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Edit: From another question I provided an answer that has links to a lot of questions/answers about singletons: More info about singletons here:

So I have read the thread Singletons: good design or a crutch?
And the argument still rages.

I see Singletons as a Design Pattern (good and bad).

The problem with Singleton is not the Pattern but rather the users (sorry everybody). Everybody and their father thinks they can implement one correctly (and from the many interviews I have done, most people can't). Also because everybody thinks they can implement a correct Singleton they abuse the Pattern and use it in situations that are not appropriate (replacing global variables with Singletons!).

So the main questions that need to be answered are:

  • When should you use a Singleton
  • How do you implement a Singleton correctly

My hope for this article is that we can collect together in a single place (rather than having to google and search multiple sites) an authoritative source of when (and then how) to use a Singleton correctly. Also appropriate would be a list of Anti-Usages and common bad implementations explaining why they fail to work and for good implementations their weaknesses.


So get the ball rolling:
I will hold my hand up and say this is what I use but probably has problems.
I like "Scott Myers" handling of the subject in his books "Effective C++"

Good Situations to use Singletons (not many):

  • Logging frameworks
  • Thread recycling pools
/*
 * C++ Singleton
 * Limitation: Single Threaded Design
 * See: http://www.aristeia.com/Papers/DDJ_Jul_Aug_2004_revised.pdf
 *      For problems associated with locking in multi threaded applications
 *
 * Limitation:
 * If you use this Singleton (A) within a destructor of another Singleton (B)
 * This Singleton (A) must be fully constructed before the constructor of (B)
 * is called.
 */
class MySingleton
{
    private:
        // Private Constructor
        MySingleton();
        // Stop the compiler generating methods of copy the object
        MySingleton(MySingleton const& copy);            // Not Implemented
        MySingleton& operator=(MySingleton const& copy); // Not Implemented

    public:
        static MySingleton& getInstance()
        {
            // The only instance
            // Guaranteed to be lazy initialized
            // Guaranteed that it will be destroyed correctly
            static MySingleton instance;
            return instance;
        }
};

OK. Lets get some criticism and other implementations together.
:-)

share|improve this question
1  
Pedantry: *Singleton –  GEOCHET Sep 17 '08 at 19:22
18  
What if you later decide you want multiple loggers? Or multiple thread pools? If you only want one logger, then only create one instance and make it global. Singletons are only good if you absolutely NEED there to only ever be one and it NEEDS to be global, IMHO. –  Dan Mar 3 '09 at 11:43
3  
Your HO is correct. –  Loki Astari Mar 4 '09 at 0:30
2  
Who said a framework can only have 1 logger instance. One singelton representing Framework. Framwork can then give you specific loggers. –  Loki Astari Mar 4 '09 at 0:32
    
Yea. I would not use a singeltong as a threadpool. Just throwing out ideas to spark answers. –  Loki Astari Mar 4 '09 at 0:32

21 Answers 21

up vote 94 down vote accepted

All of you are wrong. Read the question. Answer:

Use a Singleton if:

  • If you need to have one and only one object of a type in system

Do not use a Singleton if:

  • If you want to save memory
  • If you want to try something new
  • If you want to show off how much you know
  • Because everyone else is doing it (See cargo cult programmer in wikipedia)
  • In user interface widgets
  • It is supposed to be a cache
  • In strings
  • In Sessions
  • I can go all day long

How to create the best singleton:

  • The smaller, the better. I am a minimalist
  • Make sure it is thread safe
  • Make sure it is never null
  • Make sure it is created only once
  • Lazy or system initialization? Up to your requirements
  • Sometimes the OS or the JVM creates singletons for you (e.g. in Java every class definition is a singleton)
  • Provide a destructor or somehow figure out how to dispose resources
  • Use little memory
share|improve this answer
3  
wikipedia link: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cargo_cult_programming –  alex Jan 8 '09 at 3:11
11  
Actually, I think you are not quite correct either. I'd rephrase as: "If you need to have one and only one object of a type in system AND you need to have global access to it" Emphasis on need is mine - don't do it if its convenient, only if you MUST have it. –  Dan Mar 3 '09 at 11:40
62  
You're wrong too. If you need one and only one object, you create one and only one. If there is no logical way that two instances could ever be accomodated without irreversibly corrupting the application, you should consider making it a singleton. And then there's the other aspect, global access: If you don't need global access to the instance, it shouldn't be a singleton. –  jalf Apr 17 '09 at 18:36
2  
Closed for modification, open for extension. The problem is that you can't extend a singleton to be a duoton or a tripleton. It's stuck as a singleton. –  Lee Louviere Jul 29 '11 at 15:37
1  
@enzom83: A capital-S Singleton includes code to ensure its singleness. If you only want one instance, you can lose that code and simply create one instance yourself...giving you the memory savings of a single instance, plus the savings from the obviation of singleness-enforcing code -- which also means not sacrificing the ability to create a second instance if ever your requirements change. –  cHao Jan 6 at 0:05

