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I am trying to start a new thread and pass an argument to one of my methods. The argument is a List<string> and contains about 20 string items. I can pass the array fine using the following code:

List<string> strList = new List<string>();

Thread newThread = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(Class.Method));
newThread.Start(strList);

My Method is defined as:

public void Method(object strList)
{
//code
}

My question then is how can I run a foreach loop through each string that is contained in this object?

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1  
Is it a string array or a List<string>? They're not the same... –  Jon Skeet Dec 28 '11 at 20:40

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Three options:

  • Use ParameterizedThreadStart as you are, and cast within the method:

    public void Method(object strList)
    {
        List<string> list = (List<string>) strList;
        // Use list here
    }
    
  • Use an anonymous function to capture the variable in a strongly typed way, and call a strongly-typed method from the anonymous function:

    List<string> strList = new List<string>();
    ThreadStart action = () => Method(strList);
    new Thread(action).Start();
    
    ...
    
    public void Method(List<string> list)
    {
        // Use list here
    }
    
  • Use a higher-level abstraction such as the Task Parallel Library or Parallel LINQ instead; depending on what you're doing, this may make things simpler.

If you do want to start a new thread, I'd use the second approach - keep the "dirtiness" localized to the method starting a new thread. Any of these approaches will work though. Note that if you had more than one piece of information to pass to the new thread, the second approach ends up being simpler than creating a Tuple and unpacking it.

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Using an anonymous method in order to strong type like this..that's neat, had never occurred to me before! –  diggingforfire Dec 28 '11 at 20:46
1  
+1 Oh I like that second option. –  albertjan Dec 28 '11 at 20:46
1  
Perfect! I actually had figured out the first method shortly after I posted but am opting to go with option #2 and it works great. thanks! –  Ron Dec 28 '11 at 20:56
    
Just to expand on this on a little because Im curious. Is there a way to get the count using strList.Count and create a new thread for each item in the list? –  Ron Dec 28 '11 at 21:05
    
@Ron: That's where Parallel LINQ would come into play - Parallel.ForEach. –  Jon Skeet Dec 28 '11 at 21:55

You have to typecast the object to your list type like e.g. the following:

public void Method(object strList)
{
    var list = (List<string>)strList;
    foreach ( var s in list )
    {
        // Do something.
    }
}
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You will have to cast the object to it's actual type, then you can just use foreach.

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You'll have to cast it back to a list of strings like so:

public void Method(object strList)
{
    List<string> internalStringList = strList as List<string>;
    //this is a save cast the "internalStringList" variable will 
    //be null if the cast fails.
}

You can also do this:

List<string> internalStringList = (List<string>) strList;

but this could throw an InvalidCastException if strList isn't a List

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To be safe:

public void Method(object strList)
{
   var list = strList as List<string>;
   if (list != null)
    { 
       foreach(var item in list )
       {
          //code here
       }
    }
}
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Cast your object with (List<string>) and then use the iteration through it

for (int i = 0; i < list.Count; i++) // Loop through List with for
        {
            Console.WriteLine(list[i]);
        }
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He'll have to cast it first. This won't work. –  albertjan Dec 28 '11 at 20:43
    
yes. missed through the lines tat it is not casted. –  King Dec 28 '11 at 20:46
1  
You should put ticks around the List<string> cast then it'll show up as code. –  albertjan Dec 28 '11 at 20:51

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