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I have an array with an array in it. It looks like:

@test =(
  'mobilephone' => ['sony', 'htc'],
  'pc' => ['dell', 'apple']
);

How can I print out the inner array? I have 'mobilephone' and if the check variable is == 'mobilephone', so I want to print out sony and htc. How? Or is there another mistake by me?

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1  
Maybe a hash is better for this? tizag.com/perlT/perlhashes.php –  itdoesntwork Dec 28 '11 at 15:38
    
Please don't link to the tiztag Perl tutorial. It's rather old and nasty code. Instead, try learn.perl.org or Gabor's fast-growing tutorial at szabgab.com/perl_tutorial.html. –  Dave Cross Dec 29 '11 at 8:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

@test is wrong. You are declaring a hash.

Always use use strict; use warnings; at the beginning of your script. You will be able to detect many errors!

$test{key} will give you the corresponding array reference:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my %test =(
  mobilephone => ['sony', 'htc'],
  pc => ['dell', 'apple']
);

my $array = $test{mobilephone};

for my $brand (@{$array}) {
    print "$brand\n";
}

# or

for my $brand ( @{  $test{mobilephone} } ) {
    print "$brand\n";
}
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1  
warnings isn't going to catch this error. The OP made a perfectly valid assignment to an array. –  mob Dec 28 '11 at 17:49
1  
@mob I know but he would have got a warning while trying to use it as a hash. He just posted the definition not the attempts to use it. –  Matteo Dec 28 '11 at 19:40

You probably want a hash (designated by the % sigil, which is Perl's name for an associative array (a collection with strings as keys)). If so, one of the other 4 answers will help you. If you actually wanted an array for some reason (if your data can have multiple keys with the same name, or if you need to preserve the order of the data), you could use one of the following methods:

my @test = (
    mobilephone  => [qw(sony htc)],
    pc'          => [qw(dell apple)]
);

with a for loop:

for (0 .. $#test/2) {
    if ($test[$_*2] eq 'mobilephone') {
        print "$test[$_*2]: @{$test[$_*2+1]}\n"
    }
}

using a module:

use List::Gen 'every';
for (every 2 => @test) {
    if ($$_[0] eq 'mobilephone') {
        print "$$_[0]: @{$$_[1]}\n"
    }
}

another way:

use List::Gen 'mapn';
mapn {
    print "$_: @{$_[1]}\n" if $_ eq 'mobilephone'
} 2 => @test;

with methods:

use List::Gen 'by';
(by 2 => @test)
    ->grep(sub {$$_[0] eq 'mobilephone'})
    ->map(sub {"$$_[0]: @{$$_[1]}"})
    ->say;

Each block prints mobilephone: sony htc

Disclaimer: I wrote List::Gen.

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Notice I have changed your test to a hash

my %test =(
  'mobilephone' => ['sony', 'htc'],
  'pc' => ['dell', 'apple']
);

#Get the array reference corresponding to a hash key
my $pcarray = $test{mobilephone}; 

#loop through  all array elements
foreach my $k (@$pcarray)
{
    print $k , "\n";
}

should do it.

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That's not an array, it's a hash:

%test =(
  'mobilephone' => ['sony', 'htc'],
  'pc' => ['dell', 'apple']
);

my $inner = $test{'mobilephone'}; # get reference to array
print @$inner;                    # print dereferenced array ref

Or

print @{$test{'mobilephone'}};    # dereference array ref and print right away
share|improve this answer

That looks more like a hash assignment than an array assignment.

%test =(
    'mobilephone' => ['sony', 'htc'],
    'pc' => ['dell', 'apple']
);

In this case, you'd try:

print Dumper( $test{mobilephone} );
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