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I am trying to delete a file after i create it but simply cannot. The error message is that it is still being used by the process. I am working on a winform application.

here is my code:

XmlDocument xmlDoc = new XmlDocument();
XmlDeclaration xmlDec = xmlDoc.CreateXmlDeclaration("1.0", "utf-8", null);
xmlDoc.AppendChild(xmlDec);

XmlElement elmRoot = xmlDoc.CreateElement("testConfig");
xmlDoc.AppendChild(elmRoot);

GetConfigTags(xmlDoc, elmRoot, clientToken);

StreamWriter wText = 
    new StreamWriter(CommonCodeClass.configLocation + "EmailConfig.xml");
xmlDoc.Save(wText);
wText.Flush();
wText.Close();
wText.Dispose();
File.Delete(CommonCodeClass.configLocation + "EmailConfig.xml");

I have also tried the code below but the same error, File being used by another process

try
{
    File.Delete(CommonCodeClass.configLocation + "EmailConfig.xml");
}
catch  //or maybe in finally
{
    GC.Collect(); //kill object that keep the file. I think dispose will do the trick as well.
    Thread.Sleep(500); //Wait for object to be killed. 
    File.Delete(CommonCodeClass.configLocation + "EmailConfig.xml"); //File can be now deleted
    log.Error(CommonCodeClass.configLocation + "EmailConfig.xml" + " was deleted forcefully as it was being used by the process.");

}

Am i missing a close of file anywhere?

Please help. Thanks.

here is the code for getconfigtag: it just creates a tags to be applied in the config file.

 internal static void GetConfigTags(XmlDocument xmlDoc, XmlElement elmRoot, string clientToken)
    {
        // Username Element            
        XmlElement elmUsername = xmlDoc.CreateElement(CommonCodeClass.xml_Username);
        XmlAttribute xaUsername = xmlDoc.CreateAttribute("val");
        xaUsername.Value = "singleVal";
        elmUsername.InnerXml = "";
        elmUsername.Attributes.Append(xaUsername);
        elmRoot.AppendChild(elmUsername);
     }

StackTrace:

at System.IO.__Error.WinIOError(Int32 errorCode, String maybeFullPath) at System.IO.File.Delete(String path) at ShareMgmt.CommonCodeClass.EmailTheConfigFile(String userEmail, String clientToken) in C:\Users\ddsds\Documents\Visual Studio 2008\Projects\ShareMgmt\Mgmt\CommonCodeClass.cs:line 756 at ShareMgmt.UsersForm.btnConfigToAdmin_Click(Object sender, EventArgs e) in C:\Users\ddsds\Documents\Visual Studio 2008\Projects\ShareMgmt\Mgmt\UsersForm.cs:line 1122

share|improve this question
2  
What does the GetConfigTags method do? Also you should get in the habit of coding with using blocks. That way you don't have to worry about coding a Dispose call. –  Josh Dec 28 '11 at 15:48
    
Are you sure the error is coming from the File.Delete line? Could it be coming from the "new StreamWriter(...)" line? –  Bryan Dec 28 '11 at 15:48
    
The code seems to work for me. Please include a stack trace. Also, the GC collect will not remove a file lock. –  vcsjones Dec 28 '11 at 15:48
2  
As a general rule, wrap your IDisposable objects (wText) in a using statement. Then the calls to Flush(), Close() and Dispose() can all go away. –  Jesse C. Slicer Dec 28 '11 at 15:53
1  
Judging by your stack trace, it appears that you're trying to email the XML file. Are you using MailMessage.Attachments.Add(...)? I wonder if that's holding on to the reference. –  Bryan Dec 28 '11 at 16:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

"Am I missing a close of file anywhere?" You can be sure the file gets closed by using a 'using' statement.

    XmlDocument xmlDoc = new XmlDocument();
    XmlDeclaration xmlDec = xmlDoc.CreateXmlDeclaration("1.0", "utf-8", null);
    xmlDoc.AppendChild(xmlDec);

    XmlElement elmRoot = xmlDoc.CreateElement("testConfig");
    xmlDoc.AppendChild(elmRoot);

    GetConfigTags(xmlDoc, elmRoot, clientToken);

    using (StreamWriter wText = new StreamWriter(CommonCodeClass.configLocation + "EmailConfig.xml"))
    {
            xmlDoc.Save(wText);
            wText.Flush();
    }

    File.Delete(CommonCodeClass.configLocation + "EmailConfig.xml");

This code works for me, but so does a variation of your original, so beyond that, I'm not quite sure what the issue is.

Addendum:

It appears—by your stack trace—that you're trying to email an XML file. If that's the case, and you're using SmtpClient, you don't even need to write the XML document to a file.

MemoryStream memoryStream = new MemoryStream();
xmlDoc.Save(memoryStream);

// ...

mailMessage.Attachments.Add(
    new Attachment(memoryStream, "EmailConfig.xml", "application/xml"));
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks man.. U saved me a lot of time. –  user175084 Dec 28 '11 at 16:43

The code works for me, but I recommend the using statement every time you use an instance of a class that implements IDisposable.

Another thing: never call GC.Collect() to try forcing the GC to do the clean-up for you. If you dispose correctly your instances (with the using keyword you won't forget to) then the GC doesn't need you to tell him what to do.

share|improve this answer

xmlDoc still has a handle on the file.

Put the code that creates the file in a function so that xmlDoc goes out of scope when you go to delete. You might have to call GC.Collect(). To be sure this is one of the biggest problems I've encountered as well.

Or you may be able to put {} around the code without putting it in a function. You can always use {} to make different scopes.

So your above code becomes:

// other preceeding code    
{
    XmlDocument xmlDoc = new XmlDocument();
    XmlDeclaration xmlDec = xmlDoc.CreateXmlDeclaration("1.0", "utf-8", null);
    xmlDoc.AppendChild(xmlDec);

    XmlElement elmRoot = xmlDoc.CreateElement("testConfig");
    xmlDoc.AppendChild(elmRoot);

    GetConfigTags(xmlDoc, elmRoot, clientToken);

    StreamWriter wText = 
        new StreamWriter(CommonCodeClass.configLocation + "EmailConfig.xml");
    xmlDoc.Save(wText);
    wText.Flush();
    wText.Close();
    wText.Dispose();
}

File.Delete(CommonCodeClass.configLocation + "EmailConfig.xml");
share|improve this answer
2  
Don't rely on the scope of a variable to tell if an instance is GCed or not. We can't tell when the GC does the job. –  ken2k Dec 28 '11 at 16:09
    
Like I mentioned - this whole file lock situation is a problem, but the scope should remove the lock from the app point of view. –  Chuck Savage Dec 28 '11 at 16:43
2  
Nope. Exiting the scope actually does nothing. The GC won't do the job right after the end of scope is reached. –  ken2k Dec 28 '11 at 16:49

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