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Suppose I have something like this:

for (int i = 0; i < 1001; i++)
{
    double step = i / 1000.0;

    // do some math here
}

Basically turning:

double step = i / 1000.0;

into this:

double step = i * 0.001;

I am not sure if this kind of change can be made without changing the result of the program, but was wondering if C# compiler or the jitter does something like this? If not, why? I assume either it's not worth it or they didn't add this optimization yet.

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4  
That first one needs to be i / 1000.0. Otherwise the division is done entirely in integers and the result is always zero or one. –  Eric Lippert Dec 28 '11 at 15:54
    
Since 1/1000 can't be represented exactly in IEEE-754: You're basically asking: "Will the JIT produce inexact results for fp math to be faster?". That's not that absurd since C++ compilers have included non strict math modes for a long time (no idea if even they would do such an optimization though), so who knows. You'd have to read the language spec to be sure, I think it unlikely though. –  Voo Dec 28 '11 at 16:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Let's break it down into several questions:

Can the jitter legally change d / 1000.0 into d * 0.001?

No, because those two computations give different results. Remember, floating point numbers are binary fractions, not decimal fractions; that 0.001 as a double is not exactly equal to 1 / 1000 any more than 0.333333333 as a double is exactly equal to 1 / 3. 0.001 is the closest fraction to 1/1000 that can be expressed in 52 binary bits. And therefore there are values such that x / 1000.0 does not equal x * 0.001.

Can the jitter legally change d / 2.0 into d * 0.5?

Yes. In that case the values can be represented exactly in binary because 1/2 has a small power of two on the bottom.

The jitter can also change integer divisions and multiplications like x / 2 or x * 2 into x >> 1 or x << 1.

Does the jitter actually do so when it is legal?

I don't know. Try it!

What you'll want to do is compile the program "retail" and then start it up not in the debugger and run it until you know the code in question has been jitted. Then attach the debugger and examine the jitted code. The jitter will generate worse code if it knows that a debugger is attached, because it is trying to generate code that is easier to debug.

I assume either it's not worth it or they didn't add this optimization yet.

For the division-to-multiplication case you are assuming that multiplication is faster than division. Modern chips are pretty darn good at both; though division typically does require more bit operations it might be the case that the difference is negligable.

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About the possible performance gains: According to Aigner's instruction tables for SB, MULPD is 1 cycle while DIVPD is 10-22 cycles (reciprocal throughput so assuming we can do enough divs/muls..) –  Voo Dec 28 '11 at 16:27
    
@Voo: Absolutely. But if the division is not the bottleneck in the first place then turning it into a multiplication isn't going to make a difference to the end user. –  Eric Lippert Dec 28 '11 at 16:37
    
Actually I wanted to emphasize your point: Saving not even 2 dozen cycles (best case!) per iteration in a 1000 iterations loop? Yawn, wake me up if something interesting happens (a single cache miss would be worse). Also the situations in which the JIT could do this optimization are minimal - I could think of lots of things the JIT guys should concentrate on before that. But then all depends on what you do: I assume HPC guys could have a different opinion on this. –  Voo Dec 28 '11 at 16:48
    
Thanks Eric, amazing reply. Btw since you said d/2.0 would be the same as d * 0.5, do you know if the same thing can be said for d/4.0 vs d * 0.25? –  Joan Venge Dec 28 '11 at 16:59
4  
@Joan Just check whether 0.25 can be represented in binary exactly (and obviously that it fits inside single/double IEEE-754 format) or not. In your case: Yes it can: .01 –  Voo Dec 28 '11 at 17:02

You could just try it, but I'm feeling generous today so I did it for you.