Singletons give you the ability to combine two bad traits in one class. That's wrong in pretty much every way.

A singleton gives you:

  1. Global access to an object, and
  2. A guarantee that no more than one object of this type can ever be created

Number one is straightforward. Globals are generally bad. We should never make objects globally accessible unless we really need it.

Number two may sound like it makes sense, but let's think about it. When was the last time you *accidentally created a new object instead of referencing an existing one? Since this is tagged C++, let's use an example from that language. Do you often accidentally write

std::ostream os;
os << "hello world\n";

When you intended to write

std::cout << "hello world\n";

Of course not. We don't need protection against this error, because that kind of error just doesn't happen. If it does, the correct response is to go home and sleep for 12-20 hours and hope you feel better.

If only one object is needed, simply create one instance. If one object should be globally accessible, make it a global. But that doesn't mean it should be impossible to create other instances of it.

The "only one instance is possible" constraint doesn't really protect us against likely bugs. But it does make our code very hard to refactor and maintain. Because quite often we find out later that we did need more than one instance. We do have more than one database, we do have more than one configuration object, we do want several loggers. Our unit tests may want to be able to create and recreate these objects every test, to take a common example.

So a singleton should be used if and only if, we need both the traits it offers: If we need global access (which is rare, because globals are generally discouraged) and we need to prevent anyone from ever creating more than one instance of a class (which sounds to me like a design issue. The only reason I can see for this is if creating two instances would corrupt our application state - probably because the class contains a number of static members or similar silliness. In which case the obvious answer is to fix that class. It shouldn't depend on being the only instance.

If you need global access to an object, make it a global, like std::cout. But don't constrain the number of instances that can be created.

If you absolutely positively need to constrain the number of instances of a class to one, and there is no way creating two instances can ever be handled safely, then enforce that. But don't make it globally accessible as well.

If you do need both traits, then 1) make it a singleton, and 2) let me know what you need that for, because I'm having a hard time imagining such a case.

share|improve this answer
3  
or you could make it a global, and get only one of the downsides of a singleton. With the singleton, you'd simultaneously limit yourself to one instance of that database cllass. Why do that? Or you could look at why you have so many dependencies that the instantiation list becomes "really long". Are they all necessary? Should some of them be delegated out to other components? Perhaps some of them could be packaged together in a struct so we can pass them around as a single argument. There are plenty of solutions, all of them better than singletons. –  jalf Jul 14 '09 at 22:08
1  
I don't know. That's the key. I might at some point want another instance of the database class. Is it so hard to imagine that an application connects to more than one database? It doesn't seem so strange to me. But more importantly why paint yourself into a corner? If you suspect you only need one instance, then create one instance and make it global. It's not like you "accidentally" create new databases just because the constructor is public. So create one instance, make it global, and leave it at that. There's just no point in preventing me from creating another instance if I decide to. –  jalf Jul 15 '09 at 13:13
6  
Yes, a singleton might be justified there. But I think you've just proven my point that it's only necessary in pretty exotic cases. Most software does not deal with snow plowing hardware. But I'm still not convinced. I agree that in your actual application you only want one of these. But what about your unit tests? Each of them should run in isolation, so they should ideally create their own SpreaderController - which is hard to do with a singleton. Finally, why would your coworkers create multiple instances in the first place? Is that a realistic scenario to protect against? –  jalf Jul 15 '09 at 14:53
3  
And a point you missed is that while your last two examples arguably justify the "only one instance" limitation, they do nothing to justify the "globally accessible" one. Why on Earth should the entire codebase be able to acces your telephone switch's administration unit? The point in a singleton is to give you both traits. If you just need one or the other, you shouldn't use a singleton. –  jalf Jul 15 '09 at 14:59
2  
@ jalf - My goal was just to give you an example of where Singleton is useful in the wild, since you couldn't imagine any; I guess you don't see to many times to apply it your current line of work. I switched into snow plow programming from business applications solely because it would allow me to use Singleton. :) j/k I do agree with your premise that there are better ways to do these things, you've given me much to think about. Thanks for the discussion! –  J. Polfer Jul 15 '09 at 15:58

