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Whats the best practice?

function A() {

   if (someClassValue > 0) {
       B();
   }

}

function B() {

   ...do smth, you expect (someClassValue > 0)...
}

here the coder might forget to check the conditions before calling, and run the system unconsistent... but from the logical point of view, the caller calls the function, therefore he should be responsible for conditions, when calling a function, on the other hand, its error prone

or

function A() {

   B();

}

function B() {

   if (someClassValue > 0) {
      return;
   }

   ...do smth...
}

this might look missleading from the view of body A

or

function A() {

   if (someClassValue > 0) {
       B();
   }

}

function B() {

   if (someClassValue > 0) {
      return;
   }

   ...do smth...
}

this is unnecessary double checking

whats the right approach? should a function check the condition to be executed, or should the function that calls this function check the conditions for calling B

share|improve this question
1  
There is no wrong or right way. It is always a trade off between performance and bullet proofing your code. – parapura rajkumar Dec 28 '11 at 16:48
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Rule: Always validate parameters in all publicly exposed functions.

Corollary: It's not necessary to validate parameters in any non-publicly exposed functions. This usually has some marginal performance benefit, but it also keeps your code clean and easier to read, especially if you follow otherwise good design patterns and have public-facing functions call down into consolidated private functions to do actual work.

If and only if profiling tells you that parameter validation is a significant bottleneck in your application should you become concerned with minimizing impact points and trimming them out where not absolutely necessary. Alternatively, you could leave them in for debug builds and remove them for release builds, minimizing the performance impact while still fulfilling their basic purpose as sanity checks. But I must say that I've never seen a parameter validation that was bottlenecking an application...

As for your question above (which I've conveniently ignored), it really doesn't matter which style you pick, so long as you follow the above rule(s). As is generally the case with questions tagged , the most important thing is to pick a style and stick with it—consistency is the real winner in the long term.

share|improve this answer
    
Well said indeed. +1 – Matt Ball Dec 28 '11 at 16:51
    
ok, so public should always control...but what about the caller of a public? should he assume that the function is always safe? and whats the best practice for private? to non-validate in a function, because its private doesn't look right too – Peter Lapisu Dec 28 '11 at 17:02
    
@Peter what do you mean by "the caller of a public?" Who is the caller - more of your own code, or someone else's code which consumes your functions? – Matt Ball Dec 28 '11 at 18:31
    
@Peter: Like Matt, I honestly am not sure if I understood your question. But yes, the caller of a public function should assume that the function is always safe. That's no reason to be sloppy and pass nonsense values, but there's no reason for explicit validation checks, either. If you think something is correct, then pass it. You want to find out that it's not correct so that you can fix the bug in your code. And no, there's no reason for private functions to validate: they get passed "known-valid" parameters from your public functions. – Cody Gray Dec 29 '11 at 6:22

It completely depends on the public API you're providing, and the corollary of whether or not a particular function can trust its input to be valid. There is always a tradeoff between coding defensively and writing clear, concise code.

Is B part of that public API? If so, I'd say you generally shouldn't trust input from unknown code (e.g. the consumer of your API), so do the checking in B.

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That depends on your program, sometimes you need to check all conditions sometimes you don't. If your constructor guarantees instantiation for all data members, then you only need to check your input on data that manipulates the data members. So just make sure that functions that accept parameters that alter data members are checked for null values, but even at that point it depends on the programming language you are using.

More information is needed if you want a more accurate answer.

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#2. You can't assume that every calling function will do the check properly.

share|improve this answer
    
This is why you have black box testing. You want to make sure that functions can handle erroneous calls. – ethrbunny Dec 28 '11 at 16:51

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