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I have fully mastered the art of Perlin Noise in 3D, and now I'm trying to use my same implementation for a 2D algorithm. The problem seems to be in picking my gradient directions. In 3D I use 16 gradients in evenly distributed directions and this works great. In 2D I figured I'd use 8 gradients. up, down, left, right, and the four diagonal directions.

Here is what I get:

enter image description here

The general look of the noise is always correct, but the edges of the squares don't quite match up. I have also tried using other gradients or fewer gradients but get similar results. Here in another example you can see that the edges do match up sometimes and the results are fine in that area -

enter image description here

When I don't use gradients and instead just interpolate between a value picked randomly at each of the 4 corners I get the right results, which is what makes me think it is the gradient part that is messing it up.

Here is my code:

//8 different gradient directions
private Point[] grads = new Point[] { 
    new Point(0, 1), new Point(1, 1), new Point(1, 0), new Point(1, -1), 
    new Point(0, -1), new Point(-1, -1), new Point(-1, 0), new Point(-1, 1),};

//takes the dot product of a gradient and (x, y)
private float dot2D(int i, float x, float y)
{
    return
        grads[i].X * x + grads[i].Y * y;
}

public float Noise2D(float x, float y)
{
    int
        ix = (int)(x),
        iy = (int)(y);

        x  = x - ix;
        y  = y - iy;

    float
        fx  = fade(x),
        fy  = fade(y);

        ix &= 255;
        iy &= 255;

    // here is where i get the index to look up in the list of 
    // different gradients.
    // hashTable is my array of 0-255 in random order
    int
        g00 = hashTable[ix +     hashTable[iy    ]],
        g10 = hashTable[ix + 1 + hashTable[iy    ]],
        g01 = hashTable[ix +     hashTable[iy + 1]],
        g11 = hashTable[ix + 1 + hashTable[iy + 1]];

    // this takes the dot product to find the values to interpolate between
    float
        n00 = dot2D(g00 & 7, x, y),
        n10 = dot2D(g10 & 7, x, y),
        n01 = dot2D(g01 & 7, x, y),
        n11 = dot2D(g11 & 7, x, y);

    // lerp() is just normal linear interpolation
    float
        y1 = lerp(fx, n00, n10),
        y2 = lerp(fx, n01, n11);
    return
        lerp(fy, y1, y2);
}
share|improve this question
    
Since you suspect that hashTable might not be distributed randomly, it would help if you posted the code where you generate it. If that's the case, this article might be useful. – Groo Dec 28 '11 at 17:52
    
the hash table is actually doubled in length to 512 to avoid having to wrap the index to fit in the 0-255 range. Creating it is simple and the same as with 3D. for (int i = 0; i < 512; i++) hashTable[i] = ran.Next(256); The problem might be that two lookups into this table isn't enough to create the full randomness. In 3D there are 3 lookups into the table, but it seems like 2D would be done the exact same way. You index into it with the x value and the y value of your point. – Frobot Dec 28 '11 at 18:22
    
I solved the 2nd problem where the noise clings to the top left corner. The same thing actually happens in 3D if the area you are using starts at (0, 0, 0) What I did to fix this is to add some on to the coordinates you pass into the noise function, for example - Noise2D((x + 1000) * frequency, (y + 1000) * frequency); Basically noise around (0, 0) can't get expanded correctly so it just repeats itself. – Frobot Dec 28 '11 at 19:55
    
Answer updated with 2D version. – David Lively Dec 29 '11 at 19:20
up vote 5 down vote accepted

I had to change this:

            n00 = dot2D(g00 & 7, x, y),
            n10 = dot2D(g10 & 7, x, y),
            n01 = dot2D(g01 & 7, x, y),
            n11 = dot2D(g11 & 7, x, y);

to this:

            n00 = dot2D(g00 & 7, x    , y    ),
            n10 = dot2D(g10 & 7, x - 1, y    ),
            n01 = dot2D(g01 & 7, x    , y - 1),
            n11 = dot2D(g11 & 7, x - 1, y - 1);

Basically just subtracting 1 from the x and y where needed.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 I'll file this one under "D'oh!" on my end. Thanks for coming back with the solution. – David Lively Jan 2 '12 at 22:05

I'm in a bit of a rush, but this might be helpful. I adapted Perlin's reference implementation to C#. For 2D, just use the 3D Noise() function with a fixed z parameter. (public static float Noise(float x, float y, float z) towards the end of the class.)

