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int main() {
  boost::regex reg("(\\d+),?");
  std::string s="1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21";

  boost::sregex_iterator it(s.begin(),s.end(),reg);
  boost::sregex_iterator end;

  regex_callback c;
  int sum=for_each(it,end,c).sum();
}

As you can see, the past-the-end iterator passed to for_each is simply a default-constructed instance of regex_iterator.

Question> Since the end is NOT associated with any container, how does the std::for_each can use it as the ONE-PASS-END landmark of the container?

Thank you

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4 Answers 4

Well, the description of regex_iterator() is:

regex_iterator();
Effects: constructs an end of sequence regex_iterator.

This could happen as follows with a hypothetical pseudo-codey definition of next():

void boost::regex_iterator::next() {
    this->ptr++;
    if (this->ptr == this->original_defined_end_ptr) {
         this = regex_iterator();
    } else {
         ...
    }
}

Alternatively:

class regex_iterator:
    regex_iterator():
        this->only_true_when_compared_to_end_iterator = true

    regex_iterator(begin, end):
        this->only_true_when_compared_to_end_iterator = false
        this->cur = begin
        this->end = end

    operator==(other):
        if this->only_true_when_compared_to_end_iterator:
             return other->cur == other->end
        if other->only_true_when_compared_to_end_iterator:
             return this->cur == this->end
        return this->cur == other->cur

    next():
        this->cur++

Or perhaps:

class regex_iterator:
    regex_iterator():
        this->cur = 0

    regex_iterator(begin, end):
        this->cur = begin
        this->end = end

    operator==(other):
        return this->cur == other->cur

    next():
        this->cur = this->cur->next()
        if this->cur == this->end:
            this->cur = 0
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I still cannot figure out how we can design an end iterator that works for different containers. –  q0987 Dec 28 '11 at 4:06
    
Based on your example, how can we share the same original_defined_end_ptr among different containers each occupying different memory space. –  q0987 Dec 28 '11 at 4:14
    
I added a large block of pseudo code... –  sharth Dec 28 '11 at 4:14
3  
@q0987: You can't. But you can design a container that returns an end iterator that compares equal to all other end iterators. –  Ben Voigt Dec 28 '11 at 4:15

It is very simple. The iterator it increments in such a way that at one point it becomes equal to the end iterator. When does it become equal to end? when there is no more item that the iterator it can iterate through.

Since the class boost::sregex_iterator knows how default constructed iterator end gets created and what value it is having, so it can give same value to it, or some value which the implementation of operator!= uses to compare the iterators and infers if they are unequal or not. It means, it also depend on the definition of operator!= which compares the iterators.

As for an example, see this range_iterator to demonstrate the basic idea:

struct range_iterator
{
       int lower_, upper_;
       range_iterator() : upper_(0), lower_(0) 
       {}
       range_iterator(int lower, int upper) : upper_(upper), lower_(lower) 
       {}
       int operator*(){ return lower_; }
       int operator++(){ lower_++; }

       bool operator != (range_iterator const & other)
       {
           return (upper_-lower_) != (other.upper_-other.lower_);
       }
};

int main()
{
       range_iterator begin(10,25), end;
       while(begin != end)
       {
          std::cout << *begin << std::endl;;
          ++begin;
       }
}

Output:

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

Online demo : http://ideone.com/SOzXe

See the implementation of operator!= and the default constructor; how they together works, and how operator!= infers if the iterators are unequal or not. It is very simple implementation. I know that this class can be implemented in many different ways. But the basic idea of equality and inequality of iterators is same.

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The key point is that how do we share end iterator among different containers. –  q0987 Dec 28 '11 at 4:13
    
@q0987: Different containers means different type? No it cannot be shared among different type. –  Nawaz Dec 28 '11 at 4:14
    
I mean different instances of the same container type. Since different instances use different memory space, it is difficult for me to imagine how we can use a shared end across all different instances. –  q0987 Dec 28 '11 at 4:19
    
@q0987: See my edit. See especially the implementation of operator!= and the default constructor. –  Nawaz Dec 28 '11 at 4:28

An important thing to remark is that this is not a general behavior. In the standard, default constructed iterators act as “end” iterators for iostream iterators, but not for iterators into a container. Usually, this idiom is used for input iterators, or other cases where it is impossible to know the end of the sequence before actually reading it. The authors of boost::regex decided to follow this convention for boost::sregex_iterator; there was certainly no requirement for them to do so. But the fact that while it is a forward iterator, it is generally impossible to know where the end is until you try to advance to it, so the use seems sort of reasonable.

In the case of input iterators, the definition of “equals” is rather loose, and about all that is required is that iterators defined as “end” compare unequal to iterators which aren't defined as “end”; a simple myIsAtEnd flag as member, and

bool
IteratorType::operator==( IteratorType const& other ) const
{
    return myIsAtEnd != other.myIsAtEnd;
}

or

bool
IteratorType::operator==( IteratorType const& other ) const
{
    return myIsAtEnd && other.myIsAtEnd;
}

is probably sufficient. Since boost::sregex_iterator is a forward iterator, and not simply an input iterator, the constraints are somewhat more rigorous, but can easily be made to subsume the above, e.g. with something like the following:

bool
boost::sregex_iterator::operator==(
    boost::sregex_iterator const& other )
{
    return myIsAtEnd
        ?  other.myIsAtEnd
        :  (!other.myIsAtEnd
            && myMatchPosition == other.myMatchPosition);
}

The default constructor simply setts myIsAtEnd to true. (The other constructor you use will start by trying to find the first match, and will systematically set myIsAtEnd to whether it finds a match or not.)

It's probably worth pointing out that Boost often does this with iterators. The standard iterator concept is more or less broken (since it requires two objects, rather than one), and this is a more or less standard idiom for working around it. You'll find it widely used in boost::iterator as well, for things like filtering iterators.

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Question> Since the end is NOT associated with any container, how does the std::for_each can use it as the ONE-PASS-END landmark of the container?

An iterator doesn't have to be associated with any container at all. One example is stream iterators that reads input from some source, like the console (perhaps a keyboard).

Such an iterator might contain a pointer to the source of the next input. When reaching the end of input (somehow), this pointer can be set to NULL. If the default constructed iterator also contains a NULL pointer, it will look just like an end iterator.

std::for_each doesn't have to know anything about this. It just calls the overloaded operator!= for the iterator type. The operator will know if the two iterators compared are both end iterators or not.

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