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Neither

sb.setBlendFunction(GL10.GL_ONE_MINUS_DST_COLOR, GL10.GL_ZERO);
sb.begin();
font.setColor(1, 1, 1, 1);
for (LineRect s: vertices){
     font.draw(sb,""+ s.x+","+.y, s.x, s.y);
}
sb.end();
sb.setBlendFunction(GL10.GL_ONE, GL10.GL_ONE_MINUS_SRC_ALPHA);

nor

Gdx.gl10.glEnable(GL10.GL_COLOR_LOGIC_OP);
Gdx.gl10.glLogicOp(GL10.GL_XOR);

    sb.begin();
    font.setColor(1, 1, 1, 1);
    for (LineRect s: vertices){
         font.draw(sb,""+ s.x+","+.y, s.x, s.y);
    }
    sb.end();


Gdx.gl10.glDisable(GL10.GL_COLOR_LOGIC_OP);

Worked for me, what am I doing wrong? How do I fix it?

The idea is to draw the font, which consists of quads with partially transparent textures, in a way it'll always be visible, unless the background is 50% grey. Background black = font renders white, and so on.

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1 Answer 1

You need to test the brightness of your background color. here is a method I made for AWT colors, should be really easy to adapt to libgdx Color class:

/**
 * Returns the brightness of the color, between 0 and 255.
 */
public static int getBrightness(Color c) {
    if (c == null) return -1;
    return (int) Math.sqrt(
        c.getRed() * c.getRed() * .241 +
        c.getGreen() * c.getGreen() * .691 +
        c.getBlue() * c.getBlue() * .068);
}

If the brightness is < 128, use a light foreground, else use a dark foreground.

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