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We have a table in our database that various systems report into with timestamp and values. This table is called the data table. (I know, I didn't name it.)

So I'm given the task of going through and find the time differences between the reports for a particular system.

Not knowing how else to go about this, I created a temporary table, such:

CREATE TABLE #Readings(
  id            INT IDENTITY(1,1) PRIMARY KEY NOT NULL,
  timestamp     DATETIME
)

Then I insert all of the readings for a particular system:

INSERT INTO #Readings (timestamp)
SELECT ReadingAt
FROM data 
WHERE SenId = 3
ORDER BY ReadingAt

Finally, I run my query:

select  r1.id, r1.timestamp, datediff(second, r1.timestamp, (select r2.timestamp 
from #Readings r2 where r2.id = (r1.id - 1)))
from    #Readings r1
where id > 1

but this returned:

101 2011-07-14 04:44:05.443 <null>
102 2011-07-14 04:46:05.443 -120
103 2011-07-14 04:48:05.447 -120
104 2011-07-14 04:50:05.447 -120
105 2011-07-14 04:52:05.447 -120
106 2011-07-14 04:54:05.45  -120
107 2011-07-14 04:56:05.45  -120
108 2011-07-14 04:58:05.45  -120
109 2011-07-14 05:00:05.45  -120
110 2011-07-14 05:02:05.453 -120

So I did the following:

select  r1.id, r1.timestamp, (select r2.timestamp from #Readings r2 where r2.id = (r1.id - 1))
from    #Readings r1
where id > 1

which returned the correct dates.

So, I'm wondering, how can I do this?

Thanks.

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closed as too localized by casperOne Dec 30 '11 at 7:07

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1  
The results you've got look reasonable to me - if you want positive values, just change the order of the second and third operands. What did you expect to get? –  Jon Skeet Dec 28 '11 at 20:39
    
The results are always 120 seconds regardless of the time range. That's why they're not reasonable. –  The Thom Dec 28 '11 at 20:43
1  
Which is actually the right answer. Whoops. Thanks for pointing it out. –  The Thom Dec 28 '11 at 20:44
    
what is the actual problem - what output do you expect? you compare id to 1, but your first ID is 101... and -120 is the expected result for diff'ing dates two minute apart when you put the earlier one as first parameter –  codeling Dec 28 '11 at 20:44
    
What is the question being asked here? –  cadrell0 Dec 28 '11 at 21:04

2 Answers 2

Make it simpler on yourself, don't use subqueries!

select
   r1.id,
   r1.timestamp,
   datediff(second, r2.timestamp, r1.timestamp) as TimeBetween
from
   #Readings r1
   left join #Readings r2 on
      r1.id = r2.id+1
where
   r1.id > 1

But for what it's worth, the first query is right. Your datediff function is the time between the start time and the end time. Ergo, the start time has to be less than the end time. That's why you're getting negatives.

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I had thought of that at one point, but for some reason, didn't try it. When I tried just now, it returned: 101 2011-07-14 04:44:05.443 <null> 102 2011-07-14 04:46:05.443 -120 103 2011-07-14 04:48:05.447 -120 104 2011-07-14 04:50:05.447 -120 105 2011-07-14 04:52:05.447 -120 106 2011-07-14 04:54:05.45 -120 107 2011-07-14 04:56:05.45 -120 108 2011-07-14 04:58:05.45 -120 109 2011-07-14 05:00:05.45 -120 110 2011-07-14 05:02:05.453 -120 111 2011-07-14 05:04:05.453 -120 112 2011-07-14 05:06:05.457 -120 113 2011-07-14 05:08:05.507 -120 114 2011-07-14 05:10:05.51 -120 –  The Thom Dec 28 '11 at 20:41
    
@Thom - It is better to do it with a JOIN, but the problem is with the order of the columns on your DATEDIFF, it should be the other way around. Since every record in your example data are 2 minutes apart, the result is -120 seconds –  Lamak Dec 28 '11 at 20:43
    
Oh, and +1 to your answer –  Lamak Dec 28 '11 at 20:44
    
@Thom - Edited it to be the correct sign for you--your issue is order in the datediff function. –  Eric Dec 28 '11 at 20:45

Here is how you could do it all in one query, without any temp tables

SELECT T1.ReadingAt, T2.ReadingAt, 
       datediff(second, T2.ReadingAt, T1.ReadingAt) AS TimeBetween
FROM (SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY ReadingAt) AS RowNumber, ReadingAt
      FROM data 
      WHERE SenId = 3) t1
      INNER JOIN 
      (SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY ReadingAt) AS RowNumber, ReadingAt
       FROM data 
       WHERE SenId = 3) t2 ON T1.RowNumber = T2.RowNumber + 1
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