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I would like to perform blinear interpolation using python.
Example gps point for which I want to interpolate height is:

B = 54.4786674627
L = 17.0470721369

using four adjacent points with known coordinates and height values:

n = [(54.5, 17.041667, 31.993), (54.5, 17.083333, 31.911), (54.458333, 17.041667, 31.945), (54.458333, 17.083333, 31.866)]


z01    z11

     z
z00    z10


and here's my primitive attempt:

import math
z00 = n[0][2]
z01 = n[1][2]
z10 = n[2][2]
z11 = n[3][2]
c = 0.016667 #grid spacing
x0 = 56 #latitude of origin of grid
y0 = 13 #longitude of origin of grid
i = math.floor((L-y0)/c)
j = math.floor((B-x0)/c)
t = (B - x0)/c - j
z0 = (1-t)*z00 + t*z10
z1 = (1-t)*z01 + t*z11
s = (L-y0)/c - i
z = (1-s)*z0 + s*z1


where z0 and z1

z01  z0  z11

     z
z00  z1   z10


I get 31.964 but from other software I get 31.961.
Is my script correct?
Can You provide another approach?

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2  
You've got rounding errors and you're rounding??? What happens if you remove floor? –  Ben Dec 28 '11 at 21:36
2  
What are L and B? The coordinates of the point at which you'd like to interpolate? –  machine yearning Dec 28 '11 at 21:45
    
@machine yearning that's right –  daikini Dec 28 '11 at 21:49
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5 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Here's a reusable function you can use. It includes doctests and data validation:

def bilinear_interpolation(x, y, points):
    '''Interpolate (x,y) from values associated with four points.

    The four points are a list of four triplets:  (x, y, value).
    The four points can be in any order.  They should form a rectangle.

        >>> bilinear_interpolation(12, 5.5,
        ...                        [(10, 4, 100),
        ...                         (20, 4, 200),
        ...                         (10, 6, 150),
        ...                         (20, 6, 300)])
        165.0

    '''
    # See formula at:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bilinear_interpolation

    points = sorted(points)               # order points by x, then by y
    (x1, y1, q11), (_x1, y2, q12), (x2, _y1, q21), (_x2, _y2, q22) = points

    if x1 != _x1 or x2 != _x2 or y1 != _y1 or y2 != _y2:
        raise ValueError('points do not form a rectangle')
    if not x1 <= x <= x2 or not y1 <= y <= y2:
        raise ValueError('(x, y) not within the rectangle')

    return (q11 * (x2 - x) * (y2 - y) +
            q21 * (x - x1) * (y2 - y) +
            q12 * (x2 - x) * (y - y1) +
            q22 * (x - x1) * (y - y1)
           ) / ((x2 - x1) * (y2 - y1) + 0.0)

You can run test code by adding:

if __name__ == '__main__':
    import doctest
    doctest.testmod()

Running the interpolation on your dataset produces:

>>> n = [(54.5, 17.041667, 31.993),
         (54.5, 17.083333, 31.911),
         (54.458333, 17.041667, 31.945),
         (54.458333, 17.083333, 31.866),
    ]
>>> bilinear_interpolation(54.4786674627, 17.0470721369, n)
31.95798688313631
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2  
Great solution, thanks. –  daikini Dec 28 '11 at 23:27
3  
+1 for the software engineering. –  machine yearning Dec 29 '11 at 5:02
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Not sure if this helps much, but I get a different value when doing linear interpolation using scipy:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> from scipy.interpolate import griddata
>>> n = np.array([(54.5, 17.041667, 31.993),
                  (54.5, 17.083333, 31.911),
                  (54.458333, 17.041667, 31.945),
                  (54.458333, 17.083333, 31.866)])
>>> griddata(n[:,0:2], n[:,2], [(54.4786674627, 17.0470721369)], method='linear')
array([ 31.95817681])
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Thank You for Your answer. –  daikini Dec 28 '11 at 23:29
    
griddata interpolates linearly in a simplex (triangle) rather than bilinearly in a rectangle; that means it is doing triangulation (Delaunay?) first. –  sastanin Mar 6 '13 at 21:42
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You can also refer to the interp function in matplotlib.

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I think the point of doing a floor function is that usually you're looking to interpolate a value whose coordinate lies between two discrete coordinates. However you seem to have the actual real coordinate values of the closest points already, which makes it simple math.

z00 = n[0][2]
z01 = n[1][2]
z10 = n[2][2]
z11 = n[3][2]

# Let's assume L is your x-coordinate and B is the Y-coordinate

dx = n[2][0] - n[0][0] # The x-gap between your sample points
dy = n[1][1] - n[0][1] # The Y-gap between your sample points

dx1 = (L - n[0][0]) / dx # How close is your point to the left?
dx2 = 1 - dx1              # How close is your point to the right?
dy1 = (B - n[0][1]) / dy # How close is your point to the bottom?
dy2 = 1 - dy1              # How close is your point to the top?

left = (z00 * dy1) + (z01 * dy2)   # First interpolate along the y-axis
right = (z10 * dy1) + (z11 * dy2)

z = (left * dx1) + (right * dx2)   # Then along the x-axis

There might be a bit of erroneous logic in translating from your example, but the gist of it is you can weight each point based on how much closer it is to the interpolation goal point than its other neighbors.

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Aren't you forgetting to divide left, right and z by dy1+dy2, dy1+dy2 and dx1+dx2 respectfully? –  ovgolovin Dec 28 '11 at 22:12
    
I'm not sure why you'd do that. dx1, dx2, dy1, and dy2 are all normalized to supplementary values between 0 and 1 (so dy1+dy2 always equals to 1) since dx is the total distance between the left neighbor and the right neighbor, and similarly for dy. –  machine yearning Dec 28 '11 at 22:19
    
Oh, sorry. They are already normalized. –  ovgolovin Dec 28 '11 at 22:24
    
@machine yearning I'm not sure if it is clear that the goal is to interpolate height value for given point what is about 31 meters according to heights of adjacent points 31.993, 31.911, 31.945, 31.866. –  daikini Dec 28 '11 at 23:06
    
@machine yearning Thanks for Your answer. –  daikini Dec 29 '11 at 0:16
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Inspired from here, I came up with the following snippet. The API is optimized for reusing a lot of times the same table:

from bisect import bisect_left

class BilinearInterpolation(object):
    """ Bilinear interpolation. """
    def __init__(self, x_index, y_index, values):
        self.x_index = x_index
        self.y_index = y_index
        self.values = values

    def __call__(self, x, y):
        # local lookups
        x_index, y_index, values = self.x_index, self.y_index, self.values

        i = bisect_left(x_index, x) - 1
        j = bisect_left(y_index, y) - 1

        x1, x2 = x_index[i:i + 2]
        y1, y2 = y_index[j:j + 2]
        z11, z12 = values[j][i:i + 2]
        z21, z22 = values[j + 1][i:i + 2]

        return (z11 * (x2 - x) * (y2 - y) +
                z21 * (x - x1) * (y2 - y) +
                z12 * (x2 - x) * (y - y1) +
                z22 * (x - x1) * (y - y1)) / ((x2 - x1) * (y2 - y1))

You can use it like this:

table = BilinearInterpolation(
    x_index=(54.458333, 54.5), 
    y_index=(17.041667, 17.083333), 
    values=((31.945, 31.866), (31.993, 31.911))
)

print(table(54.4786674627, 17.0470721369))
# 31.957986883136307

This version has no error checking and you will run into trouble if you try to use it at the boundaries of the indexes (or beyond). For the full version of the code, including error checking and optional extrapolation, look here.

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