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I am trying to implement a 7-segment counter using VHDL.

The counter starts from 0 and increments an integer value to a max of 9999.

The value is passed to a bloc that is supposed to "split" the number into digits so that i can display them on the 7-segment which are multiplexed...

I have already done this on a PIC using many methods such as Interrupts... but now that i am trying to do this on a FPGA (Xilinx Spartan 3E Starter Board to be exact) i noticed while implementing the code i've wrote that i can't use neither division nor modulus because they cannot be implemented...

Edit: I know i could just map the values 0..9999 each alone but that is far far fetched.

Surely there is another way, but i can't think of it.

Any hint on a workaround would be very appreciated!

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Is your number stored as binary or decimal? –  Gabe Dec 28 '11 at 19:44
    
its in decimal, but if its best to have it in binary i can easily convert it –  Dany Khalife Dec 28 '11 at 19:46
    
Well, if your number is in decimal, just extract the bits containing each digit and send them to your display multiplexor. The LSD is num[3:0], the MSD is num[15:12], etc. –  Gabe Dec 28 '11 at 20:00
    
cool i didn't know i could do that, im still missing something tho, i tried this D0 <= count[3:0]; and i get ';' expected error on that line (was compiling before) EDIT: D0 is a 4 bit unsigned out signal –  Dany Khalife Dec 28 '11 at 20:10
    
nevermind, i forgot the syntax is : D0 <= count(3 downto 0); will test and get back here :) –  Dany Khalife Dec 28 '11 at 20:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, if your number is in decimal, just extract the bits containing each digit and send them to your display multiplexor. The LSD is num[3:0], the MSD is num[15:12], etc.

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