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Basically, I have an array being passed as a pointer to a function, which capitalizes the first letter, the strlen of that array is also being passed.

What I want to do, after capitalization, is to then append '1' to the end of the array, so that hello becomes Hello1. But I am unsure how to do such thing in code, or whether its possible.

...
char myString[70];  <-- Array being passed, where the string is never > 64 char's.
...

void capFirst(char *s, int i) {
    s[0] = (toupper(s[0]));
}

EDIT: Solutions below do the following:

1Security
1Sebastian
1Schumacher
1Sanderson

EDIT:

void capFirst(char *s, int i) {
 s[0] = toupper(s[0]);
 s[i] = 1;
 s[i+1] = '\0';
}


int main(int argc, char** argv) {
int i;
int j = 0;
char fileSave[256];
char myString[50];
FILE *fpIn, *fpOut;
for(i = 1; i < argc; i++) {
    fpIn = fopen(argv[i], "rb");
    snprintf(fileSave, 256, "%s~[%d]", argv[i], i);
    fpOut= fopen(fileSave, "wb");
    while((fgets(myString, 49, fpIn)) != NULL) {
        if(isspace(myString[0]))
            break;
        j = strlen(myString);
        if( (j > 8) && (j < 64) ) {
            capFirst(myString, strlen(myString));
            fprintf(fpOut, "%s", myString);
        }
    }

}
return 0;
}

UPDATE:

void capFirstappOne(char *s, int i) {
    s[0] = toupper(s[0]);
    s[i] = '1';
    s[i+1] = '\0';
}


int main(int argc, char** argv) {
int i; int j = 0;
char fileSave[256];
char myString[50];
FILE *fpIn, *fpOut;
for(i = 1; i < argc; i++) {
    fpIn = fopen(argv[i], "rb");
    snprintf(fileSave, 256, "%s~[%d]", argv[i], i);
    fpOut= fopen(fileSave, "wb");
    while((fgets(myString, 64, fpIn)) != NULL) {
        j = strlen(myString);
        if (j > 0 && (myString[j-1] == '\n')) {
            myString[j-1] = '\0';
        }
        if( j > 8) {
            capFirstappOne(myString, strlen(myString));
            fprintf(fpOut, "%s\n", myString);
        }
    }

}
return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
you are passing the wrong 'i', i.e i will be 0 when you sent. You gotta call the function as capFirst(myString, strlen(myString)); – Chethan Ravindranath Dec 28 '11 at 13:37
    
It still adds it to the beginning :/ – PnP Dec 28 '11 at 13:45
    
@user1048116 Post the code how you call the function. If you call it with capFirst(myString,strlen(myString)), where capFirst is modified as in Chethan Ravindranath's answer, the only possibilities that the '1' is put at the front are 1. a completely broken toolchain, 2. you don't use strlen as provided by the implementation. – Daniel Fischer Dec 28 '11 at 13:56
    
EDIT: code above – PnP Dec 28 '11 at 14:02
1  
Ah, it puts the '1' right at the end, but the fgets leaves the newline in the string, so you get e.g. "Sebastian\n1" and the '1' appears on the next line, right before the next name. – Daniel Fischer Dec 28 '11 at 14:17

Try this (if the array is large enough):

s[i] = '1';
s[i + 1] = 0;
share|improve this answer
    
It adds it to the beginning :/ – PnP Dec 28 '11 at 13:57
    
@user1048116 You're passing the wrong length. – cnicutar Dec 28 '11 at 13:58

You must be sure that the array have enough space to take an extra 1 towards the end. And do not miss to terminate the string with '\0'.

void capFirst(char *s, int i) {
    s[0] = toupper(s[0]);
    s[i] = '1';
    s[i+1] = '\0';
}

Or use strcat() function.

void capFirst(char *s, int i) {
    s[0] = toupper(s[0]);
    strcat(s, "1");
}

The full program is as follows:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

void capFirst1(char *s, int i)  
{
    s[0] = toupper(s[0]);
    strcat(s, "1");
}

void capFirst2(char *s, int i)  
{
    s[0] = toupper(s[0]);
    s[i] = '1';
    s[i+1] = '\0';
}

int main(void)
{
    char a[10] = {"hello"};
    char b[10] = {"world"};

    capFirst1(a, strlen(a));
    printf("a = %s\n", a); 

    capFirst2(b, strlen(b));
    printf("b = %s\n", b); 

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
dont forget '' around the 1. – Daniel Persson Dec 28 '11 at 13:24
    
That places it at the beginning of the array :/ – PnP Dec 28 '11 at 13:28
    
1Security 1Sebastian 1Schumacher 1Sanderson – PnP Dec 28 '11 at 13:28
    
@DanielPersson " or ' ? :) – Sangeeth Saravanaraj Dec 28 '11 at 14:40
1  
@DanielPersson Its a funny thing. I was thinking you were asking me to add " (read double quotes) around the i and was as wondering why?! .. Now figured out that you meant " (read two single quotes)!! .. Thanks for your clarification. I've updated the code accordingly! – Sangeeth Saravanaraj Dec 29 '11 at 7:53

The function appears to put the '1' at the front of the string because the string originally ends with a newline. So when appending a '1' to that, the result looks like "Sebastian\n1". When these strings are printed to the output file - without any separators - the result looks like

Sebastian
1Schumacher
1Sanderson
1

When reading a file with fgets, check whether a newline has been read, and if the newline is not supposed to be part of the string in further processing, remove it (overwrite it with '\0'). When writing to a file with fprintf, it prints out only the characters it is passed, it doesn't add any separators, be it spaces or newlines, so one has to add the desired separators oneself.

In your code,

while((fgets(myString, 49, fpIn)) != NULL) {
    if(isspace(myString[0]))
        break;
    j = strlen(myString);
    if( (j > 8) && (j < 64) ) {
        capFirst(myString, strlen(myString));
        fprintf(fpOut, "%s", myString);
    }
}

to remove unwanted newlines, you could, after j = strlen(myString);, insert

    if (j > 0 && myString[j-1] == '\n') {
        myString[--j] = 0;
    }

Then a newline would be overwritten (fgets doesn't read more than one newline) and the variable holding the length decremented accordingly. You needn't recompute strlen then, you can call capFirst with

    if (j > 8) {
        capFirst(myString,j);
        fprintf(fpOut, "%s\n", myString);
    }

In the condition, you need not check j < 64 because you told fgets to not read more than 48 characters (49-1, one for the 0-terminator), so that is a given. In the snippet above, I've added a newline to the format string, so each string is printed on its own line. If you don't want that, you could use "%s " to separate the strings with spaces, "%s," for commas etc.

share|improve this answer
    
Any chance of a clue on how to do this? I can't work it out exactly where I need to check, and what you mean by add the desired seperators. – PnP Dec 28 '11 at 16:17
1  
Yes, see edit for a simple recipe. – Daniel Fischer Dec 28 '11 at 16:33
    
After adding your suggestions, it still fails to work :( Thoroughly confused as the above made sense to me. – PnP Dec 28 '11 at 17:01
    
and it continues not to append the 1 – PnP Dec 28 '11 at 17:16
    
Update with your exact code, please. – Daniel Fischer Dec 28 '11 at 17:25

Here is how you can do it

char myString[70];
.....
void capFirst(char *s, int i) {
    s[0] = (toupper(s[0]));
    s[i] = '1';
    s[i+1] = 0;//NULL Termination
}
share|improve this answer
    
It adds it to the beginning :/ – PnP Dec 28 '11 at 13:57

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