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I'm trying to create a library of some common algorithms so that people will be able to use them easily. I created an object called Compare, which has some methods that would be useful in these algorithms.

Code for Compare:

class Compare(list):
    def __init__(self,arr):
         self.arr = arr

    def __compare(self,u,v):
        # Compares one item of a Compare
        # object to another
        if u < v:
            return 1
        if u == v:
            return 0
        if u > v:
            return -1

    def __swap(self,arr,i,j):
        # Exchanges i and j 
        temp = arr[i]
        arr[i] = arr[j]
        a[j] = temp

    def __determine(self,arr):
        # Determines if the array is sorted or not
        for i in range(0,len(array)):
            if self.__compare(arr[i], arr[i+1]) == -1:
                return False
        return True

    def __printout(self,arr):
        for i in range(0,len(array)):
            return arr[i] + '\n'

    def sorted(self):
        if self.__determine(arr):
            return True
        return False

Here's one of the algorithms that uses this class:

    def SelectionSort(array):
        try:
            array = Compare(array)
            for ix in range(0, len(array)):
                m = ix
                j = ix+1
                for j in range(0,len(array)):
                    if array.__compare(array[j], array[m]) == -1:
                         m = j
                array.__swap(arr, ix, m)
            return array
        except(TypeError) as error:
            print "Must insert array for sort to work."

The problem I'm having is that whenever I try to use this or any of the other algorithms, it returns an empty array instead of the sorted array. I'm not sure how to get the Compare object to return the sorted array.

share|improve this question
    
Can you give an example of initializing Compare and when it returns empty?? –  tylerthemiler Dec 28 '11 at 22:02
    
Here: '>>>a=[546456,0,-23,423,7,56654321,342,22,53,'d','rt'] >>> import khwarizmi >>> from khwarizmi import sort >>> sort.SelectionSort(a) []' Khwarizmi is the name of the library. –  user1120032 Dec 28 '11 at 22:06
1  
At first glance, I don't think you would be able to make this call: array.__compare() since it would be mangled (and essentially hidden) from public use. –  Manny D Dec 28 '11 at 22:09
2  
Are you doing this for homework, or as an attempt to learn how to write sorting algorithms, or what? It's horribly inefficient, un-Pythonic, and more easily written as just array.sort(). –  Daniel Roseman Dec 28 '11 at 22:16
1  
Can you use a simpler example with simpler input? You really need to reconsider what you're doing here. You wrote a class but none of the functions actually work with the internal data, just the data you pass it. Also, you typically don't (ever) want to subclass native data types unless you really know what you're doing. You're better off writing a series of helper functions. –  Manny D Dec 28 '11 at 22:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You're not returning the array, you're returning a Compare wrapped around the array. If you intend Compare to be a proxy, the wrapping is incomplete, as you don't forward the standard container operations to the proxied array. In addition, you'll need to consistently use the Compare instance. Currently, you sometimes use the Compare and other times use the original sequence object, such as every place you pass the sequence to a method. Instead, use the Compare object within its own methods.

However, that's having Compare do two things: be an algorithm collection, and be a sequence. If you keep the Compare object separate and work on the list directly, you can switch out the algorithms easily. This is the more typical approach; list.sort works this way, taking a comparator as an argument. You'll also need to fix your implementation of Compare, which uses the wrong variable name in numerous places (array, when the local variable is named arr). If you want anyone to use your library, it's going to have to be much better designed.

As further reasons not to make Compare a sequence, consider what happens when you need to change comparison methods: you end up wrapping the Compare in another, making the wrapped Compare useless.

Consider the approach used in math: an order is a relationship defined on a set, not an intrinsic part of the set, and it especially isn't a part of sequences of items from the set. This reveals another conceptual error with your original approach: it couples an ordering (which is a set relationship) with operations on sequences of elements from the set. The two should be kept separate, so that you can use different comparisons with the sequence operations.

