Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here's my code:

#include <vector>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class Foo 
{
public:
    Foo()
    {
    }
    ~Foo()
    {
    }
    void Bar()
    {
        cout << "bar" << endl;
    }
};

template <class T>
void deleteVectorOfPointers( T * inVectorOfPointers )
{
    typename T::iterator i;
    for ( i = inVectorOfPointers->begin() ; i < inVectorOfPointers->end(); i++ )
    {
        delete * i;
    }
    delete inVectorOfPointers;
}

int main()
{
    //create pointer to a vector of pointers to foo
    vector<Foo*>* pMyVec = new vector<Foo*>();
    //create a pointer to foo
    Foo* pMyFoo = new Foo();
    //add new foo pointer to pMyVec
    pMyVec->push_back(pMyFoo);
    //call Bar on 0th Foo element of pMyVec
    pMyVec->at(0)->Bar();
    //attempt to delete the pointers inside the vector and the vector itself
    deleteVectorOfPointers(pMyVec);
    //call Bar on 0th Foo element of pMyVec
    pMyVec->at(0)->Bar();
    //call Bar directly from the pointer created in this scope
    pMyFoo->Bar();
    return 0;
}

I am trying to delete a pointer to a vector as well as all the pointers inside of the vector. However, Bar is still executing just fine after I try to do this...

share|improve this question
3  
Accessing an objects member after deletion is undefined behavior, that is not the way to test whether or not your code worked. –  Joe Dec 28 '11 at 18:54
    
so...object members are still accessible after the pointer to that object is deleted? –  Storm Kiernan Dec 28 '11 at 18:58
1  
It is undefined which means maybe, if nothing has overwritten the memory that was once there the data might be accessible. As stated before do not rely on undefined behavior to test your code. –  Joe Dec 28 '11 at 19:00
    
Um, don't? This is why pointers are often set to NULL after deletion (i.e. to keep code from using!) –  crashmstr Dec 28 '11 at 19:00

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It causes undefined-behavior. It means that anything can happen. This:

*reinterpret_cast<int*>(0x12345678) = 314159;

may also work... So what?

share|improve this answer

The above code works because it doesn't actually rely on the Foo instance being there. There are no instance variables used, so it never accesses that memory. Of course, that doesn't make it safe, it just means it worked in that particular instance. Take the following example:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

class Foo
{
private:
  std::string greet;    
public:
  Foo() : greet("Hello.") {}
  ~Foo() { cout << "Done." << endl; }
  void bar() { cout << greet << endl; };
};

template <class T>
void deleteVectorOfPointers(T *vector) {
  typename T::iterator i;
  for (i = vector->begin(); i < vector->end(); ++i) {
    delete *i;
  }
  delete vector;
}

int main()
{
  vector<Foo *> *myVector = new vector<Foo *>();
  Foo *testObj = new Foo();
  myVector->push_back(testObj);
  myVector->at(0)->bar();
  deleteVectorOfPointers(myVector);
  testObj->bar();
  return 0;
}

It segfaults as expected, since bar() tried to access an instance variable that isn't there anymore.

share|improve this answer
    
It may or may not segfault depending on a whole lot of stuff. That is why it is called undefined behavior. –  Loki Astari Dec 28 '11 at 19:19
    
True enough. The point is that OP's code doesn't touch the object in the vector at all. The string's stored as a constant somewhere else, and it doesn't touch any instance variables, so it's basically a raw function call functionality-wise. Therefore it's a lot more reasonable to expect it to not error, even when it would be better if it did. –  correnos Dec 29 '11 at 3:59

Calling delete on a pointer gives that associated memory back to the memory management library so that it can re-use it.

The pointer still has its original value, but it points at memory that no longer belongs to you.
Accessing memory that does not belong to you is undefined.

It may look like it worked (looks like means it does not crash and gives you a result (which may or may not be good)) or alternatively it may cause demons to come purring from your nose. You never know which so best not to try.

share|improve this answer

what you pointed is an undifined behaviour. the vector and object foo() are really deleted...

you just have the adress of the deleted vector written on pMyVec so it can access the data you put on it before.

share|improve this answer

It is worth to consider a ptr_vector instead of the vector to store pointers.

http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_48_0/libs/ptr_container/doc/ptr_vector.html

You should remember that accesing a deleted data not always direct to the segfault. Sometimes there is no new data in older's place. a delete didnt clear a memory space.

a sample memory space:

[x_][y][Z]

after delete Z:

[x_][y][Z]

that Z can be valid for a while but it is a undefined bahavior, because Z is only a garbage now.

share|improve this answer

This CAN work properly just because your function Foo::Bar really never accesses object *this.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.