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Below is my query

SELECT cover.id              AS cID,
       cover.title           AS cTitle,
       cover.slug            AS cSlug,
       cover.image           AS cImage,
       cover.timestamp       AS cTimestamp,
       category.name         AS catName,
       category.slug         AS catSlug,
       GROUP_CONCAT(tag.tag) AS tags
FROM   cover
       JOIN category
         ON cover.category_id = category.id
       LEFT OUTER JOIN cover_tag
         ON cover_tag.cover_id = cover.id
       LEFT OUTER JOIN tag
         ON tag.id = cover_tag.tag_id
GROUP  BY cover.title
LIMIT  0, 30  

This will return all covers and all tags for each cover. Now, what if I want to return only rows that have a tag 'cars' BUT still return all tags the cover has?

I'm trying to find help on Google but have no idea what I am searching for.

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3 Answers

If I understood what you're asking,

SELECT cover.id              AS cID,
       cover.title           AS cTitle,
       cover.slug            AS cSlug,
       cover.image           AS cImage,
       cover.timestamp       AS cTimestamp,
       category.name         AS catName,
       category.slug         AS catSlug,
       GROUP_CONCAT(tag.tag) AS tags
FROM   cover
       JOIN category
         ON cover.category_id = category.id
       JOIN cover_tag
         ON cover_tag.cover_id = cover.id
       LEFT OUTER JOIN tag
         ON tag.id = cover_tag.tag_id
       JOIN tag T2
         ON T2.id = cover_tag.tag_id AND T2.tag = 'cars'
GROUP  BY cover.title
LIMIT  0, 30  

The last join should ensure that the cover_tag has a tag called 'cars'.

EDIT Hm, better explanation... A picture? Over 9000 words saved, they say. The matched structure for a cover with a tag set of "photos, cars, great" would be:

                     [cover] ---- [category]
                        |
                        |
                        |
[tag:photos] ----/ [cover_tag] ---- [T2:cars]
[tag:cars]   ---/
[tag:great]  --/

For a cover with a tag set of "clown, shoes, balloon, kids_love_it", T2 would not match, thus cover_tag would not match, thus cover would not match.

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The tags result only returns the tag 'cars'. I need it to return all the tags each Cover has, but only return results that include the tag 'cars' –  GV1 Dec 28 '11 at 20:20
    
Yeah, read again. The table tag is joined twice, one of those under an alias. It is T2 row which needs to be 'cars', not the tag we're using for results. This restricts cover_tag, and then tag table picks up all the tags contained in that cover_tag. –  Amadan Dec 28 '11 at 20:23
2  
Also, what I imagine when I see "catslug"... –  Amadan Dec 28 '11 at 20:25
    
Still a little confused. I understand what you mean, but not sure where to go from here. I need to find a good book that can help with these sorts of SQL joins. Things start to get tricky and I'm easily lost in SQL. –  GV1 Dec 28 '11 at 20:27
    
I put in a diagram - maybe clearer now? –  Amadan Dec 28 '11 at 20:36
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Does adding this do the job?

HAVING INSTR(CONCAT(',',GROUP_CONCAT(tag.tag),',') , ',Car,') > 0 
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It will work, but screws indexes so bad they need therapy. –  Amadan Dec 28 '11 at 20:26
    
that's a fun way to solve the problem, but i can't imagine this being scalable. perhaps that isn't a concern for the op. +1 for creativity though. –  nathan gonzalez Dec 28 '11 at 20:27
    
Yep probably better to have two joins on the tag table. –  Martin Smith Dec 28 '11 at 20:30
    
Depends on the scale, obviously. If it's a toy project with 100 lines, this solution is definitely easier to understand. But if there's even a glimmer of possibility it would get big... –  Amadan Dec 28 '11 at 20:40
    
Yes, this project will defiantly expand over time, which is why I didn't choose this solution. I also like to understand and learn about an problem I'm having trouble understand. But thanks anyway Martin. –  GV1 Dec 28 '11 at 20:51
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Think of it as a 2-query problem, resulting in separate sets of data. Then we find the intersection of those 2 sets.

You've already got the 1st set: "all tags for (all) covers". The second set "Covers with tag-value 'cars'" would be the same as your original query w/ a WHERE clause added, filtering for the tag-value "cars".

Now, to combine the two. The technique highlights:

+The second query goes in a "where exists" (or "not exists" as desired)

+The second query filters on the specific value

+The primary key from each instance of the "central" table is part of that filter

SELECT c1.id AS cID, c1.title AS cTitle, c1.slug AS cSlug, c1.image AS cImage, c1.timestamp AS cTimestamp, cat1.name AS catName, cat1.slug AS catSlug,       GROUP_CONCAT( t1.tag ) AS tags
FROM cover c1
JOIN category cat1 ON c1.category_id = cat1.id
LEFT OUTER JOIN cover_tag ct1 ON ct1.cover_id = c1.id
LEFT OUTER JOIN tag t1 ON t1.id = ct1.tag_id
WHERE
    EXISTS (
        SELECT *    -- what we select is irrelevant. We only care that the row exists
        FROM cover c2
        JOIN category cat2 ON c2.category_id = cat2.id
        LEFT OUTER JOIN cover_tag ct2 ON ct2.cover_id = c2.id
        LEFT OUTER JOIN tag t2 ON t2.id = ct2.tag_id
        WHERE
            t2.value = "cars"
            and c1.id = c2.id
    )
GROUP BY c1.title
LIMIT 0 , 30
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