The problem with singletons is not their implementation. It is that they conflate two different concepts, neither of which is obviously desirable.

1) Singletons provide a global access mechanism to an object. Although they might be marginally more threadsafe or marginally more reliable in languages without a well-defined initialization order, this usage is still the moral equivalent of a global variable. It's a global variable dressed up in some awkward syntax (foo::get_instance() instead of g_foo, say), but it serves the exact same purpose (a single object accessible across the entire program) and has the exact same drawbacks.

2) Singletons prevent multiple instantiations of a class. It's rare, IME, that this kind of feature should be baked into a class. It's normally a much more contextual thing; a lot of the things that are regarded as one-and-only-one are really just happens-to-be-only-one. IMO a more appropriate solution is to just create only one instance--until you realize that you need more than one instance.

share|improve this answer
5  
Agreed. Two wrongs may make a right according to some, in the real world. But in programming, mixing two bad ideas does not result in a good one. –  jalf Apr 17 '09 at 18:49

One thing with patterns: don't generalize. They have all cases when they're useful, and when they fail.

Singleton can be nasty when you have to test the code. You're generally stuck with one instance of the class, and can choose between opening up a door in constructor or some method to reset the state and so on.

Other problem is that the Singleton in fact is nothing more than a global variable in disguise. When you have too much global shared state over your program, things tend to go back, we all know it.

It may make dependency tracking harder. When everything depends on your Singleton, it's harder to change it, split to two, etc. You're generally stuck with it. This also hampers flexibility. Investigate some Dependency Injection framework to try to alleviate this issue.

share|improve this answer
5  
No, a singleton is a lot more than a global variable in disguise. That's what makes it especially bad. It combines the global-ness (which is usually bad) with another concept which is also bad (that of not letting the programmer instantiate a class if he decides he needs an instance) They are often used as global variables, yes. And then they drag in the other nasty side effect as well, and cripple the codebase. –  jalf Apr 17 '09 at 18:51
7  
It should also be noted that singletons don't have to have public accessibility. A singleton can very well be internal to the library and never exposed to the user. So they're not necessarily "global" in that sense. –  SnOrfus Apr 17 '09 at 19:15
    
+1 for pointing out how much of a pain Singletons are in testing. –  DevSolar Mar 2 '11 at 13:23
1  
@jalf Not allowing someone to create more than one instance of a class is not a bad thing. If there is really only ever to be one instance of the class instantiated that enforces the requirement. If someone decides later that they need to create another instance they should refactor it, because it should never have been a singleton in the first place. –  William Apr 23 '12 at 18:16
    
@William: once something is made a singleton, it becomes incredibly hard to refactor. Now, can you give me a single reason for why it would ever be a good idea to enforce such a "one instance only" limitation? A single example of a situation where it is undoubtedly the right thing to do? –  jalf Apr 23 '12 at 18:33

Singletons basically let you have complex global state in languages which otherwise make it difficult or impossible to have complex global variables.

Java in particular uses singletons as a replacement for global variables, since everything must be contained within a class. The closest it comes to global variables are public static variables, which may be used as if they were global with import static

C++ does have global variables, but the order in which constructors of global class variables are invoked is undefined. As such, a singleton lets you defer the creation of a global variable until the first time that variable is needed.

Languages such as Python and Ruby use singletons very little because you can use global variables within a module instead.

