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I have different fruit class, all implements the same interface IFruit :

public interface IApple : IFruit{ }  
public interface IBanana : IFruit{ }  
public interface ICarrot: IFruit{ }  

Each of them have their own drawer :

public class AppleDrawer
{
    public void Draw(IApple apple, Graphics graphics){}
}

public class BananaDrawer
{
    public void Draw(IBanana banana, Graphics graphics){}
}

If I want to draw a list of fruit, I am doing the following

public void DrawFruits(List<IFruit> fruits, Graphics graphics)
{
    foreach(var fruit in fruits)
    {
        if(fruit is IBanana)
        {
            var banana = (IBanana)fruit;
            var drawer = new BananaDrawer();
            drawer.Draw(banana, graphics);
        }
        else if(fruit is IApple)
        {
            var apple = (IApple)fruit;
            var drawer = new AppleDrawer();
            drawer.Draw(banana, graphics);
        }
        etc...

}

I feel extremely dirty when I read my code.
My problem is the multiple if..else statement, because I have 12 differents fruits, and I have to do this statement a lot in my current project.

Is there a way to refactoring my DrawFruits method ?
I am thinking of a kind of factory pattern but I don't really see how to do it.
Is my fruit class must take a Drawer as a Property ? Or maybe I can call a Drawer Factory method ?

This is a pattern that I find a lot in my current project, and I don't find a solution that satisfies me.

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2  
Why not just use an IFruitDrawer? –  Cody Gray Dec 28 '11 at 15:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

One way is to have a GetDrawer on your IFruit

public interface IFruit 
{
    BaseDrawer GetDrawer();
}

and a BaseDrawer interface

public interface BaseDrawer
{
    void Draw(IFruit fruit, Graphics graphics);
}.

public class AppleDrawer : BaseDrawer
{
    public void Draw(IFruit apple, Graphics graphics) { }
}

public class BananaDrawer : BaseDrawer
{
    public void Draw(IFruit banana, Graphics graphics) { }
}

Now your draw Fruits is simply

   public void DrawFruits(List<IFruit> fruits, Graphics graphics)
    {
        foreach (var fruit in fruits)
        {
            var drawer = fruit.GetDrawer();
            drawer.Draw(fruit, graphics);
        }
    }

Sometimes you need a Drawer , Plotter and Printer so your IFruit might get too heavy like below

public interface IFruit 
{
    BaseDrawer GetDrawer();
    BasePrinter GetPrinter();
    BasePlotter GetPlotter();
}

Visitor pattern is a good solution for this. Basically you will have

 public interface iFruit
   {
      void Accept(FruitVisitor visitor);
   } 

only one class for all possible drawing visits

public class DrawVisitor : FruitVisitor 
   {
      public override void Visit(Apple apple)
      {
         //draw the apple
      }

      public override void Visit(Banana banana)
      { 
         // draw the banana
      }
   }

Here you just have one DrawVisitor instead of AppleDrawer , BananaDrawer etc and all your draw code is neatly in one place. You might end up needing PlotterVisitor , PrinterVisiter etc

share|improve this answer
    
Instead of having GetDrawer, you can have a Draw method. –  Saeed Amiri Dec 28 '11 at 15:58
1  
@SaeedAmiri Yes... put if the OP has separated the Draw code from IFruit I am assuming he doesn't want the implementation of the draw code in Apple , Banana etc etc concrete class but in a surrogate class –  parapura rajkumar Dec 28 '11 at 16:00
    
In all you used Drawer in your fruit, it makes no change if you call GetDrawer or call Drawer.Draw, In fact both of them has same dependency. but your choice makes it harder to call the code. (just adds extra work nothing else). –  Saeed Amiri Dec 28 '11 at 16:04
    
@SaeedAmiri This comment space is too little to explain model - ui logic separation –  parapura rajkumar Dec 28 '11 at 16:10
1  
It seems that the visitor pattern is the silver bullet I searched for! –  Cyril Gandon Dec 28 '11 at 16:13

Perhaps you could do an abstract class Fruit with the Draw method, and an abstract class FruitDrawer accordingly.

For example:


public abstract class Fruit {
  ...
}

public abstract class FruitDrawer {
  public void Draw(Fruit f, Graphics g)
  {
    ...
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
How did I call the right drawer then ? –  Cyril Gandon Dec 28 '11 at 15:51
    
FruitDrawer.Draw would have the common elements of any fruit to be drawn. You can use the pattern @parapura rajkumar proposed. –  Joel Alejandro Dec 28 '11 at 15:54
    
In this way again you will have if-then-else in FruitDrawer class, nothing goes to change. –  Saeed Amiri Dec 28 '11 at 15:55

You've basically regurgitated the canonical example of an Open-Closed Principle violation but with fruit instead of shapes.

One could dive into all your questions, but if you study the SOLID Principles, you'll learn so much more.

Per requests, I will dive into your code.

First off I would push Draw into the IFruit interface so that each fruit is responsible for drawing itself instead of the controller class manipulating everything. You could end up with Single Responsibility (S in SOLID) violations but that would be another refactoring. The important thing here is that the fruits draw themselves and the controller is open for extension (adding more fruit classes) but closed for modifications (since they draw themselves, the controller never changes).

Then you end up with a simple loop drawing your fruit.

foreach(var fruit in fruits)
    fruit.Draw(...);

To address the "how to not [break] them" comment...

Knowing what they are is the first step on a career of learning and applying them. The simplest way to avoid breaking them (and it's not exactly simple) is to be very strict about test-driven development. Much of what you've given as examples would be very hard to consciously do via TDD. In other words, if you're aware of the SOLID principles and doing TDD, you would not end up with the code you posted.

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2  
I'm not even the one who asked the question, and I'd still prefer that you dove into at least some of the questions. Yes, it's always true that you'l learn a lot more by reading and studying pages of text or taking a course, but if everyone did that, there wouldn't be a whole lot of point to a website like this one. Consider at least summarizing the design principles that you cite, and what a possible "fix" (improved design) might entail. –  Cody Gray Dec 28 '11 at 15:57
    
True, because I read the Solid principles, and it is because I read them that I know I broke them. But I still don't know HOW to not broke them ! –  Cyril Gandon Dec 28 '11 at 16:04
    
@CodyGray: Edited per your request. –  Austin Salonen Dec 28 '11 at 16:09
    
@Scorpi0: Edited per your comment. –  Austin Salonen Dec 28 '11 at 16:13

I think is better to do like this:

interface IFruit
{
   void Draw();
}

class Banana : IFruit
{
   void Draw()
   {
      BananaDrawer drawer = new BananaDrawer();
      drawer.Draw();
   }
}

and use it simply:

foreach(var fruit in fruits)
   fruit.Draw();

In fact in this way you can run extra initialization for specific drawer in the related fruit.

share|improve this answer
    
I have thinked of that, I just need to make a partial class because the fruit and the drawer are on different layer. Is this the best method ? –  Cyril Gandon Dec 28 '11 at 15:53
    
@Scorpi0, this is what comes in my mind, I don't know is best one or not, but comparing to other currently available answers I think is best one. In fact you can separate them by just using interfaces not concrete class, I didn't do this just for abbreviation to say main part. –  Saeed Amiri Dec 28 '11 at 15:59

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