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I have an weighted graph for protein nodes. I was writing a Perl program to find the shortest path for a given node using Dijkstra's Algorithm. Each protein (vertex) has equal weight. My program doesn't stop iterating and doesn't give me any output. I don't know what is causing the problem.

My idea is to get the name of a protein node from the user and start searching the shortest path by using the given protein as a root node.

%graph = (
  'A' => {'B' => 1, 'C' => 5},
  'B' => {'C' => 4, 'D' => 2},
  'C' => {'A' => 1, 'B' => 3},
  'D' => {'C' => 2, 'B' => 3}
);

sub dijkstra {
    print "Enter a node\n";
    my $root= <>;
    my $infinity = "inf";
    my %graph= %graph;
    my %dist;
    my %prev;
    ############################ the algorithm ####
    # first, set all distances to infinity
    foreach $n (keys %graph) { $dist{$n} = $infinity; $prev{$n}=$n; }
    # .. except the source
    $dist{$root} = 0;
    # loop while we have unsolved nodes
    # sort unsolved by distance from root
    foreach my $n1 (sort keys %graph) {
        foreach my $n2 (keys %{$graph{$n1}}) {
            if (($dist{$n2} eq $infinity) ||
                ($dist{$n2} > ($dist{$n1} + $graph{$n1}{$n2}) )) {
                $dist{$n2} = $dist{$n} + $graph{$n1}{$n2};
                $prev{$n2} = $n1;
            }
        }
    }
    ##### print the solutions ######
    my $path;
    foreach $n(keys %graph) {
        my $t = $n;
        $path = $t;
        while ($t ne $root) { $t = $prev{$t}; $path = "$t -> " . $path; }
        print "$n\t$dist{$n}\t$path\n";
    }
}
dijkstra();
share|improve this question
    
The code sample is incomplete without sample data (the value of the global %graph). –  outis Dec 28 '11 at 10:22

1 Answer 1

When you read input using <>, it includes the trailing newline character. As a result, it isn't equal to any of the keys in %graph (which presumably don't have newline characters). The quick fix is to chomp the root.

...
my $root = <>;
chomp $root;

The complete fix is to check that $root is a valid vertex and output an error if not. Note that you shouldn't handle user input and application logic in the same function. Separate concerns to reduce coupling.

Also, globals are bad. Package variables aren't so bad if that's what you're doing, but %group should be passed to dijkstra (as a reference) so the implementation isn't that closely tied to the graph. Passing the graph as a parameter tightens up the code.

Note that you don't need to define your own infinity. Perl has inf (and -inf).

sub dijkstra {
    my ($graph, $root) = @_;
    my (%dist, %prev);

    ############################ the algorithm ####
    # first, set all distances to infinity
    foreach $n (keys %{$graph}) { $dist{$n} = inf; $prev{$n}=$n; }
    # .. except the source
    $dist{$root} = 0;

    # loop while we have unsolved nodes
    # sort unsolved by distance from root
    foreach my $n1 (sort keys %{$graph}) {
        foreach my $n2 (keys %{$graph->{$n1}}) {
            if (($dist{$n2} eq inf) ||
                ($dist{$n2} > ($dist{$n1} + $graph->{$n1}{$n2}) )) {
                $dist{$n2} = $dist{$n} + $graph->{$n1}{$n2};
                $prev{$n2} = $n1;
            }
        }
    }
    return (\%prev, \%dist);
}

sub getNode {
    my $graph = shift;
    print "Enter a node\n";
    my $root= <>;
    chomp $root;
    if (! exists $graph->{$root}) {
        die("'$root' isn't a valid node.\n");
    }
    return $root;
}

sub printPaths {
    my ($graph, $prev, $dist) = @_;
    my $path;

    foreach $n (keys %{$graph}) {
        my $t = $n;
        $path = $t;
        while ($t ne $root) {
            $t = $prev->{$t}; $path = "$t -> " . $path;
        }
        print "$n\t$dist->{$n}\t$path\n";
    }
}

$graph = {
  'A' => {'B' => 1, 'C' => 5},
  'B' => {'C' => 4, 'D' => 2},
  'C' => {'A' => 1, 'B' => 3},
  'D' => {'C' => 2, 'B' => 3}
};
$root = getNode($graph);
#($prev, $dist) = dijkstra(\%graph, $root);
#printPaths($graph, $prev, $dist);
# or, for obfuscation:
printPaths($graph, dijkstra($graph, $root));

To debug something like this, you can use scaffolding (print debugging messages at various points in the code; Data::Dumper is useful for this). Better yet, learn to use an interactive debugger.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks dude, but i still have a problem when i try to reference my graph, normally what i've done is, I just reference my graph that i've already implemented it by reading from the file and put it in a hash. –  Michael.Z Dec 28 '11 at 19:42
    
@Michael.Z: SO is a Q&A site, not a forum. If you have a different question, post it as such once you've searched to make sure it's not a duplicate. You can link back to this question (or answer) in your new question, should you wish to provide context. Make sure any code samples in your new question are minimized: complete and concise. –  outis Dec 28 '11 at 20:32
    
... If this answer resolves the question you asked (and I assure you, it does), please accept it in a few days. It's not a technical requirement, but it is a social one. For one thing, it lets everyone know that more answers aren't needed. It also rewards the answerer (and you) with reputation. When you get an answer that resolves your issue, it's generally best to wait two days before accepting in case a better one comes in. Don't worry about accepting answers for unresolved questions. –  outis Dec 28 '11 at 20:35
    
Read the FAQs, if you haven't already, to familiarize yourself with how SO works. It's not what you think. –  outis Dec 28 '11 at 20:38
    
thanks for the information. –  Michael.Z Dec 29 '11 at 4:05

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