So when is it good/bad to use a singleton? Pretty much exactly when it would be good/bad to use a global variable.

share|improve this answer
    
When ever is a global variable "good"? Sometimes they're the best workaround for a problem, but they are never "good". –  DevSolar Mar 2 '11 at 13:27
1  
global variable is good when it is used everywhere, and everything can have access to it. A implementation of a single state turing machine can make use of a singleton. –  Lee Louviere Jul 29 '11 at 15:33
    
I like the layer of indirection in this answer: "when it would be good/bad to use a global". Both DevSolar and Lee Louviere get the value they agree with even though at answertime it could not have been known who would comment. –  Praxeolitic May 26 at 23:35
  • How do you implement a Singleton correctly

There's one issue I've never seen mentioned, something I ran into at a previous job. We had C++ singletons that were shared between DLLs, and the usual mechanics of ensuring a single instance of a class just don't work. The problem is that each DLL gets its own set of static variables, along with the EXE. If your get_instance function is inline or part of a static library, each DLL will wind up with it's own copy of the "singleton".

The solution is to make sure the singleton code is only defined in one DLL or EXE, or create a singleton manager with those properties to parcel out instances.

share|improve this answer
2  
Yo dawg, I heard you liked Singletons, so I made a Singleton for your Singleton, so you can anti-pattern while you anti-pattern. –  Eva Feb 24 '13 at 19:56
    
@Eva, yeah something like that. I didn't create the problem, I just had to make it work somehow. –  Mark Ransom Feb 24 '13 at 22:30

The first example isn't thread safe - if two threads call getInstance at the same time, that static is going to be a PITA. Some form of mutex would help.

share|improve this answer
    
Yep that is noted in the comments above: * Limitation: Single Threaded Design * See: aristeia.com/Papers/DDJ_Jul_Aug_2004_revised.pdf * For problems associated with locking in multi threaded applications –  Loki Astari Sep 17 '08 at 19:22
    
The classic singleton with only getInstance as static method and instance methods for other operations can never be made thread safe. (well unless you make it a single-per-thread-ton using thread local storage...) –  Tobi Sep 17 '08 at 19:22

Modern C++ Design by Alexandrescu has a thread-safe, inherietence-safe generic singleton.

For my 2p-worth, I think it's important to have defined lifetimes for your singletons (when it's absolutely necessary to use them). I normally don't let the static get() function instantiate anything, and leave set up and destruction to some dedicated section of the main app. This helps highlight dependencies between singletons but as stressed above it's best to just avoid them if possible.

share|improve this answer
3  
That book rules! –  CVertex May 1 '09 at 9:08

Singletons are handy when you've got a lot code being run when you initialize and object. For example, when you using iBatis when you setup a persistence object it has to read all the configs, parse the maps, make sure its all correct, etc.. before getting to your code.

If you did this every time, performance would be much degraded. Using it in a singleton, you take that hit once and then all subsequent calls don't have to do it.

share|improve this answer
    
The Prototype Pattern does this as well, and it's more flexible. You can also use it when your client will make many instances of your expensive class, but only a limited number of them actually have different state. For example, tetronimos in Tetris. –  Eva Feb 24 '13 at 19:52

The real downfall of Singletons is that they break inheritance. You can't derive a new class to give you extended functionality unless you have access to the code where the Singleton is referenced. So, beyond the fact the the Singleton will make your code tightly coupled (fixable by a Strategy Pattern ... aka Dependency Injection) it will also prevent you from closing off sections of the code from revision (shared libraries).

So even the examples of loggers or thread pools are invalid and should be replaced by Strategies.

share|improve this answer
    
Loggers themselves should not be singletons. The general "broadcast" messaging system should be. Loggers themselves are subscribers to the broadcast messages. –  CashCow Mar 2 '11 at 12:25
    
Thread-pools should also not be singletons. The general question is would you ever want more than one of them? Yes. When I last used them we had 3 different thread-pools in one application. –  CashCow Mar 2 '11 at 12:26

Most people use singletons when they are trying to make themselves feel good about using a global variable. There are legitimate uses, but most of the time when people use them, the fact that there can only be one instance is just a trivial fact compared to the fact that it's globally accessible.

share|improve this answer

Because a singleton only allows one instance to be created it effectively controls instance replication. for example you'd not need multiple instances of a lookup - a morse lookup map for example, thus wrapping it in a singleton class is apt. And just because you have a single instance of the class does not mean you are also limited on the number of references to that instance. You can queue calls(to avoid threading issues) to the instance and effect changes necessary. Yes, the general form of a singleton is a globally public one, you can certainly modify the design to create a more access restricted singleton. I haven't tired this before but I sure know it is possible. And to all those who commented saying the singleton pattern is utterly evil you should know this: yes it is evil if you do not use it properly or within it confines of effective functionality and predictable behavior: do not GENERALIZE.

share|improve this answer

As others have noted, major downsides to singletons include the inability to extend them, and losing the power to instantiate more than one instance, e.g. for testing purposes.

