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I'm using FluentValidation framework. And at the moment I have several validators (per entity). I'm keeping entities in a separate assembly (ProjectName.Domain) and validators either.

I've read about a service layer that presents mediator layer between repositories and controllers (http://www.asp.net/mvc/tutorials/older-versions/models-(data)/validating-with-a-service-layer-cs). Is it OK to hold service layer in the same assembly?

As far as I understand the purpose of service layer is to hold concrete (or possibly generic) repository and corresponding validator and make a validation over repository items. So implementations may vary. Am I right?

How to make service layer using FluentValidation (or framework independent) the right way. Or would it be acceptable to integrate base entity with some FluentValidation AbstractValidator class.

Thanks!

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

separating layers doesn't require physically separate assemblies. in fact the more assemblies you have, the more difficult/cumbersome it is to manage a solution. separating layers is a logical concern. maybe it's separated by namespace, or a naming convention.

As far as I understand the purpose of service layer is to hold concrete (or possibly generic) repository and corresponding validator and make a validation over repository items. So implementations may vary. Am I right?

that can be one use for a service layer, but it doesn't have to be. The term "services" has has become overused in the last few years to the point that it almost means nothing.

the purpose of layering your application is to allow the application to adapt to change. that's a very vague statement, but that's all it's designed to do. layers allow encapsulation and encapsulation allows for change.

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