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I'm trying to clone objects using RTTI in D2010. Here's my attempt so far:

uses SysUtils, TypInfo, rtti;
type
  TPerson = class(TObject)
  public
    Name: string;
    destructor Destroy(); Override;
  end;
destructor TPerson.Destroy;
begin
  WriteLn('A TPerson was freed.');
  inherited;
end;
procedure CloneInstance(SourceInstance: TObject; DestinationInstance: TObject; Context: TRttiContext); Overload;
var
  rSourceType:      TRttiType;
  rDestinationType: TRttiType;
  rField:           TRttiField;
  rSourceValue:     TValue;
  Destination:      TObject;
  rMethod:          TRttiMethod;
begin
  rSourceType := Context.GetType(SourceInstance.ClassInfo);
  if (DestinationInstance = nil) then begin
    rMethod := rSourceType.GetMethod('Create');
    DestinationInstance := rMethod.Invoke(rSourceType.AsInstance.MetaclassType, []).AsObject;
  end;
  for rField in rSourceType.GetFields do begin
    if (rField.FieldType.TypeKind = tkClass) then begin
      // TODO: Recursive clone
    end else begin
      // Non-class values are copied (NOTE: will cause problems with records etc.)
      rField.SetValue(DestinationInstance, rField.GetValue(SourceInstance));
    end;
  end;
end;
procedure CloneInstance(SourceInstance: TObject; DestinationInstance: TObject); Overload;
var
  rContext:       TRttiContext;
begin
  rContext := TRttiContext.Create();
  CloneInstance(SourceInstance, DestinationInstance, rContext);
  rContext.Free();
end;
var
  Original:     TPerson;
  Clone:        TPerson;
begin
  ReportMemoryLeaksOnShutdown := true;
  Original := TPerson.Create();
  CloneInstance(Original, Clone);
  Clone.Free();
  Original.Free();
  ReadLn;
end.

A little disappointingly, I don't see more than one occurrence of "A TPerson was freed.' to the output (which is confirmed by stepping through the program) - only the original is destroyed using the overridden destructor.

Can anyone please help me having the overridden destructor called? (And perhaps explain why it isn't called in the first place.) Thanks!

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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Couple of problems with your code.

You do not initialize the Clone variable to nil. Which on my machine led to access violations in the upper CloneInstance method, as no clone was created because the passed in value was non-nil.

You do not have the DestinationInstance parameter declared as var. This means that the instantiation in the upper CloneInstance method doesn't get back to the caller. Adding var to the parameter solves the problem. You do need to use TObject(Clone) in the call to CloneInstance from the main method of the program, or Delphi will complain about 'there is no overloaded method that can be called with these parameters'. This is because var parameters want their exact declared type passed into them.

I changed your code to:

uses
  SysUtils,
  TypInfo,
  rtti;

type
  TPerson = class(TObject)
  public
    Name: string;
    constructor Create;
    destructor Destroy(); Override;
  end;

constructor TPerson.Create;
begin
  WriteLn('A TPerson was created');
end;

destructor TPerson.Destroy;
begin
  WriteLn('A TPerson was freed.');
  inherited;
end;

procedure CloneInstance(SourceInstance: TObject; var DestinationInstance: TObject; Context: TRttiContext); Overload;
var
  rSourceType:      TRttiType;
  rDestinationType: TRttiType;
  rField:           TRttiField;
  rSourceValue:     TValue;
  Destination:      TObject;
  rMethod:          TRttiMethod;
begin
  rSourceType := Context.GetType(SourceInstance.ClassInfo);
  if (DestinationInstance = nil) then begin
    rMethod := rSourceType.GetMethod('Create');
    DestinationInstance := rMethod.Invoke(rSourceType.AsInstance.MetaclassType, []).AsObject;
  end;
  for rField in rSourceType.GetFields do begin
    if (rField.FieldType.TypeKind = tkClass) then begin
      // TODO: Recursive clone
    end else begin
      // Non-class values are copied (NOTE: will cause problems with records etc.)
      rField.SetValue(DestinationInstance, rField.GetValue(SourceInstance));
    end;
  end;
end;

procedure CloneInstance(SourceInstance: TObject; var DestinationInstance: TObject); Overload;
var
  rContext:       TRttiContext;
begin
  rContext := TRttiContext.Create();
  CloneInstance(SourceInstance, DestinationInstance, rContext);
  rContext.Free();
end;

var
  Original:     TPerson;
  Clone:        TPerson;
begin
  Clone := nil;
  ReportMemoryLeaksOnShutdown := true;
  Original := TPerson.Create();
  Original.Name := 'Marjan';

  CloneInstance(Original, TObject(Clone));
  Original.Name := 'Original';
  WriteLn('Original name: ', Original.Name);
  WriteLn('Clone name: ', Clone.Name);

  Clone.Free();
  Original.Free();
  ReadLn;
end.

I added a constructor to see both instances being created as well and a couple of lines to check the names after the cloning. The output reads:

A TPerson was created
A TPerson was created
Original name: Original
Clone name: Marjan
A TPerson was freed.
A TPerson was freed.
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thank you very much! It works like a charm. And to quote Homer Simpson: D'oh! (It's not my first, but hopefully last, time being bitten by a missing 'var'). –  conciliator Dec 29 '11 at 7:21
    
Oh, on a side note: I'm not getting an AV even though Clone is not explicitly set to nil. –  conciliator Dec 29 '11 at 7:22
    
@conciliator: well, not setting it explicitely means you have no idea what its value is, it could be nil, it could be anything. And that means that your code can behave unpredictably because it will be dependent on what value just happened to be at Clone's address before. And, AV's don't always happen immediately. If you only call methods that do not use any fields of a class, you could be fine for ages! Then when it does bite you in the behind, you will have an awful time trying to figure out where it comes from. TLDR: ALWAYS initialize your variables. –  Marjan Venema Dec 29 '11 at 8:04
    
You are absolutely right, one should make a habit of initializing all variables. Thanks again. –  conciliator Dec 30 '11 at 7:18
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An example solution (for constructor, but basically also usable in this case) is at

How can I create an Delphi object from a class reference and ensure constructor execution? in this answer

However it needs to know the destination type ... which might not be an option

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OP seems to be doing exactly the same thing as in the linked answer (variant 2), albeit in two statements instead of one. And would you really have to call Destroy in the same manner as Create in the linked answer? I certainly hope not. Once a class is instantiated correctly, calling any method on an object reference of that instance should follow the normal rules. (And the cast is used after instantiation, though you are right that Destroy (ugh) is called on a variable of the correct type). –  Marjan Venema Dec 28 '11 at 11:45
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