Some useful aspects of singletons:

1) lazy or upfront instantiation

2) handy for an object which requires setup and/or state

However, you don't have to use a singleton to get these benefits. You can write a normal object that does the work, and then have people access it via a factory (a separate object). The factory can worry about only instantiating one, and reusing it, etc., if need be. Also, if you program to an interface rather than a concrete class, the factory can use strategies, i.e. you can switch in and out various impls of the interface.

Finally, a factory lends itself to dependency injection technologies like spring etc.

share|improve this answer

I use Singletons as an interview test.

When I ask a developer to name some design patterns, if all they can name is Singleton, they're not hired.

share|improve this answer
38  
Hard and fast rules about hiring will make you miss out on a wide diversity of potential employees. –  Karl Apr 17 '09 at 17:26
13  
A wide diversity of idiots exist. That doesn't mean they should be considered for hiring. If someone can mention no design patterns at all, I think they'd be preferable over someone who knows the singleton, and no other patterns. –  jalf Apr 17 '09 at 18:50
3  
For the record book - my response was tongue-in-cheek. In my actual interview process, I try to assess if we will need to tutor someone in C++, and how hard that will be. Some of my favorite candidates are people who DON'T know C++ inside-and-out, but I was able to have a great conversation with them about it. –  Matt Cruikshank Apr 27 '09 at 16:54
4  
Down vote. From my personal experience - programmer may not be able name any other patterns but Singleton, but that doesn't mean that he uses Singletons. Personally, I was using singletons in my code BEFORE I ever heard of them (I called them "smarter globals" - I knew what the global is). When I learned about them, when I learned about their pros and cons - I stopped using them. Suddenly, Unit testing became much more interesting to me when I stopped... Does that made me a worse programmer? Pfff... –  Paulius Jun 17 '09 at 18:53
3  
I am also downvoting for the "name some design patterns" nonsense question. Designing is about understanding how to apply design patterns, not just being able to reel off their names. Ok, that may not warrant a downvote but this answer is troll-ish. –  CashCow Mar 2 '11 at 12:22

But when I need something like a Singleton, I often end up using a Schwarz Counter to instantiate it.

share|improve this answer

Anti-Usage:

One major problem with excessive singleton usage is that the pattern prevents easy extension and swapping of alternate implementations. The class-name is hard coded wherever the singleton is used.

share|improve this answer
    
Downvoted for 2 reasons: 1. Singleton can internally use polymorphic instances (for example, global Logger uses polymorphic strategies of targetting) 2. There can be typedef for singleton name, so code factically depends on typedef. –  topright gamedev Feb 10 '11 at 17:30

I think this is the most robust version for C#:

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Threading;

namespace DoFactory.GangOfFour.Singleton.RealWorld
{

  // MainApp test application

  class MainApp
  {
    static void Main()
    {
      LoadBalancer b1 = LoadBalancer.GetLoadBalancer();
      LoadBalancer b2 = LoadBalancer.GetLoadBalancer();
      LoadBalancer b3 = LoadBalancer.GetLoadBalancer();
      LoadBalancer b4 = LoadBalancer.GetLoadBalancer();

      // Same instance?
      if (b1 == b2 && b2 == b3 && b3 == b4)
      {
        Console.WriteLine("Same instance\n");
      }

      // All are the same instance -- use b1 arbitrarily
      // Load balance 15 server requests
      for (int i = 0; i < 15; i++)
      {
        Console.WriteLine(b1.Server);
      }

      // Wait for user
      Console.Read();    
    }
  }

  // "Singleton"

  class LoadBalancer
  {
    private static LoadBalancer instance;
    private ArrayList servers = new ArrayList();

    private Random random = new Random();