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using Microsoft.Xna.Framework;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace GoEngine.Content.Entities
{
    public class NoiseMaker
    {
        /// adapted from http://cs.nyu.edu/~perlin/noise/
        // JAVA REFERENCE IMPLEMENTATION OF IMPROVED NOISE - COPYRIGHT 2002 KEN PERLIN.

        private static int[] p = new int[512];
        private static int[] permutation = { 151,160,137,91,90,15,
               131,13,201,95,96,53,194,233,7,225,140,36,103,30,69,142,8,99,37,240,21,10,23,
               190, 6,148,247,120,234,75,0,26,197,62,94,252,219,203,117,35,11,32,57,177,33,
               88,237,149,56,87,174,20,125,136,171,168, 68,175,74,165,71,134,139,48,27,166,
               77,146,158,231,83,111,229,122,60,211,133,230,220,105,92,41,55,46,245,40,244,
               102,143,54, 65,25,63,161, 1,216,80,73,209,76,132,187,208, 89,18,169,200,196,
               135,130,116,188,159,86,164,100,109,198,173,186, 3,64,52,217,226,250,124,123,
               5,202,38,147,118,126,255,82,85,212,207,206,59,227,47,16,58,17,182,189,28,42,
               223,183,170,213,119,248,152, 2,44,154,163, 70,221,153,101,155,167, 43,172,9,
               129,22,39,253, 19,98,108,110,79,113,224,232,178,185, 112,104,218,246,97,228,
               251,34,242,193,238,210,144,12,191,179,162,241, 81,51,145,235,249,14,239,107,
               49,192,214, 31,181,199,106,157,184, 84,204,176,115,121,50,45,127, 4,150,254,
               138,236,205,93,222,114,67,29,24,72,243,141,128,195,78,66,215,61,156,180
               };

        static NoiseMaker()
        {
            CalculateP();
        }

        private static int _octaves;
        private static int _halfLength = 256;

        public static void SetOctaves(int octaves)
        {
            _octaves = octaves;

            var len = (int)Math.Pow(2, octaves);

            permutation = new int[len];

            Reseed();
        }

        private static void CalculateP()
        {
            p = new int[permutation.Length * 2];
            _halfLength = permutation.Length;

            for (int i = 0; i < permutation.Length; i++)
                p[permutation.Length + i] = p[i] = permutation[i];
        }

        public static void Reseed()
        {
            var random = new Random();
            var perm = Enumerable.Range(0, permutation.Length).ToArray();

            for (var i = 0; i < perm.Length; i++)
            {
                var swapIndex = random.Next(perm.Length);

                var t = perm[i];

                perm[i] = perm[swapIndex];

                perm[swapIndex] = t;
            }

            permutation = perm;

            CalculateP();

        }

        public static float Noise(Vector3 position, int octaves, ref float min, ref float max)
        {
            return Noise(position.X, position.Y, position.Z, octaves, ref min, ref max);
        }

        public static float Noise(float x, float y, float z, int octaves, ref float min, ref float max)
        {

            var perlin = 0f;
            var octave = 1;

            for (var i = 0; i < octaves; i++)
            {
                var noise = Noise(x * octave, y * octave, z * octave);

                perlin += noise / octave;

                octave *= 2;
            }

            perlin = Math.Abs((float)Math.Pow(perlin,2));
            max = Math.Max(perlin, max);
            min = Math.Min(perlin, min);

            //perlin = 1f - 2 * perlin;

            return perlin;
        }

        public static float Noise(float x, float y, float z)
        {
            int X = (int)Math.Floor(x) % _halfLength;
            int Y = (int)Math.Floor(y) % _halfLength;
            int Z = (int)Math.Floor(z) % _halfLength;

            if (X < 0)
                X += _halfLength;

            if (Y < 0)
                Y += _halfLength;

            if (Z < 0)
                Z += _halfLength;

            x -= (int)Math.Floor(x);
            y -= (int)Math.Floor(y);
            z -= (int)Math.Floor(z);

            var u = Fade(x);
            var v = Fade(y);
            var w = Fade(z);

            int A = p[X] + Y, AA = p[A] + Z, AB = p[A + 1] + Z,      // HASH COORDINATES OF
                B = p[X + 1] + Y, BA = p[B] + Z, BB = p[B + 1] + Z;      // THE 8 CUBE CORNERS,


