Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a list of lists such as:
[[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]] I'm trying to create tuples of the form (1,4),(1,5),(1,6),(1,7),(1,8),(1,9),(2,4),(2,5),(4,7),(4,8),...

In other words, items in the first list should be tuples with items in subsequent lists, items in the second list, tuples with items from its subsequent lists and so on, until we get to the last list.

I'm a bit unsure of how a list comprehension in python here would work. Any ideas?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
Which language, Python? –  larsmans Dec 28 '11 at 17:11
    
Is this homework? What have you tried so far? –  Shamim Hafiz Dec 28 '11 at 17:13
    
yes i'm using python –  Duke Dec 28 '11 at 17:13
    
Tuple order doesn't matter for this case? i.e., it's sufficient to generate (4,7), you don't also have to generate (7,4)? –  A. Wilson Dec 28 '11 at 17:15
    
tuple order does matter. right now, i'm fiddling with print [(y,z) for z in lists for y in z for x in y] but in the case above, we only want (4,7) and not (7,4) –  Duke Dec 28 '11 at 17:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have a list of list (lol), then, pop first item from list of list and make cartesian product with concatenate remaining lists:

import itertools
lol = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]]
result = list()
while lol:
    l=lol.pop(0)
    o=itertools.chain(*lol)
    result += itertools.product( l,o )

result [(1, 4), (1, 5), (1, 6), (1, 7), (1, 8), (1, 9), (2, 4), (2, 5), (2, 6), (2, 7), (2, 8), (2, 9), (3, 4), (3, 5), (3, 6), (3, 7), (3, 8), (3, 9), (4, 7), (4, 8), (4, 9), (5, 7), (5, 8), (5, 9), (6, 7), (6, 8), (6, 9)]

share|improve this answer
    
lol, thanks. +1 for conciseness –  Duke Dec 28 '11 at 17:27
    
you are welcome, lol. –  danihp Jan 4 '12 at 22:05

A solution using just a big list comprehension would be:

WARNING: only for list comprehension lovers

sum([[(elem,e) for e in sum(my_lists[i+1:], [])] for i,my_list in enumerate(my_lists[:-1]) for j,elem in enumerate(my_list)], [])

Result:

[(1, 4), (1, 5), (1, 6), (1, 7), (1, 8), (1, 9), (2, 4), (2, 5), (2, 6), (2, 7), (2, 8), (2, 9), (3, 4), (3, 5), (3, 6), (3, 7), (3, 8), (3, 9), (4, 7), (4, 8), (4, 9), (5, 7), (5, 8), (5, 9), (6, 7), (6, 8), (6, 9)]
share|improve this answer
    
pretty neat! + 1 –  Duke Dec 28 '11 at 19:01
    
can you please explain how sum([],[]) above works? Couldn't find any documentation for it. thanks –  Duke Apr 16 '12 at 5:29
    
the second param in sum is like a initial value. Then, it starts adding (to that initial value) all the elements from the first param using +=. That's why sum([[1,2],[3]],[6]) returns [6,1,2,3] ([6]+[1,2]+[3]) –  juliomalegria Apr 25 '12 at 20:15

Without destroying the original list:

from itertools import chain, product
lol = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]]
list(chain(*(product(item, chain(*lol[index+1:])) for index, item in enumerate(lol))))
share|improve this answer
    
neat. i had to do a deepcopy before :-) –  Duke Dec 29 '11 at 21:14

The basic mechanism you want is called zip in functional programming. From the Haskell Prelude:

zip takes two lists and returns a list of corresponding pairs. If one input list is short, excess elements of the longer list are discarded.

There's a built-in zip() function in Python that does essentially the same thing.

share|improve this answer
    
how would i implement that? –  Duke Dec 28 '11 at 17:12
    
Built-in to Python: docs.python.org/library/functions.html#zip –  sczizzo Dec 28 '11 at 17:14
    
ok, i'll see if i can get that to work for more than two lists. –  Duke Dec 28 '11 at 17:18
    
It already does. It takes as many iterables as you need, evaluating them from left to right. –  sczizzo Dec 28 '11 at 17:22
    
-1 This doesn't do what the OP wants. OP wants every element of the first sublist to be paired with each element of the remaining sublists, for example. –  Karl Knechtel Dec 28 '11 at 19:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.