Test 1:

    static void Test1(int i)
    {
        double x = i / 1000.0;
        if (x == 0)
            throw new Exception();
    }

(the throw is there to ease attaching the debugger at exactly the right moment)

Disassembly (64 bit):

cvtsi2sd    xmm0,dword ptr [rsp+60h] 
divsd       xmm0,mmword ptr [000000C8h] 

Disassembly (32 bit):

fild        dword ptr [ebp-4] 
fdiv        dword ptr ds:[0460012Ch] 

Ok, test code 2: i / 2.0
Disassembly (64 bit):

cvtsi2sd    xmm0,dword ptr [rsp+60h] 
divsd       xmm0,mmword ptr [000000C8h] 

Disassembly (32 bit):

fild        dword ptr [ebp-4] 
fdiv        dword ptr ds:[0460012Ch] 

Conclusion: no, the JIT compiler does not make this optimization.
Does it matter? Not often. You can easily "fix" it by writing i * (1 / 1000.0) or some such (constant folding is mandatory in that case - do not remove the parentheses).

The JIT compiler does do this optimization on integers.

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I started with these two methods:

public static double Division(double i)
{
    return i / 1000.0;
}

public static double Multiplication(double i)
{
    return i * 0.001;
}

Compiled, then opened up the assembly in ILSpy. This is the resulting IL:

.method public hidebysig static 
    float64 Division (
        float64 i
    ) cil managed 
{
    // Method begins at RVA 0x2052
    // Code size 12 (0xc)
    .maxstack 8

    IL_0000: ldarg.0
    IL_0001: ldc.r8 1000
    IL_000a: div
    IL_000b: ret
} // end of method Program::Division

.method public hidebysig static 
    float64 Multiplication (
        float64 i
    ) cil managed 
{
    // Method begins at RVA 0x205f
    // Code size 12 (0xc)
    .maxstack 8

    IL_0000: ldarg.0
    IL_0001: ldc.r8 0.001
    IL_000a: mul
    IL_000b: ret
} // end of method Program::Multiplication

As you can see, it doesn't change the multiplication into a division or the division into a multiplication. I'm not clear on how one operation would be an optimized over the other, though.

Edit: Forgot about the jitter. Well, that's platform dependent. So its not really even possible to answer, I think, unless you're Eric Lippert.

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You built this in a Debug configuration. Just for the record, why don't you build it in a Release configuration and post those results? –  Adam Maras Dec 28 '11 at 5:36
    
I did. I realized I did a debug, then quickly edited my question. –  Amy Dec 28 '11 at 5:43
2  
Hey, I know nothing about the jitter. If I have a question like this, I look at what the jitter outputs, same as everyone else. –  Eric Lippert Dec 28 '11 at 15:51
    
More from a Java pov (but same applies at least to some degree to the CLR as well): The IL isn't there to optimize anything, that's clearly the jitter's job, so any time you ask yourself whether the IL is optimizing XYZ, just assume No and you'll be right in 98% of all cases. Now whether the JIT will optimize this stuff: Look at it. But: I seriously doubt it since we're dealing with fp math here which is notoriously fickle. Dividing by x or multiplying with 1/x will generally not result in the same output, so we'd first have to check whether 1/x can be represented exactly. –  Voo Dec 28 '11 at 15:54

Is this what you were asking? I was a little unsure..

for(double i = .001; i < 1.001; i+=.001){
    //TODO: Implement
}
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Thanks yeah that would work too. I was just curious if the compiler would be able to optimize these kinds of operations by itself. –  Joan Venge Dec 28 '11 at 5:47
    
You could take Inuyasha's approach, except instead of being methods have them overload the operator and make i its own class instead of double to be MyDouble and then overload the / operator to instead multiply everything by the reciprical of the denominator. –  Travis J Dec 28 '11 at 5:49
    
This is how you should optimize the code. You're removing an arithmetic operation entirely. My 'approach' was simply demonstrating that the compiler does not change the arithmetic in the code, even though it is practically equivalent. –  Amy Dec 28 '11 at 6:08
5  
Since 0.001 cannot be accurately represented as a decimal, this technique is fraught with peril. Small rounding errors can cause this sort of code to run one too many or one too few times, as rounding errors accumulate. You are better off doing the loop in integers which are exact, and computing the floating point number every time through the loop. –  Eric Lippert Dec 28 '11 at 15:53
1  
@EricLippert I think you meant to say "Since 0.001 cannot be accurately represented as a double" (rather than "...decimal"). –  phoog Dec 28 '11 at 17:50

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