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Say I have the following record:

data Rec = Rec {
   field1 :: Int,
   field2 :: Int
}

How do I write the function:

changeField :: Rec -> String -> Int -> Rec
changeField rec fieldName value 

such that I can pass in the strings "field1" or "field2" into the fieldName argument and have it update the associated field? I understand Data.Data and Data.Typeable are what to use here but I can't figure these two packages out.


An example of a library I've seen do this is cmdArgs. Below is an excerpt from a blog posting on how to use this library:

{-# LANGUAGE DeriveDataTypeable #-}
import System.Console.CmdArgs

data Guess = Guess {min :: Int, max :: Int, limit :: Maybe Int} deriving (Data,Typeable,Show)

main = do
    x <- cmdArgs $ Guess 1 100 Nothing
    print x

Now we have a simple command line parser. Some sample interactions are:

$ guess --min=10
NumberGuess {min = 10, max = 100, limit = Nothing}
share|improve this question
2  
You probably don't want to do this. Have you heard about lenses? I think the only way to achieve this would be a hack involving pairing up field names with their argument indices and using gmapQi or similar. (You'd need to add deriving (Typeable, Data) to your record declaration for this to have any hope of working; it can't be done for arbitrary types.) –  ehird Dec 28 '11 at 18:54
    
I do want to do this. I'd like to create a library where the user can supply a record, and the library can populate the record by parsing some text. The text will contain references to field in the record that I want to set. –  Ana Dec 28 '11 at 19:27
1  
Bad choice of example, I'm afraid; cmdargs' implicit mode is one of the most reviled Haskell libraries for its impurity :) Still, if you do want to accomplish this, then I still suggest using Template Haskell to generate the recMap; it's more flexible and less magical. –  ehird Dec 28 '11 at 19:39
1  
This kind of goes agains the Haskell mentality of compile time safety. You should consider using a less dynamic solution –  hugomg Dec 28 '11 at 19:43
1  
@Ana: Certainly, but a full answer to a question like this might well entail pointing out that there is likely to be a much better way of achieving the same goal; if someone asked "How can I use unsafeCoerce to convert between integral types in Haskell?", it would be remiss not to point out that you should use fromIntegral instead; thus my comments. –  ehird Dec 28 '11 at 21:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

OK, here's a solution that doesn't use template haskell, or require you to manage the field map manually.

I implemented a more general modifyField which accepts a mutator function, and implemented setField (nee changeField) using it with const value.

The signature of modifyField and setField is generic in both the record and mutator/value type; however, in order to avoid Num ambiguity, the numeric constants in the invocation example have to be given explicit :: Int signatures.

I also changed the parameter order so rec comes last, allowing a chain of modifyField/setField to be created by normal function composition (see the last invocation example).

modifyField is built on top of the primitive gmapTi, which is a 'missing' function from Data.Data. It is a cross between gmapT and gmapQi.

{-# LANGUAGE DeriveDataTypeable #-}
{-# LANGUAGE RankNTypes #-}

import Data.Typeable (Typeable, typeOf)
import Data.Data (Data, gfoldl, gmapQi, ConstrRep(AlgConstr),
                  toConstr, constrRep, constrFields)
import Data.Generics (extT, extQ)
import Data.List (elemIndex)
import Control.Arrow ((&&&))

data Rec = Rec {
    field1 :: Int,
    field2 :: String
} deriving(Show, Data, Typeable)

main = do
  let r = Rec { field1 = 1, field2 = "hello" }
  print r
  let r' = setField "field1" (10 :: Int) r
  print r'
  let r'' = setField "field2" "world" r'
  print r''
  print . modifyField "field1" (succ :: Int -> Int) . setField "field2" "there" $ r
  print (getField "field2" r' :: String)

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

data Ti a = Ti Int a

gmapTi :: Data a => Int -> (forall b. Data b => b -> b) -> a -> a
gmapTi i f x = case gfoldl k z x of { Ti _ a -> a }
  where
    k :: Data d => Ti (d->b) -> d -> Ti b
    k (Ti i' c) a = Ti (i'+1) (if i==i' then c (f a) else c a)
    z :: g -> Ti g
    z = Ti 0

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

fieldNames :: (Data r) => r -> [String]
fieldNames rec =
  case (constrRep &&& constrFields) $ toConstr rec of
    (AlgConstr _, fs) | not $ null fs -> fs
    otherwise                         -> error "Not a record type"

fieldIndex :: (Data r) => String -> r -> Int
fieldIndex fieldName rec =
  case fieldName `elemIndex` fieldNames rec of
    Just i  -> i
    Nothing -> error $ "No such field: " ++ fieldName

modifyField :: (Data r, Typeable v) => String -> (v -> v) -> r -> r
modifyField fieldName m rec = gmapTi i (e `extT` m) rec
  where
    i = fieldName `fieldIndex` rec
    e x = error $ "Type mismatch: " ++ fieldName ++
                             " :: " ++ (show . typeOf $ x) ++
                           ", not " ++ (show . typeOf $ m undefined)

setField :: (Data r, Typeable v) => String -> v -> r -> r
setField fieldName value = modifyField fieldName (const value)

getField :: (Data r, Typeable v) => String -> r -> v
getField fieldName rec = gmapQi i (e `extQ` id) rec
  where
    i = fieldName `fieldIndex` rec
    e x = error $ "Type mismatch: " ++ fieldName ++
                             " :: " ++ (show . typeOf $ x) ++
                           ", not " ++ (show . typeOf $ e undefined)
share|improve this answer

You can build a map from the field names to their lenses:

{-# LANGUAGE TemplateHaskell #-}
import Data.Lens
import Data.Lens.Template
import qualified Data.Map as Map

data Rec = Rec {
    _field1 :: Int,
    _field2 :: Int
} deriving(Show)

$( makeLens ''Rec )

recMap = Map.fromList [ ("field1", field1)
                      , ("field2", field2)
                      ]

changeField :: Rec -> String -> Int -> Rec
changeField rec fieldName value = set rec
    where set = (recMap Map.! fieldName) ^= value

main = do
  let r = Rec { _field1 = 1, _field2 = 2 }
  print r
  let r' = changeField r "field1" 10
  let r'' = changeField r' "field2" 20
  print r''

or without lenses:

import qualified Data.Map as Map

data Rec = Rec {
    field1 :: Int,
    field2 :: Int
} deriving(Show)

recMap = Map.fromList [ ("field1", \r v -> r { field1 = v })
                      , ("field2", \r v -> r { field2 = v })
                      ]

changeField :: Rec -> String -> Int -> Rec
changeField rec fieldName value =
    (recMap Map.! fieldName) rec value

main = do
  let r = Rec { field1 = 1, field2 = 2 }
  print r
  let r' = changeField r "field1" 10
  let r'' = changeField r' "field2" 20
  print r''
share|improve this answer
    
The recMap is precisely the item that I am avoiding. I requires me to specialize for every field, and I would like to do the mapping from string to field dynamically. –  Ana Dec 28 '11 at 19:21

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