            return MathHelper.Lerp(
                    MathHelper.Lerp(
                         MathHelper.Lerp(
                            Grad(p[AA], x, y, z) // AND ADD
                            ,
                            Grad(p[BA], x - 1, y, z) // BLENDED
                            ,
                            u
                            )
                        ,
                        MathHelper.Lerp(
                            Grad(p[AB], x, y - 1, z)  // RESULTS
                            ,
                            Grad(p[BB], x - 1, y - 1, z)
                            ,
                            u
                            )
                        ,
                        v
                    )
                    ,
                    MathHelper.Lerp(
                        MathHelper.Lerp(
                            Grad(p[AA + 1], x, y, z - 1) // CORNERS
                            ,
                            Grad(p[BA + 1], x - 1, y, z - 1) // OF CUBE
                            ,
                            u
                            )
                        ,
                        MathHelper.Lerp(
                            Grad(p[AB + 1], x, y - 1, z - 1)
                            ,
                            Grad(p[BB + 1], x - 1, y - 1, z - 1)
                            ,
                            u
                            )
                        ,
                        v
                    )
                    ,
                    w
                );

        }

        static float Fade(float t) { return t * t * t * (t * (t * 6 - 15) + 10); }

        static float Grad(int hash, float x, float y, float z)
        {
            int h = hash & 15;                      // CONVERT LO 4 BITS OF HASH CODE

            float u = h < 8 ? x : y,                 // INTO 12 GRADIENT DIRECTIONS.
                   v = h < 4 ? y : h == 12 || h == 14 ? x : z;

            return ((h & 1) == 0 ? u : -u) + ((h & 2) == 0 ? v : -v);
        }

    }
}

Update

Okay, I managed to create a working 2D version. Here's the class:

/// implements improved Perlin noise in 2D. 
/// Transcribed from http://www.siafoo.net/snippet/144?nolinenos#perlin2003
/// </summary>
public static class Noise2d
{
    private static Random _random = new Random();
    private static int[] _permutation;

    private static Vector2[] _gradients;

    static Noise2d()
    {
        CalculatePermutation(out _permutation);
        CalculateGradients(out _gradients);
    }

    private static void CalculatePermutation(out int[] p)
    {
        p = Enumerable.Range(0, 256).ToArray();

        /// shuffle the array
        for (var i = 0; i < p.Length; i++)
        {
            var source = _random.Next(p.Length);

            var t = p[i];
            p[i] = p[source];
            p[source] = t;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// generate a new permutation.
    /// </summary>
    public static void Reseed()
    {
        CalculatePermutation(out _permutation);
    }

    private static void CalculateGradients(out Vector2[] grad)
    {
        grad = new Vector2[256];

        for (var i = 0; i < grad.Length; i++)
        {
            Vector2 gradient;

            do
            {
                gradient = new Vector2((float)(_random.NextDouble() * 2 - 1), (float)(_random.NextDouble() * 2 - 1));
            }
            while (gradient.LengthSquared() >= 1);

            gradient.Normalize();

            grad[i] = gradient;
        }

    }

    private static float Drop(float t)
    {
        t = Math.Abs(t);
        return 1f - t * t * t * (t * (t * 6 - 15) + 10);
    }

    private static float Q(float u, float v)
    {
        return Drop(u) * Drop(v);
    }

    public static float Noise(float x, float y)
    {
        var cell = new Vector2((float)Math.Floor(x), (float)Math.Floor(y));

        var total = 0f;

        var corners = new[] { new Vector2(0, 0), new Vector2(0, 1), new Vector2(1, 0), new Vector2(1, 1) };

        foreach (var n in corners)
        {
            var ij = cell + n;
            var uv = new Vector2(x - ij.X, y - ij.Y);

            var index = _permutation[(int)ij.X % _permutation.Length];
            index = _permutation[(index + (int)ij.Y) % _permutation.Length];

            var grad = _gradients[index % _gradients.Length];

            total += Q(uv.X, uv.Y) * Vector2.Dot(grad, uv);
        }

        return Math.Max(Math.Min(total, 1f), -1f);
    }

}

Call it like this:

private void GenerateNoiseMap(int width, int height, ref Texture2D noiseTexture, int octaves)
    {
        var data = new float[width * height];

        /// track min and max noise value. Used to normalize the result to the 0 to 1.0 range.
        var min = float.MaxValue;
        var max = float.MinValue;

        /// rebuild the permutation table to get a different noise pattern. 
        /// Leave this out if you want to play with changing the number of octaves while 
        /// maintaining the same overall pattern.
        Noise2d.Reseed();

        var frequency = 0.5f;
        var amplitude = 1f;
        var persistence = 0.25f;

        for (var octave = 0; octave < octaves; octave++)
        {
            /// parallel loop - easy and fast.
            Parallel.For(0
                , width * height
                , (offset) =>
                {
                    var i = offset % width;
                    var j = offset / width;
                    var noise = Noise2d.Noise(i*frequency*1f/width, j*frequency*1f/height);
                    noise = data[j * width + i] += noise * amplitude;

                    min = Math.Min(min, noise);
                    max = Math.Max(max, noise);

