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I created a simple grammar in AntlWorks. Then I generated code and I have two files: grammarLexer.java and grammarParser.java. My goal is to create mapping my grammar to java language. What should I do next to achieve it?

Here is my grammar: ` grammar grammar; prog : ((FOR | WHILE | IF | PRINT | DECLARATION | ENTER | (WS* FUNCTION) | VARIABLE) | FUNCTION_DEC)+;

FOR        :     WS* 'for' WS+ VARIABLE WS+ DIGIT+ WS+ DIGIT+ WS* ENTER  ( FOR | WHILE | IF | PRINT | DECLARATION | ENTER | (WS* FUNCTION) | INC_DEC )* WS* 'end' WS* ENTER;
WHILE        :     WS* 'while' WS+ (VARIABLE | DIGIT+) WS* EQ_OPERATOR WS* (VARIABLE | DIGIT+) WS* ENTER  (FOR | WHILE | IF | PRINT | DECLARATION | ENTER | (WS* FUNCTION) | (WS* INC_DEC))* WS* 'end' WS* ENTER;
IF        :         WS* 'if' WS+ ( FUNCTION | VARIABLE | DIGIT+) WS* EQ_OPERATOR WS* (VARIABLE | DIGIT+) WS* ENTER (FOR | WHILE | IF | PRINT | DECLARATION | ENTER | (WS* FUNCTION) | INC_DEC)* ( WS* 'else' ENTER (FOR | WHILE | IF | PRINT | DECLARATION | ENTER | (WS* FUNCTION) | (WS* INC_DEC))*)? WS* 'end' WS* ENTER;

CHAR        :     ('a'..'z'|'A'..'Z')+;
EQ_OPERATOR    :    ('<' | '>' | '==' | '>=' | '<=' | '!=');
DIGIT        :     '0'..'9'+;
ENTER        :     '\n';
WS        :     ' ' | '\t';

PRINT_TEMPLATE  :     WS+ (('"' (CHAR | DIGIT | WS)* '"') | VARIABLE | DIGIT+ | FUNCTION | INC_DEC);
PRINT             :     WS* 'print' PRINT_TEMPLATE (',' PRINT_TEMPLATE)*  WS* ENTER;

VARIABLE        :    CHAR(CHAR|DIGIT)*;
FUN_TEMPLATE    :    WS* (VARIABLE | DIGIT+ | '"' (CHAR | DIGIT | WS)* '"');
FUNCTION        :    VARIABLE '(' (FUN_TEMPLATE (WS* ',' FUN_TEMPLATE)*)? ')' WS* ENTER*;

DECLARATION     :    WS* VARIABLE WS* ('=' WS* (DIGIT+ | '"' (CHAR | DIGIT | WS)* '"' | VARIABLE)) WS* ENTER;
FUNCTION_DEC    :    WS*'def' WS* FUNCTION ( FOR | WHILE | IF | PRINT | DECLARATION | ENTER | (WS* FUNCTION) | INC_DEC )* WS* 'end' WS* ENTER*;

INC_DEC            :    VARIABLE ('--' | '++') WS* ENTER*;`

Here is my Main class for parser: `
import org.antlr.runtime.ANTLRStringStream; import org.antlr.runtime.CommonToken; import org.antlr.runtime.CommonTokenStream; import org.antlr.runtime.Parser;

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {  
        // the input source  
        String source =   
            "for i 1 3\n " +
            "printHi()\n " +
            "end\n " +
            "if fun(y, z) == 0\n " +
            "end\n ";
// create an instance of the lexer  
         grammarLexer lexer = new grammarLexer(new ANTLRStringStream(source));  

         // wrap a token-stream around the lexer  
         CommonTokenStream tokens = new CommonTokenStream(lexer);  

         // traverse the tokens and print them to see if the correct tokens are created  
         int n = 1;  
         for(Object o : tokens.getTokens()) {  
           CommonToken token = (CommonToken)o;  
           System.out.println("token(" + n + ") = " + token.getText().replace("\n", "\\n"));  
           n++;  
         }
         grammarParser parser = new grammarParser(tokens);
         parser.file();
}
}
`
share|improve this question
2  
Could you elaborate a bit? What are you trying to map exactly? An example would help greatly. –  Bart Kiers Dec 28 '11 at 18:44
    
