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So for a type like:

CoolCollection<T>

you could have:

foreach (T item in coolCollection)
{
    ...
}

foreach (CoolNode node in coolCollection)
{
    ...
}

If this isn't possible, maybe like foreach2, or some other way to iterate. Often times, I would really like more than 1 way of iterating on a type.

EDIT: Sorry if it wasn't clear. Basically CoolNode is a node that makes CoolCollection. CoolNode has a property called value to return T, but I need another iterator to return only CoolNodes.

EDIT2: I can't do coolCollection.Something to iterate, because CoolNodes are connected via a property called Next, like a LinkedList. So I need to implement 2 iterators.

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So what is the question? You can't iterate through your collection more than once? –  GalacticCowboy May 14 '09 at 22:22
    
It's not clear what you mean. Are the T's and the CoolNode's different subcollections, or just different views of the same collection? For the first, you should do like J.13.L said and have methods or properties that return an appropriate Enumerable for each. For the second, you can use an appropriate cast or conversion. –  Matthew Flaschen May 14 '09 at 22:37
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Just make CoolCollection<T> explicitly implement IEnumerable<CoolNode<T>> as well as IEnumerable<T>. (I'm guessing it's really CoolNode<T>, but if not, just take the extra <T> out everywhere.)

This will let you iterate in both manners, although you'll need a cast.

To do this, you'd need something like:

class CoolCollection<T> : ICollection<T>, IEnumerable<CoolNode<T>>
{
    IEnumerator<CoolNode<T>> IEnumerable<CoolNode<T>>.GetEnumerator()
    {
        ///...Do work here...
    }

    IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        ///...Do work here...
    }
}

Using this would be like so:

foreach (T item in coolCollection)
{
    ...
}


foreach (CoolNode<T> node in (IEnumerable<CoolNode<T>>)coolCollection)
{
    ...
}

The other option would be to expose a property for the "nodes", so you could do:

foreach(var nodes in coolCollection.Nodes)
{ ... }

To implement this, you'd change things around a little bit. You'd need to make a private class that implemented the enumerator... something like:

class CoolCollection<T> : ICollection<T>
{
    private List<CoolNode<T>> nodes;

    IEnumerable<CoolNode<T>> Nodes
    {
        get 
        {
             foreach(var node in this.nodes) { yield return node; }
        }
    }
}
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Thanks Reed. Why will I need a cast? Also I edited the question to make it clear, if it helps. –  Joan Venge May 14 '09 at 22:48
    
I added an example - you'd need the cast so the compiler treats coolCollection as IEnumerable<CoolNode> instead of IEnumerable<T> in that case. I'm also guessing it's CoolNode<T>, if the nodes are part of the generic collection... –  Reed Copsey May 14 '09 at 22:58
    
At least you should mention that this is a bad practice ... –  Sam Saffron May 14 '09 at 23:00
2  
@Reed @Joan, I see no reason to go about creating the NodeEnumerator private class (unless its for a reuse scenario in which case it would not be a private class), you can yield return directly from you Nodes IEnumerable. –  Sam Saffron May 15 '09 at 0:03
1  
@Joan: I updated it to remove the need for the private class.. it simplifies things a fair amount. Sambo99 had a good point... The option above is a good, clean way of implementing this (now). –  Reed Copsey May 15 '09 at 0:08
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If I understand the question correctly...

You could do it similar to the some of the other collection objects do it:

for example:

foreach (int key in IDictionary.Keys)
{

}

foreach (object value in IDictionary.Values)
{

}

But I don't think there is a way to do exactly the way you have it written...

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No, you can't do that. You can not overload your default iterator.

Imagine if you could overload your default iterator.

What would this do? foreach (object o in foo) , there would be no logical way to choose the right iterator.

What you can do is have a second method named ForEach2 that iterates through your collection in a different way. Or you could explicitly implement an interface. Or you could use Linq composition for this kind of stuff.

From a class design perspective:

interface IBar {
   IEnumerator<string> GetEnumerator();
}

class Foo : IBar, IEnumerable<int> {

    // Very bad, risky code. Enumerator implementations, should 
    // line up in your class design. 
    public IEnumerator<int> GetEnumerator()
    {
        yield return 1;
        yield return 2;
        yield return 3;
        yield return 4;
    }

    IEnumerator<string> IBar.GetEnumerator()
    {
        yield return "hello";
    }

    // must be IEnumerable if you want to support foreach 
    public IEnumerable<string> AnotherIterator
    { 
        get {
           yield return "hello2";
        }
    }


    System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return this.GetEnumerator(); 
    }

}

LINQ extensions for EachPair

struct Pair<T> { 
    public T First;
    public T Second;
}

static class LinqExtension {
    public static IEnumerable<Pair<T>> EachPair<T>(this IEnumerable<T> input) {
        T first = default(T);
        bool gotFirst = false;
        foreach (var item in input)
        {
            if (!gotFirst)
            {
                first = item;
                gotFirst = true;
            }
            else {
                yield return new Pair<T>() { First = first, Second = item };
                gotFirst = false;
            }
        } 
    }
}

Test code:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var foo = new Foo(); 

        foreach (int number in foo)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(number);
        }

        // LINQ composition - a good trick where you want
        //  another way to iterate through the same data 
        foreach (var pair in foo.EachPair())
        {
            Console.WriteLine("got pair {0} {1}", pair.First, pair.Second);
        }

        // This is a bad and dangerous practice. 
        // All default enumerators should be the same, otherwise
        // people will get confused.
        foreach (string str in (IBar)foo)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(str);
        }

        // Another possible way, which can be used to iterate through
        //   a portion of your collection eg. Dictionary.Keys 
        foreach (string str in foo.AnotherIterator)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(str);
        }
    }
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Can someone tell me why this is the worse answer? –  Sam Saffron May 14 '09 at 22:58
    
In first block: IEnumerable<string> AnotherIterator should be IEnumerator<string> –  Reed Copsey May 14 '09 at 23:12
    
Also: EachPair doesn't seem to be relevant? What's its purpose here? It's enumerating and constructing pairs (element 0&1, then 1&2, 2&3, ...) Doesn't seem to match up with the other information.... –  Reed Copsey May 14 '09 at 23:14
    
@Reed, in the question @Joan mentions 'maybe like foreach2' so I demonstrated a generic way of implementing foreach2 –  Sam Saffron May 14 '09 at 23:17
    
@sambo99: I understood "foreach2" to be a second foreach, not something that iterated in pairs. Your answer makes sense now, but I'm not sure that's what she meant. ;) –  Reed Copsey May 14 '09 at 23:26
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If CoolCollection implements IEnumerable you can write:

foreach (var item in coolCollection)
{
    ...
}

or if T is CoolNode

foreach (CoolNode node in coolCollection)
{
    ...
}

If you need somehow transform each item to your type, you can use Linq Select operator:

foreach (CoolNode node in coolCollection.Select(item => ConvertToNode(item))
{
    ...
}
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Take a look at the iterindex snippet. In your class, type iterindex and hit [TAB]. It will help you implement a "Named Iterator and Indexer" pattern.

The result can by used like this:

foreach (var e in myTree.DepthFirstView) // supports iteration
{
    if (e == myTree.DepthFirstView[2]) // supports indexing
    {
        // ...
    }
}

(I wrote this snippet, but I suspect it has never been put to good use. Ever.)

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