. (I've filled in some of the parts that you left out as best I can ...)

public class MyThread extends Thread {

    private static int counter;

    public MyThread(String fileName, Object lock) {
        // Save parameters in instance variables
    }

    public void run() {
        // Do stuff with instance variables
        counter--;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // ...
        for (final File filename : folder.listFiles()) {
            Object lock1 = new Object();
            new MyThread(filename, lock1).start();
            counter++;
            while (counter > 5);
        }
        // ...
    }
}

OK, so what is wrong with this? Why doesn't it work?

Well the first problem is that in main you are reading and writing counter without doing any synchronization. I assume that it is also being updated by the worker threads - the code makes no sense otherwise. So that means that there is a good chance that the main threads won't see the result of the updates made by the child threads. In other words, while (counter > 5); could be an infinite loop. (In fact, this is pretty likely. The JIT compiler is allowed to generate code in which the counter > 5 simply tests the value of counter left in a register after the previous counter++; statement.

The second problem is that your while (counter > 5); loop is incredibly wasteful of resources. You are telling the JVM to poll a variable ... and it will do this potentially BILLIONS of times a second ... running one processor (core) flat out. You shouldn't do that. If you are going to implement this kind of stuff using low-level primitives, you should use Java's Object.wait() and Object.notify() methods; e.g. the main thread waits, and each worker thread notifies.

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Whatever method you are using to create a new Thread, increment a global counter, add a conditional statement around the thread creation that if the limit has been reached then don't create a new thread, maybe push the files onto a queue (a list?) and then you could add another conditional statement, after a thread is created, if there are items in the queue, to process those items first.

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You can use an ExecutorService as a thread pool AND a queue.

ExecutorService pool = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(5);
File f = new File(args[0]);

for (final File kid : f.listFiles()) {
    pool.execute(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            process(kid);
        }
    });
}
pool.shutdown();
// wait for them to finish for up to one minute.
pool.awaitTermination(1, TimeUnit.MINUTES);
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