Hi!, I read your blog - introduction to ANTLR. I found it very useful, thanks a lot! :) As you said there, I created Main class and String source represented some valid input of my grammar. Then I run the application and received output similar to this in your example :). Then I wanted to try with parser. I did everything what is in your blog, but now I have this problem: The method file() is undefined for the type grammarParser. Thanks fo your help :) –  ruhungry Dec 29 '11 at 13:41
1  
sorry, but I have no idea what you mean. Could you please edit your question and post your grammar and your main class and indicate what parts are causing the problem(s)? Thanks, and glad to hear you liked my blog articles! –  Bart Kiers Dec 29 '11 at 13:50
    
In my Main class in line: parser.file(); I've got message: The method file() is undefined for the type grammarParser –  ruhungry Dec 29 '11 at 14:01
1  
You're using almost only lexer rules: before continuing, you really must understand the difference between them. Lexer rules are the building blocks of your language (tokens), and parser rules "glue" these tokens together to form a meaningful succession of tokens. You're gluing tokens inside other tokens: not the way to go. –  Bart Kiers Dec 29 '11 at 14:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As I already mentioned in comments: your overuse of lexer rules is wrong. Look at lexer rules as being the fundamental building blocks of your language. Much like how you'd describe water in chemistry. You would not describe water like this:

WATER
 : 'HHO'
 ;

I.e.: as a single element. Water should be described as 3 separate elements:

water
 : Hydrogen Hydrogen Oxygen
 ;

Hydrogen : 'H';
Oxygen   : 'O';

where Hydrogen and Oxygen are the fundamental building blocks (lexer rules) and water is the compound (the parser rule).

A good rule of thumb is that if you're creating lexer rules that consist of several other lexer rules, chances are there's something fishy in your grammar. This is not always the case, of course.

Let's say you want to parse the following input:

for i 1 3
  print(i)
end

if fun(y, z) == 0
  print('foo')
end

A grammar could look like this:

grammar T;

options {
  output=AST;
}

tokens {
  BLOCK;
  CALL;
  PARAMS;
}

// parser rules
parse
 : block EOF!
 ;

block
 : stat* -> ^(BLOCK stat*)
 ;

stat
 : for_stat
 | if_stat
 | func_call
 ;

for_stat
 : FOR^ ID expr expr block END!
 ;

if_stat
 : IF^ expr block END!
 ;

expr
 : eq_expr
 ;

eq_expr
 : atom (('==' | '!=')^ atom)*
 ;

atom
 : func_call
 | INT
 | ID
 | STR
 ;

func_call
 : ID '(' params ')' -> ^(CALL ID params)
 ;

params
 : (expr (',' expr)*)? -> ^(PARAMS expr*)
 ;

// lexer rules
FOR : 'for';
END : 'end';
IF  : 'if';
ID  : ('a'..'z' | 'A'..'Z')+;
INT : '0'..'9'+;
STR : '\'' ~('\'')* '\'';
SP  : (' ' | '\t' | '\r' | '\n')+ {skip();};

And if you now run this test class:

import org.antlr.runtime.*;
import org.antlr.runtime.tree.*;
import org.antlr.stringtemplate.*;

public class Main {
  public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    String src = 
        "for i 1 3          \n" + 
        "  print(i)         \n" + 
        "end                \n" + 
        "                   \n" + 
        "if fun(y, z) == 0  \n" + 
        "  print('foo')     \n" + 
        "end                \n";
    TLexer lexer = new TLexer(new ANTLRStringStream(src));
    TParser parser = new TParser(new CommonTokenStream(lexer));
    CommonTree tree = (CommonTree)parser.parse().getTree();
    DOTTreeGenerator gen = new DOTTreeGenerator();
    StringTemplate st = gen.toDOT(tree);
    System.out.println(st);
  }
}

you'll see some output being printed to the console which corresponds to the following AST:

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
1  
@whiteangel, creating Java bytecodes and optimization of the AST is out of the scope of an SO answer. I recommend you get a hold of a copy of Terence Parr's Language Implementation Patterns where he explains how to produce bytecodes for a language in one of the later chapters. Good luck! –  Bart Kiers Jan 11 '12 at 10:07

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