Off-Topic

There are a number of other mistakes of various types in the code. For example, in SelectionSort you assume that type errors must be due to a non-sequence being passed as array. Comparing instances of uncomparable types (such as 0 and 'd') will also result in a type error. For another example, Compare.sorted is useless; it's of the pattern:

if test:
    return True
return False

This is logically equivalent to:

return test

which means Compare.sorted is equivalent to Compare.__determine. Make the latter the former, as sorted is a more descriptive name. "determine" is too ambiguous; it begs the question of what's being determined.

You can get more code reviews at codereview.stackexchange.com.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for linking to that. So i should just override getitem and setitem for the Compare? –  user1120032 Dec 28 '11 at 22:37
    
I'm also not the greatest programmer, so thank you for helping. –  user1120032 Dec 28 '11 at 22:40
    
Don't do that; that's a bad design. As I've already stated, don't make Compare a sequence; use the original sequence instead. –  outis Dec 28 '11 at 22:43
    
Original sequence? By the way, Compare doesn't have the algorithms in it. –  user1120032 Dec 28 '11 at 22:45
    
The original sequence would be, well, the sequence you originally create: the original array in SelectionSort. Compare does contain algorithms. For example, one tests whether a sequence is already sorted. –  outis Dec 28 '11 at 22:59

I'm pretty sure this is what is happening. When you call :

array = Compare(array)

You overwrite the reference to the original array. Array is now a reference to a Compare object. Replace array with array.arr (or name array something better) and this should work I think! :)

Remember that python is loosely typed, so that your "array" variable is just a reference to some data. In this case, you are switching it from a reference to a list to a reference to a Compare object.

Think about:

>>> x = 1
>>> x
1
>>> x = 's'
>>> x
's'

And think about what happens to the 1 ;)

share|improve this answer
1  
The list won't be collected, as the Compare instance stores a reference to it. –  outis Dec 28 '11 at 22:31
    
Ahh yes, I seem to have said both things in my answer :P Calling array.arr is what he wants though I think. –  tylerthemiler Dec 28 '11 at 22:32

Your code has many problems some of them make it to fail for example

  • in sorted you are using a maybe global arr that doesn't exist, instead of self.arr).
  • in swap you also use a[j] = temp, but a is local to the method and you do not use it for anything
  • you are using two underscores for your methods. This puts name mangling to work, So the calls in the function do not work in the way you do them. Probably you want a single underscore to indicate that this are private methods.

But the main problem is that Compare is not returnig a list. For that you need:

class Compare(list):
    def __init__(self, arr):
        list.__init__(self, arr)

then:

>>> print Compare([1,2,3,4])
[1, 2, 3, 4]

In this way you should use in your methods self instead of self.arr because your instance is a list (or an instance of a subclass of list).

So the following is your code modified to actually work. The only problem is that your sorting algorithn is wrong an it is not sorting right. But you can do from here I suppose:

class Compare(list):
    def __init__(self, arr):
        list.__init__(self, arr)

    def _compare(self, u, v):
        # Compares one item of a Compare
        # object to another
        if u < v:
            return 1
        if u == v:
            return 0
        if u > v:
            return -1

    def _swap(self, i, j):
        # Exchanges i and j 
        temp = self[i]
        self[i] = self[j]
        self[j] = temp

    def _determine(self):
        # Determines if the array is sorted or not
        for i in range(len(array)):
            if self._compare(self[i], self[i+1]) == -1:
                return False
        return True

    def _printout(self):
        for i in self:
            return i + '\n'

    def sorted(self):
        if self._determine():
            return True
        return False


def SelectionSort(array):
    try:
        array = Compare(array)
        for ix in range(len(array)):
            m = ix
            j = ix + 1
            for j in range(len(array)):
                if array._compare(array[j], array[m]) == -1:
                    m = j
            array._swap(ix, m)
        return array
    except(TypeError) as error:
        print "Must insert array for sort to work."
share|improve this answer

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