    // Lock synchronization object
    private static object syncLock = new object();

    // Constructor (protected)
    protected LoadBalancer()
    {
      // List of available servers
      servers.Add("ServerI");
      servers.Add("ServerII");
      servers.Add("ServerIII");
      servers.Add("ServerIV");
      servers.Add("ServerV");
    }

    public static LoadBalancer GetLoadBalancer()
    {
      // Support multithreaded applications through
      // 'Double checked locking' pattern which (once
      // the instance exists) avoids locking each
      // time the method is invoked
      if (instance == null)
      {
        lock (syncLock)
        {
          if (instance == null)
          {
            instance = new LoadBalancer();
          }
        }
      }

      return instance;
    }

    // Simple, but effective random load balancer

    public string Server
    {
      get
      {
        int r = random.Next(servers.Count);
        return servers[r].ToString();
      }
    }
  }
}

Here is the .NET-optimised version:

using System;
using System.Collections;

namespace DoFactory.GangOfFour.Singleton.NETOptimized
{

  // MainApp test application

  class MainApp
  {

    static void Main()
    {
      LoadBalancer b1 = LoadBalancer.GetLoadBalancer();
      LoadBalancer b2 = LoadBalancer.GetLoadBalancer();
      LoadBalancer b3 = LoadBalancer.GetLoadBalancer();
      LoadBalancer b4 = LoadBalancer.GetLoadBalancer();

      // Confirm these are the same instance
      if (b1 == b2 && b2 == b3 && b3 == b4)
      {
        Console.WriteLine("Same instance\n");
      }

      // All are the same instance -- use b1 arbitrarily
      // Load balance 15 requests for a server
      for (int i = 0; i < 15; i++)
      {
        Console.WriteLine(b1.Server);
      }

      // Wait for user
      Console.Read();    
    }
  }

  // Singleton

  sealed class LoadBalancer
  {
    // Static members are lazily initialized.
    // .NET guarantees thread safety for static initialization
    private static readonly LoadBalancer instance =
      new LoadBalancer();

    private ArrayList servers = new ArrayList();
    private Random random = new Random();

    // Note: constructor is private.
    private LoadBalancer()
    {
      // List of available servers
      servers.Add("ServerI");
      servers.Add("ServerII");
      servers.Add("ServerIII");
      servers.Add("ServerIV");
      servers.Add("ServerV");
    }

    public static LoadBalancer GetLoadBalancer()
    {
      return instance;
    }

    // Simple, but effective load balancer
    public string Server
    {
      get
      {
        int r = random.Next(servers.Count);
        return servers[r].ToString();
      }
    }
  }
}

You can find this pattern at dotfactory.com.

share|improve this answer
2  
You could strip out the parts that are not specifically relavent to Singletons to make the code easier to read. –  Loki Astari Sep 17 '08 at 23:46
    
Also, your first version is not thread-safe because of possible read/write reordering. See stackoverflow.com/questions/9666/… –  Thomas Danecker Sep 19 '08 at 13:24
1  
You'd have to make instance volatile to be thread-safe. –  Thomas Danecker Sep 19 '08 at 13:28
4  
Uh... wrong language? The question is pretty obviously tagged C++. –  DevSolar Mar 2 '11 at 13:31

The Meyers singleton pattern works well enough most of the time, and on the occasions it does it doesn't necessarily pay to look for anything better. As long as the constructor will never throw and there are no dependencies between singletons.

A singleton is an implementation for a globally-accessible object (GAO from now on) although not all GAOs are singletons.

Loggers themselves should not be singletons but the means to log should ideally be globally-accessible, to decouple where the log message is being generated from where or how it gets logged.

Lazy-loading / lazy evaluation is a different concept and singleton usually implements that too. It comes with a lot of its own issues, in particular thread-safety and issues if it fails with exceptions such that what seemed like a good idea at the time turns out to be not so great after all. (A bit like COW implementation in strings).