                }
            );

            frequency *= 2;
            amplitude /= 2;
        }


        if (noiseTexture != null && (noiseTexture.Width != width || noiseTexture.Height != height))
        {
            noiseTexture.Dispose();
            noiseTexture = null;
        }
        if (noiseTexture==null)
        {
            noiseTexture = new Texture2D(Device, width, height, false, SurfaceFormat.Color);
        }

        var colors = data.Select(
            (f) =>
            {
                var norm = (f - min) / (max - min);
                return new Color(norm, norm, norm, 1);
            }
        ).ToArray();

        noiseTexture.SetData(colors);
    }

Note that I've used a couple of XNA structures (Vector2 and Texture2D), but it should be pretty clear what they do.

If you want higher frequency (more "noisy") content with fewer octaves, increase the initial frequency value that used in the octave loop.

This implementation uses "improved" Perlin noise, which should be a bit faster than the standard version. You might also have a look at Simplex noise, which is quite a bit faster at higher dimensions.

share|improve this answer
    
This works great and I believe that's how most people do 2D noise, but it takes the same time as 3D noise. My goal here is to make a specifically 2D function which would be considerably faster – Frobot Dec 28 '11 at 18:15
    
@Frobot I've got a 2D version laying around somewhere. I'll see if I can dig it up. – David Lively Dec 28 '11 at 18:17
    
That would be appreciated – Frobot Dec 29 '11 at 3:12
    
Excellent thanks for the post. I'll have a good look at it as soon as I can and see if I can find where mine goes wrong based off this one, and if not I might just write a new one using this type of implementation. – Frobot Dec 29 '11 at 21:26
    
@Frobot glad to help. Could you accept my answer (assuming it was helpful), or is there something I missed? – David Lively Dec 29 '11 at 22:52

If you plug in a zero value for z into your 3D equation and simply follow the math through, removing terms, you'll see that you end up with a simpler equation in the end.

Your implementation looks kind of different to the one I'm using though.

Here's a comparison of a 3D and 2D function I'm using (in JavaScript):

noise3d: function(x, y, z)
{
    // Find unit cube that contains point.
    var X = Math.floor(x) & 255,
        Y = Math.floor(y) & 255,
        Z = Math.floor(z) & 255;
    // Find relative x,y,z of point in cube.
    x -= Math.floor(x);
    y -= Math.floor(y);
    z -= Math.floor(z);
    // Compute fade curves for each of x,y,z.
    var u = fade(x),
        v = fade(y),
        w = fade(z);
    // Hash coordinates of the corners.
    var A = p[X    ] + Y, AA = p[A] + Z, AB = p[A + 1] + Z,
        B = p[X + 1] + Y, BA = p[B] + Z, BB = p[B + 1] + Z;

    // Add blended results from 8 corners of cube.
    return scale(
        lerp(
            w,
            lerp(
                v,
                lerp(
                    u,
                    grad(p[AA], x, y, z),
                    grad(p[BA], x - 1, y, z)
                ),
                lerp(
                    u,
                    grad(p[AB], x, y - 1, z),
                    grad(p[BB], x - 1, y - 1, z)
                )
            ),
            lerp(
                v,
                lerp(
                    u,
                    grad(p[AA + 1], x, y, z - 1),
                    grad(p[BA + 1], x - 1, y, z - 1)
                ),
                lerp(
                    u,
                    grad(p[AB + 1], x, y - 1, z - 1),
                    grad(p[BB + 1], x - 1, y - 1, z - 1)
                )
            )
        )
    );
}

The 2D version involves fewer computations.

noise2d: function(x, y)
{
    // Find unit square that contains point.
    var X = Math.floor(x) & 255,
        Y = Math.floor(y) & 255;
    // Find relative x,y of point in square.
    x -= Math.floor(x);
    y -= Math.floor(y);
    // Compute fade curves for each of x,y.
    var u = fade(x),
        v = fade(y);
    // Hash coordinates of the corners.
    var A = p[X    ] + Y, AA = p[A], AB = p[A + 1],
        B = p[X + 1] + Y, BA = p[B], BB = p[B + 1];

    // Add blended results from the corners.
    return scale(
            lerp(
                v,
                lerp(
                    u,
                    grad(p[AA], x, y, 0),
                    grad(p[BA], x - 1, y, 0)
                ),
                lerp(
                    u,
                    grad(p[AB], x, y - 1, 0),
                    grad(p[BB], x - 1, y - 1, 0)
                )
            )
    );
}
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