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When a function takes a parameter as a reference to a const object, I understand that the object passed as argument to it cannot be modified using the reference? So is there any scenarios in C++ where a const object can be modified through a reference to it? If yes, show an example.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

C++ has a feature called mutable where a data member may be changed even through a const reference:

class Foo {
public:
    int a;
    mutable int b;
};

int main() {
    Foo f;
    f.a = 1; // ok
    f.b = 2; // ok
    const Foo &g = f;
    g.a = 1; // compile error
    g.b = 2; // ok
}

I get the following error:

In function 'int main()':
Line 12: error: assignment of data-member 'Foo::a' in read-only structure
compilation terminated due to -Wfatal-errors.

However, the assignment g.b = 2; succeeds.

This feature is usually used for private member variables only, where the changing of the data member does not affect the outside visible const-ness of the object. For example, it could be used as an optimisation to provide a way to cache previously calculated values.

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Thanks. Could you explain more on This feature is usually used for private member variables only –  LinuxPenseur Dec 29 '11 at 5:28
    
Just what it says really. If you have a public mutable member variable like in the example above, then the const doesn't really mean anything useful because the public part of the object can visibly change even through a const reference. On the other hand, if a private mutable member variable only does something internal like cache previously calculated results, then the public part of the object doesn't visibly change behaviour. –  Greg Hewgill Dec 29 '11 at 5:54

You can always cast away the const-ness using const_cast; this may lead to undefined behaviour if you're not careful.

I guess you could also contrive something like this:

class Foo
{
private:
    mutable int x;

public:
    void bar() const { x++; }
};

void func(const Foo &foo)
{
    foo.bar();
    // foo is now modified!
}
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The specific question is is there any scenarios in C++ where a const object can be modified through a reference to it?. Technically, if the object is const then casting away const-ness and using that to modify it will be Undefined Behavior always –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Dec 28 '11 at 23:37

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