With that in mind, GOAs can be initialised like this:

namespace {

T1 * pt1 = NULL;
T2 * pt2 = NULL;
T3 * pt3 = NULL;
T4 * pt4 = NULL;

}

int main( int argc, char* argv[])
{
   T1 t1(args1);
   T2 t2(args2);
   T3 t3(args3);
   T4 t4(args4);

   pt1 = &t1;
   pt2 = &t2;
   pt3 = &t3;
   pt4 = &t4;

   dostuff();

}

T1& getT1()
{
   return *pt1;
}

T2& getT2()
{
   return *pt2;
}

T3& getT3()
{
  return *pt3;
}

T4& getT4()
{
  return *pt4;
}

It does not need to be done as crudely as that, and clearly in a loaded library that contains objects you probably want some other mechanism to manage their lifetime. (Put them in an object that you get when you load the library).

As for when I use singletons? I used them for 2 things - A singleton table that indicates what libraries have been loaded with dlopen - A message handler that loggers can subscribe to and that you can send messages to. Required specifically for signal handlers.

share|improve this answer

I still don't get why a singleton has to be global.

I was going to produce a singleton where I hid a database inside the class as a private constant static variable and make class functions that utilize the database without ever exposing the database to the user.

I don't see why this functionality would be bad.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand why you think it has to be a global. –  Loki Astari Jan 31 at 4:11
    
according to this thread, Everybody was saying a singleton has to be global –  Zachary Kraus Jan 31 at 4:28
1  
No. The thread indicates that a singelton has global state. Not that it is a global variable. The solution you propose has global state. The solution you propose is also using a global variable; a static member of a class is an object of "Static Storage Duration" a global variable is an object of "Static Storage Duration". Thus the two are basically the same thing with slightly different semantics/scopes. –  Loki Astari Jan 31 at 6:29
    
So a private static variable is still global due to the "Static Storage Duration"? –  Zachary Kraus Jan 31 at 14:27
1  
Note: You missed my deliberately none stated bit. Your design of using a static "private" member is not bad in the same way as a singelton. Because it does not introduce "global mutable state". But it is not a singleton either. A singleton is a class that is designed so only one instance of the object can exist. What you are suggesting is single shared state for all objects of a class. Different concept. –  Loki Astari Jan 31 at 17:18

Another implementation

class Singleton
{
public:
    static Singleton& Instance()
    {
        // lazy initialize
        if (instance_ == NULL) instance_ = new Singleton();

        return *instance_;
    }

private:
    Singleton() {};

    static Singleton *instance_;
};
share|improve this answer
2  
That's really horrible. See: stackoverflow.com/questions/1008019/c-singleton-design-pattern/… for a better lazy initialization and more importantly guaranteed deterministic destruction. –  Loki Astari Jan 7 '12 at 20:45
    
If you're going to use pointers, Instance() should return a pointer, not a reference. Inside your .cpp file, initialize the instance to null: Singleton* Singleton::instance_ = nullptr;. And Instance() should be implemented as: if (instance_ == nullptr) instance_ = new Singleton(); return instance_;. –  Dennis Jun 30 '13 at 22:00

In desktop apps (I know, only us dinosaurs write these anymore!) they are essential for getting relatively unchanging global application settings - the user language, path to help files, user preferences etc which would otherwise have to propogate into every class and every dialog.

Edit - of course these should be read-only !

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But this is begging the question; why do the user language and path to the help file have to be instances method at all? –  DrPizza Sep 18 '08 at 12:18
2  
We have globals for that. There's no need for making them singletons –  jalf Apr 17 '09 at 18:46
    
Global variables - then how do you serialise them from registry/databse? Gobal class - then how do you ensure there is only one of them? –  Martin Beckett Apr 17 '09 at 20:51
    
@mgb: you serialize them by reading values from registry/database and storing them in the global variables (this should probably be done at the top of your main function). you ensure there is only one object of a class, by creating only one object of class... really... is that hard to 'grep -rn "new \+global_class_name" .' ? really? –  Paulius Jun 18 '09 at 21:18
6  
@mgb: Why on Earth would I ensure there is only one? I just need to know that one instance always represents the current settings. but there's no reason why I shouldn't be allowed to have other settings objects around the place. Perhaps one for "the settings the user is currently defining, but has not yet applied", for example. Or one for "the configuration the user saved earlier so he can return to them later". Or one for each of your unit tests. –  jalf Jul 14 '09 at 22:12

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