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In the book "The Craft of Function Programming" the symbol '>.>' joins functions together, opposite the direction of '.'. But when I implemented it using ghci, it shows the error '>.>' out of scope. Why? Is it an old notation that is not used anymore?

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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It's probably just a function defined by the book (I didn't read the book). AFAIK, >.> is not used anywhere. You could define it yourself:

(>.>) = flip (.)

The de-facto notation of this seems to be (#).

Since functions are arrows "Control.Category" you could also use >>>, e.g.

Prelude Control.Category> ((*2) . (+1)) 4
10
Prelude Control.Category> ((*2) <<< (+1)) 4
10
Prelude Control.Category> ((*2) >>> (+1)) 4
9
Prelude Control.Category> ((+1) >>> (*2)) 4
10
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Thank you for this simple clear answer. But I just don't get it, how come in the book it has this notation, it doesn't define it in the book, it uses it like a standard notation. The >.> is even in the index of the book and on graphs of all the different Haskell operators....... –  HHC Dec 28 '11 at 12:42
2  
@HHC: I don't know. You need to ask the author... –  KennyTM Dec 28 '11 at 13:54
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>.> is not defined by default, but you could define it yourself:

infixl 9  >.>
(>.>) = flip (.)

or equivalently,

infixl 9  >.>
f >.> g = g . f

(I gave the fixity declaration based on the infixr 9 . in the Prelude.)

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Also directly: (f >.> g) x = g (f x) or (>.>) f g x = g (f x) –  Dan Burton Dec 28 '11 at 20:40
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(>.>) doesn't appear to be defined in the standard libraries. However, there is (>>>) in Control.Category, which behaves the same:

Prelude> :m + Control.Category
Prelude Control.Category> :i (>>>)
(>>>) :: Category cat => cat a b -> cat b c -> cat a c
    -- Defined in Control.Category
infixr 1 >>>
Prelude Control.Category> let f = (* 2) >>> (+ 3)
Prelude Control.Category> f 5
13

Note that you can use Hoogle to figure these things out.

Furthermore, you can of course, always define such an operator yourself:

(>.>) :: (a -> b) -> (b -> c) -> (a -> c)
f >.> g = g . f

Then you can write:

Main*> ((* 2) >.> (+ 3)) 5
13
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