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I'm attempting to convert 7500 seconds to minutes, and then the minutes to hours. If it comes out to 2 hours and 5 minutes, as in this example, I'd like to display it as "2 hours and 5 minutes". If its 2 hours even, I just want it to display "2 hours".

7500 divided by 60 divided by 60 comes out to 2.083 (3 repeated). Why does the % return 0? How can I determine if its hours exactly, or if there are minutes to display?

die("Test: " . ((7500 / 60) / 60) % 1);
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1  
You'll always get a zero. Do you know what percentage sign does? –  N.B. Dec 28 '11 at 17:00
3  
Operands of modulus % are converted to integers (by stripping the decimal part) before processing. Your calculation ends up as 2 % 1 which results in 0 (you can fit two 1s in 2 with nothing left over) php.net/manual/en/language.operators.arithmetic.php –  Steve Fenton Dec 28 '11 at 17:08
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For conversion, you can use:

function secondsToWords($seconds)
{
    /*** return value ***/
    $ret = "";

    /*** get the hours ***/
    $hours = intval(intval($seconds) / 3600);
    if($hours > 0)
    {
        $ret .= "$hours hours ";
    }
    /*** get the minutes ***/
    $minutes = bcmod((intval($seconds) / 60),60);
    if($hours > 0 || $minutes > 0)
    {
        $ret .= "$minutes minutes ";
    }

    /*** get the seconds ***/
    $seconds = bcmod(intval($seconds),60);
    $ret .= "$seconds seconds";

    return $ret;
}
echo secondsToWords(7500);
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Just a nit-pick, but you might want to add a little logical function to your output for correctly pluralizing the time units: `function pluralize($unit, $amount) { return($amount.' '.$unit.(($amount == 1)?'':'s')); } –  PhpMyCoder Dec 28 '11 at 19:04
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Because that is the modulus operator, which gives the remainder of the division.

You want to use /, the division operator, that returns a float. See here

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I've created a nice function for that a while ago. It also does years and months (and anything you'd like) if you want.

Source + examples: http://hotblocks.nl/tests/time_ago.php

Function:

<?php
function time_ago( $f_seconds, $f_size = 2, $f_factor = 1.6 ) {
    $units = array(
        86400*365.25 => array(' year', ' years'),
        86400*30 => array(' month', ' months'),
        86400*7 => array(' week', ' weeks'),
        86400 => array(' day', ' days'),
        3600 => array(' hour', ' hours'),
        60 => array(' minute', ' minutes'),
        1 => array(' second', ' seconds'),
    );

    if ( isset($GLOBALS['g_units']) && is_array($GLOBALS['g_units']) ) {
        $units = $GLOBALS['g_units'];
    }

    $timeAgo = array();

    $seconds = (int)$f_seconds;
    foreach ( $units AS $range => $unit ) {
        if ( 1 == $range || $seconds >= $range * $f_factor ) {
            is_array($unit) || $unit = array($unit, $unit);

            $last = count($timeAgo) == $f_size-1;
            $round = $last ? 'round' : 'floor';

            $num = $round($seconds / $range);
            $timeAgo[] = $num . $unit[(int)(1 != $num)];

            if ( $last ) {
                break;
            }

            $seconds -= $num * $range;
        }
    }

    $separator = isset($GLOBALS['g_separator']) ? $GLOBALS['g_separator'] : ', ';
    return implode($separator, $timeAgo);
}
?>
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Nitpick: A year is not 365.25 days. Midnight on 1/1/2011 and midnight on 1/1/2012 are exactly one year apart, but with a 365.25-day year they'd be (a year minus 6 hours) apart. Likewise, a month is not 30 days -- the difference between 1/1/2011 and 1/1/2012 is 12 months, not 12 months and 5-6 days. –  cHao Dec 28 '11 at 17:14
    
Good enough for me. –  Rudie Dec 28 '11 at 21:33
    
Won't be good enough for someone who comes across your site and sees that 1/1/2011 and 1/1/2012 are "12 months 5 days" apart instead of "1 year". If i saw that, i'd have a pretty low opinion of whoever made it. Better to skip it altogether unless you really need a range that big...and if you do, you shouldn't be basing it on seconds. –  cHao Dec 28 '11 at 21:45
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That's the way the mod (%) operator works. Every integer is divisible by 1, so n % 1 = 0

for all integral n.

What are you trying to do with the % operator?

Whatever it is, you probably want to apply it on an integral value, like the number of seconds. It doesn't work for non-integral values; they are promoted to int values before the operator is applied.

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