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Given:

int x = 10;
double d = -3.0;
boolean f = false;

1.

Why does the following remain a double after it is cast as an int... For the second one also, why does it output a float when defined as a long?:

(int) d / 2.0
(long) d * 2f

2.

Why does the first of the following print a string(?), and the latter a number?

"2" + x + 2
"3" + 3 * x

But then there is an error with the following:

"5" + i + 2

3.

Also, with the follwing, what is actually happening and what is the result?

d++ + d

4.

When Math.round is used, why does it convert the following double into a float, or are they the same thing?

Math.round(x / d)
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What is i?... –  Oli Charlesworth Dec 28 '11 at 16:05
    
These are lots of unrelated questions, which doesn't make it a great fit for SO... –  Oli Charlesworth Dec 28 '11 at 16:05
    
The first and second ones are operator precedence (introcs.cs.princeton.edu/java/11precedence), the third oneis missing context (what's i?) and the last one: just try it. –  DaDaDom Dec 28 '11 at 16:06
    
'i' is just 'i'. –  mino Dec 28 '11 at 16:07
    
Is this a homework assignment? If so, please use the appropriate tag. –  DaDaDom Dec 28 '11 at 16:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why does the following remain a double after it is cast as an int... For the second one also, why does it output a float when defined as a long?:

(int) d / 2.0
(long) d * 2f

Because priority of cast (int) operator is higher that / and * operators. You should read it like this:

((int) d) / 2.0

((long) d) * 2f

Why does the first of the following print a string(?), and the latter a number?

"2" + x + 2
"3" + 3 * x

I think it's string in both casesm you must "read" this expressions like this:

("2" + x) + 2
"3" + (3 * x)

But then there is an error with the following:

"5" + i + 2

What is the error?

Also, with the follwing, what is actually happening and what is the result?

d++ + d

This is a sequence of actions:

  1. tmp = d
  2. d = d + 1
  3. return tmp + d

When Math.round is used, why does it convert the following double into a float, or are they the same thing?

Math.round(x / d)

It converts to long, because return type of Math.round(double) is long

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1.

This:

(int) d / 2.0

is the same as this:

((int) d) / 2.0

Perhaps you meant this?

(int)(d / 2.0)

2.

They both "print" strings (assuming you're talking about using them as the argument to System.out.println).

These:

"2" + x + 2
"3" + 3 * x

are the same as these:

("2" + x) + 2
"3" + (3 * x)

which are the same as these (assuming x = 10):

("2" + 10) + 2
"3" + 30

which are the same as these:

"2102"
"330"

3.

I can't remember what should happen here. But you should never need/want to write code like that, so it doesn't matter!

4.

The return type of Math.round is an integer type, not a floating-point type.

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(int) d / 2.0
(long) d * 2f

You still do floating point math, i.e. one operand is still a double/float and thus the result is a double/float.

"2" + x + 2
"3" + 3 * x

The first would just be concatenation, i.e. the type of the expression is String and thus all operands are converted to a string. For x=1 you'd get "212".

The second is subject to operator precendence, i.e. * is evaluated before + and thus the expression 3 * x is an integer math operation whose result will then be converted to a string by "3" + result.

"5" + i + 2

The error lies in your code, post the exception. Most probably i is undefined.

d++ + d

Have a look at operator precedence and post increment operators. x++ would return the value of x and then increment it. Then the previous value of x will be added to the new value. You can think of it being similar to x + (x+1).

When Math.round is used, why does it convert the following double into a float, or are they the same thing?

Math.round(x / d)

There's no conversion, just an overloaded method (one taking a double and one taking a float). Basically float has less precision than double but both are floating point numbers.

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Too many questions in one.

  • You're casting the operand, not the expression, and types will be promoted.
  • What do they actually print, and how are you differentiating their types? Check out Java operator precedence.
  • Because there's no i.
  • You can print the result.

The Conversions and Promotions JLS section may also be helpful; many of your questions are answered there.

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