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I've recently started using new C++11 features like lambda expressions to make my code easier to read.

In this example, I want to generate a vector of numbers [0 to n] sorted randomly. I have some code similar to the following

    #include <vector>
    #include <algorithm>
    #include <iterator>
    using namespace std;
    void _generateRandomIndices(vector<unsigned int> & indices,
                const unsigned int & n) {
        indices.clear();
        unsigned int i = 0;
        generate_n(back_inserter(indices), n , [&i] ()-> unsigned int{ 
                                                              return i++;
                                                                     } );
        random_shuffle(indices.begin(), indices.end());
    } 

However, using g++ 4.6 on windows(with the -std=c++0x flag) threw me the following error:

no matching function for call to 'generate_n(std::back_insert_iterator<std::vector<unsigned int> >, const unsigned int&, _generateRandomIndices(std::vector<unsigned int>&, const unsigned int&)::<lambda()>)'

What is the right way to use a lambda expression in this case ?

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2  
Not an answer to your question, but in C++11 you can use std::iota instead. And your code compiles fine for me (mingw32 4.6.1). –  jrok Dec 28 '11 at 19:40
1  
I've been out of the C++ loop for a while, so a guess: could it be the const n not matching the function signature of generate_n? Which brings me to a question I had about the code: why take a const reference to an unsigned int, and not just an unsigned int? It's a simple type, so the copy shouldn't cost more than passing by reference, and it's just as safe. –  JoeFish Dec 28 '11 at 19:41
    
Note that passing by reference to effectively return a new value is not idiomatic in C++11 -- move semantics will make returning by value efficient. –  ildjarn Dec 28 '11 at 20:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Sounds like you are missing an #include <algorithm>, since GCC 4.5.1 aswell as MSVC10 compile the following code without error:

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
using namespace std;

void _generateRandomIndices(vector<unsigned int> & indices,
        const unsigned int & n) {
    indices.clear();
    unsigned int i = 0;
    generate_n(back_inserter(indices), n , [&i] ()-> unsigned int{ 
                                                          return i++;
                                                                 } );
    random_shuffle(indices.begin(), indices.end());
}

int main(){
}
share|improve this answer
    
Actually i did included all those headers, i putted just the necessary code –  sohaibafifi Dec 28 '11 at 19:32
    
@sohaibafifi: If you indeed included everything, then your stdlib may be broken. Either you got an include path to the C++03 stdlib, or something else is wrong. Which GCC port for Windows do you use? –  Xeo Dec 28 '11 at 19:40
    
the mingw32 one –  sohaibafifi Dec 28 '11 at 19:41
    
@sohaibafifi: Then double-check your include path and look into the <algorithm> header found there. It sounds very much like your stdlib and/or stdlib path are broken. –  Xeo Dec 28 '11 at 19:44
1  
@sohaibafifi : I've never had anything but trouble with mainline MinGW. I recommend trying TDM-GCC instead. –  ildjarn Dec 28 '11 at 19:51

You should add this compiller option -std=c++0x

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3  
Without that compiler option, GCC would choke on the lambda, not the generate_n algorithm. –  Xeo Dec 28 '11 at 19:30
    
i do, despite it is enabled by default in g++ 4.6 –  sohaibafifi Dec 28 '11 at 19:33
    
gcc.gnu.org/gcc-4.6/cxx0x_status.html GCC provides experimental support for the upcoming ISO C++ standard, C++0x. This support can be enabled with the -std=c++0x or -std=gnu++0x compiler options. On my Gcc 4.5 this code compiles with this option –  Andrew Dec 28 '11 at 19:39

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